2018 Presidential Election

The writing staff's collective reaction to a Democratic presidential candidate finally being declared the winner days after the election while having negative coattails in the House and not being able to give his party the Senate:

"What's a rerun?"
"You'll find out..."
 
The writing staff's collective reaction to a Democratic presidential candidate finally being declared the winner days after the election while having negative coattails in the House and not being able to give his party the Senate:

I seriously wonder which of the writers have a time machine. ;)
 
theedge.com, Sunday November 8th

The Republican Nomination Line


In every election cycle we can guarantee significant negative feedback from our immediate transition from midterms to Presidential race. “Give us a minute” the American populace will undoubtedly be thinking as rumours and reports around the intentions of Vice-President Jack Hunter dominate discussions this weekend. Our response? To kick off our 2022 Republican nomination line, a cycle that promises significant drama as we count down to the next General Election.

Why so soon? You say. Well the truth is that the rumours are not for nothing. Vice-President Hunter is a but one of a host of leading Republicans weighing their options this weekend. Like it or not, the GOP race is underway.

So where do we think things stand right now? Let’s take a look at the top contenders and how they stand.

Bubbling under: Senator Dylan Garrison (OH), 2018 nominee Henry Shallick, Governor Ben Laurion (MI), Senator Davis Roberts (TX), Senator Ellie Wilkins (NH).

10. Governor Peter Gault (KS) Gault’s improbable run in 2018 gives him the credibility to look into another national run but following his election to The Senate this week all evidence suggests that he will pass. With a loyal fan base and significant online presence even if he decides against his own run, Gault will have a key role in anointing as successor to his populist base.

9. Senator Michael Rojas (NM) He’s two years into his second term and I absolutely guarantee that should he pass on a run he’ll be at the top of every Vice-Presidential list when 2022 rolls around. There are factions in the GOP who are very keen that even with his relatively experience light resume that a Hispanic candidate would be a huge boost to their chances of unseating President Seaborn in 2022. For what it’s worth sources close to Rojas have suggested he’s not even thinking about it but with a number of high profile Republicans talking up his chances he’s definitely one to keep an eye on.

8. Senator Barbara Layton (NC). Layton’s chances could well be defined by what happens with the Governor of South Carolina, but if the Christian Conservative wing of the party need a champion to fill the void that Peter Gault exploited so well in 2018 then Layton would be well placed to take advantage. We know she has admirers at the top of the party and has met repeatedly with 2018 nominee Henry Shallick in recent months. She’s definitely considering her options.

7. Governor Morgan Mitchell (PA) Once seen as the future of the party, Mitchell’s star has dimmed in recent years. His closeness to Arnold Vinick who many Republicans are keen to forget is a major weakness to some. His connections to the Mitchell political dynasty also make him something of a divisive figure. On the flip side he’s been a very successful Governor of a swing state and would have the ability to raise a huge war chest. If he decides to get in he’s an intriguing boom or bust candidate.

6. Senator Carlin Cassidy (PA) There seems little doubt that Cassidy intends to make a run in 2022. The question ultimately will be how ready his party is for his maverick brand of libertarianism and deficit hawkishness. He has his supporters, they will get him onto the field, what happens then is anyone’s guess. He’s a skilled orator and campaigner but his message is not as mainstream as his fans would like and that will make his run an uphill climb.

5. Senator Ruth Norton-Stewart (OH) Three term congresswoman Norton-Stewart has built a significant power base in her party. She’s tipped for the role of Senate Majority Whip in the aftermath of the midterms and is thought to be seen as Cody Riley’s natural successor. That path to the top of the Republican Party may be about to be derailed as the Senator is believed to be strongly considering a White House run. She very nearly became Vice-President in 2010 and was only passed over for Liz Clark at the last moment. Her connections to the Walken team remain strong. In an interview last month former White House Chief of Staff Jane Braun said she was very keen on a Norton-Stewart run. She faces re-election in 2022 so the time for her to decide where she sees her future is drawing near.

4. Governor James Ritchie (FL) Ritchie has been a favourite for a Presidential run for years. Yet, every time he passes on the chance. Noises around the outgoing Governor of Florida suggest this year may be different but he’s known to be scarred by the bruising impact the 2002 race had on his father and family. If he wants it, he’s a serious contender, but that fire to run is a major question.

3. Governor Adam DeHaan (TX) DeHaan’s personal story of triumph over his father’s drug addiction and mother’s depression has been absolutely key to his political success in Texas. Now, his advisors are pushing for him to take his middle class Republicanism national. There are skeletons in DeHaan’s closet that need close scrutiny. Two failed marriages and his own brush with the law in his teens will need to be closely managed, but his executive experience and biography has wide scope for a Presidential run.

2. Governor Ethan Butler (SC) The Christian Conservative right have never had such an appealing candidate and South Carolina Governor Butler has every chance of going one better than his father, Reverend Don Butler did in 2006. Butler’s brand of economic populism and focus on the inclusion, diversity and charity nature of his faith has created a significant base in the Republican Party, it may also create cut through at a national level. He’s a skilled communicator with a style honed in evangelical preaching. If he’s in, he’s in to win.

1. Vice-President Jack Hunter (MN). Until the VP rules himself out he will top this line. If he decides to run then, barring any unforeseen disasters, he’ll be the nominee. His party is waiting anxiously to unite behind him and he polls fairly well in hypothetical contests against The President. There is a huge red flag though. He is currently seen as the loyal VP who put his country above his party and himself to ensure a smooth transition after a disastrous VP nomination by the man who now inhabits The White House, one major calculation Team Hunter need to make is whether he can transition to candidate Hunter and retain that popularity. Sources close to Hunter suggest he’ll make his intentions clear sooner than later. Until he does the race will be something of a phoney war.
 
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Sunday, November 8th, 2020

Collins blames "hot tempers" for "bizarre witch hunt" after midterms

Chair of the Democratic National Committee (DNC) Stephen Collins made the rounds on the Sunday talk show circuit in damage control after congressional Democrats began lambasting each other for the party's poor showing in the presidential midterms.

On Meet the Press, Collins agreed with host Chuck Todd on the "bizarre witch hunt" the party seemed to be going on after the midterms.

"Historically, the president's party loses seats in a midterm election," Collins said, "We frankly were expecting to lose the House of Representatives after our majority was whittled down in 2018, and knew that this would be a very tough Senate cycle for us...it could have conceivably been much worse."

The Democrats lost five seats while failing to pick up any, prompting criticism from some quarters. Collins had an answer for that.

"You know how many seats were were defending in states that voted for Henry Shallick two years ago? Eight. You want to know Shallick's average margin of victory in those states? Twenty-five percent. The one seat Republicans were defending in a state the president won? Oregon, that the president won with less than 500 votes because of a third-party candidate."

Appearing on Face the Nation, Collins said that Senator Andrew Howard (D-WA) was "misplaced" in blaming the party's showing on White House Chief of Staff Will Bailey and the inability of the White House to pass more substantial legislation.

"Senator Howard knows full well that the biggest roadblock in the past two years to passing the kinds of major legislation on issues like voting rights, further education reform, and now an economic stimulus to everyday Americans instead of a corporate handout, has been the Republican Senate under [Majority] Leader [Cody] Riley," Collins told host Margaret Brennan, "I think it's just his frustration with the results being misplaced, frankly."

Collins also said that blame was unfairly being lumped onto House Majority Super PAC chair Lauren Romano, amidst the loss of the House.

"I don't know what members of Congress are talking about when they say that she is responsible for dumping 'California cash' into races in Mississippi and West Virginia," Collins said. "We never targeted any seats in those states, so I frankly don't know what this person was talking about."

Similarly, Collins said, he was baffled by the congressman's idea that Democrats had been "talking about socialism".

"We have about two or three members/members-elect that identify as social democrats," Collins said, "The only people who were talking about 'socialism' outside of those very, very Democratic districts were Republican smear artists."

Despite reports that Howard would lead an effort to topple Senate Minority Leader Jimmy Fitzsimmons (D-MA), Howard's office put out a statement today saying that the senator would not challenge either Fitzsimmons or Minority Whip Sarah O'Brien (D-VT) for their positions, seeking only to "continue to faithfully represent the people of Washington to the best of my ability as senator and ranking member of the Senate Rules Committee." Reportedly, a major factor behind Senator Howard's decision not to seek a leadership position is that his cousin Eve is expected to become the second highest-ranking Democrat in the House after House Majority Leader Noah Gellman (D-VA)'s defeat.

Collins, whose wife Connie Tatum is currently White House Director of Legislative Affairs, has led the DNC since 2014. He is rumored to be on the shortlist for a Cabinet appointment either in the event of a second Seaborn term, or should certain cabinet positions (frequently Commerce, Health and Human Services or Transportation) become vacant.
 
capitolbeat.com, Monday November 9th

Ziegler: Party Facing An Existential Crisis


Controversial Democratic Analyst Toby Ziegler hit out at his party this morning accusing the party of leadership of being in "total denial" about the "existential crisis" the party faces. The former White House Communications Director spent Tuesday night covering the election for Capitol Beat and appeared on the show this morning to talk about the immediate fall out.

"It's time for us to take a serious look at where we are. The President has struggled to get the support he's needed from Congress and our party has failed to convince the American people that giving him that support will help. All I've heard since from (the party) leadership is excuses. I've heard some people say it doesn't matter because President's always lose out at the mid-terms, well I'm sorry but it matters a lot."

Ziegler has been surprisingly outspoken about the failures of his former colleague, President Seaborn but now appears to be reserving his ire for the DNC and the House and Senate election teams. "There was no message. We lost the house because the Republicans were organized, still highly energized after such a tight Presidential race and very clear about their message. They convinced big chunks of the American people that the President wants to turn America into a socialist utopia, we did nothing to counter that message."

In terms of immediate action Mr Ziegler called for significant changes. "The President needs to send a message. He needs to show that he's heard the American people and try to find common ground with the majorities in Congress. Right now I don't feel the kind of enthusiasm among the party that we're going to need to hold onto the White House."

The veteran operative also suggested some changes in personnel would help. "I think he needs something different in the West Wing, some new ideas. The overall party leadership could use a shakeup as well, some of those guys have been around far too long." The comments were seen as a shot at DNC Chairman Stephen Collins who is taking significant fire over the midterm performance.
 
townhall.com, Monday November 9th

Royce Forms Exploratory Committee; Considering Presidential Run


Former Senate Majority Leader Robert Royce confirmed this morning that he is establishing an exploratory committee to "investigate his options" around a Presidential run in 2022. Pennsylvania native Royce was considered one of the front runners for the nomination in 2010 but decided instead to focus on his role as his party's leader in the Senate.

Royce retired from the Senate in 2016 and has spent his time since working for the RNC and campaigning for Republican candidates across the country. In a video uploaded to social media Royce said that "the country faces a tough choice in 2022, whether to continue with the timid, ineffective leadership of President Seaborn or to look to restore the optimism that he inherited from President Walken."

Senator Royce's announced will surprise many, the majority of Republicans are expected to wait until Vice-President Jack Hunter has made his intentions clear before declaring their hands but Republican strategist James Eaton suggests that Royce couldn't really wait. "There are three or four big guns who can get into the race whenever they want - Butler, Ritchie, Norton-Stewart - but outside of them the rest of the field really need an early start. Senator Royce can get his name out there before the interests shifts to the top tier candidates and see if he can make a little bit of noise. If nothing else he'll raise his profile if there are cabinet jobs going."
 
townhall.com, Monday November 9th

Royce Forms Exploratory Committee; Considering Presidential Run


Former Senate Majority Leader Robert Royce confirmed this morning that he is establishing an exploratory committee to "investigate his options" around a Presidential run in 2022. Pennsylvania native Royce was considered one of the front runners for the nomination in 2010 but decided instead to focus on his role as his party's leader in the Senate.

Royce retired from the Senate in 2016 and has spent his time since working for the RNC and campaigning for Republican candidates across the country. In a video uploaded to social media Royce said that "the country faces a tough choice in 2022, whether to continue with the timid, ineffective leadership of President Seaborn or to look to restore the optimism that he inherited from President Walken."

Senator Royce's announced will surprise many, the majority of Republicans are expected to wait until Vice-President Jack Hunter has made his intentions clear before declaring their hands but Republican strategist James Eaton suggests that Royce couldn't really wait. "There are three or four big guns who can get into the race whenever they want - Butler, Ritchie, Norton-Stewart - but outside of them the rest of the field really need an early start. Senator Royce can get his name out there before the interests shifts to the top tier candidates and see if he can make a little bit of noise. If nothing else he'll raise his profile if there are cabinet jobs going."
Was it Royce who fumbled the question?
 
Royce is a surprise. If I recall right, he walked to the starting line in the 2010 primaries and then decided not to run in early 2009. I thought he was finished in politics after retiring in 2016.
 
NBS 2020.png

Monday November 9th 2020

Riddle concedes Florida gubernatorial race by e-mail

The concession phone call is a staple of the American political process, but Florida Congressman Tom Riddle couldn't bring himself to call his winning opponent Jessica Gelsey after their bitter election fight was finally called on Friday afternoon.

The Gelsey campaign had been expecting the concession after the networks called the result based on results from the Florida Elections Commission, indeed Gelsey delayed her victory celebrations to wait for a call from Congressman Riddle, but no call was placed. In the end she went ahead with what was a well received victory speech on Saturday. Sources from within the Gelsey camp said that the outgoing Republican Governor James Ritchie called her to offer his congratulations within minutes on the result being announced. It took the Riddle campaign until Sunday afternoon to concede the race although this was done via e-mail from the Riddle campaign e-mail address to the Gelsey e-mail account.

"It's disappointing that Congressman Riddle couldn't bring himself to concede the right way, but that is nothing more than we come to expect from him over the course of this campaign" a Gelsey campaign staffer told us.
 
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Incoming House of Representatives

The big story from the 2020 midterm elections is the Republicans taking the House for the first time in 14 years. Currently, things stand at 222 seats for the Democrats, 212 for the Republicans and one vacancy (Utah's 1st district).

But what exactly will the House look like when it convenes on January 3rd, 2021 to serve as a challenge to President Sam Seaborn?


Republican Party: 230 seats
Democratic Party: 205 seats

Barring any party-switches, surprise vacancies or appointments, this is the layout of House of Representatives when it will begin its 117th iteration. Republicans hold a strong advantage, but can't rest on their laurels; it's a redistricting year and most of these representatives will have their district lines redrawn in some way, while a few will find out soon that they will have to seek a new district to run in in two years' time if they hope to stay in "the people's house".

2021 Freshmen
Democrats

  1. Pablo Aldrete (D-CA-46), incumbent Brendan Harper (D) is retiring
  2. Paula Armitage (D-FL-24) defeated incumbent Raul Montero (R)
  3. Nick Barlos (D-NH-01), incumbent Franz Duke (R) is retiring
  4. Beverly Carr (D-NC-06), incumbent Phil Eeling (R) is retiring
  5. Jo Dole (D-MO-01), incumbent Clay Richmond (D) is retiring
  6. Brianna Fritz (D-MD-05), incumbent Albert Fife (D) is retiring
  7. Demetrius Gray (D-MD-07), incumbent Elijah Mays (D) is retiring
  8. Monique Halliday (D-MA-07), incumbent Alan Trent (D) is retiring
  9. Montell Jamison (D-NY-17), incumbent Steve McKenna (D) is retiring
  10. Gabriel Morillo (D-CA-29), incumbent Guillermo Augusto (D) is retiring
  11. Wendy Nealling (D-KY-03), defeated incumbent Nicholas Townsend (R)
  12. Robyn O'Neal (D-IL-02), incumbent Barry Robinson (D) is retiring
  13. Danny Owens (D-IL-01), incumbent Todd Evers (D) is retiring
  14. Rita Pence (D-IA-02), incumbent Dennis Sanders (D) is retiring
  15. Sara Pérez (D-CA-53), incumbent Ellen Bloomberg (D) is retiring
  16. Gina Ramírez (D-TX-23), incumbent Luis Lamberto (R) is retiring
  17. Kevin Redman (D-NJ-09), defeated incumbent Mike Sheare (R)
  18. Patrick Sampson (D-NY-05), incumbent James Gatsby (D) is retiring
  19. J.R. Schultz (D-CO-05), defeated incumbent Daniel Wellsley (R)
  20. Tom Strnad (D-IN-01), incumbent Tom Peterson (D) is retiring
  21. Rich Torres (D-NY-15), incumbent Gabriel Martinez (D) is retiring
  22. Alex Truesdale (D-OR-01), filling vacancy left by Arthur Carney (D)'s death
Republican
  1. Lisa Ackermann (R-PA-07), incumbent Matt Addams (R) is retiring
  2. Mason Arnold (R-AR-04), incumbent Tucker Johnson (R) is retiring
  3. Sidney Ball (R-CO-03), defeated incumbent Chase Sweet (R)
  4. Rulon Carrington (R-UT-01), filling vacancy left by Ford Brimgardner (R)'s death
  5. Nicole Catsimidis (R-NY-11), defeated incumbent Eli Rosen (D)
  6. John Cleveland (R-WV-01), incumbent Mac Walters (R) is retiring
  7. Brian DeMaio (R-CA-50), incumbent Joe Reese (R) is retiring
  8. Collin Fitzjames (R-PA-01), defeated incumbent Rick Nelson (R)
  9. Amanda Galloway (R-KS-03), incumbent Jardine Mantell (R) is retiring
  10. Karl Greer (R-AR-01), incumbent Wallace Conklin (D) is retiring
  11. Frank Harrison (R-VA-02), defeated incumbent Marcus Donovan (D)
  12. Jim Hegseth (R-MN-01), incumbent Bill Vanderleen (D) is retiring
  13. Rick Hunter (R-FL-03), defeated incumbent April Fearon (D)
  14. Denny Irving (R-NC-13), defeated incumbent Julius Schreibman (D)
  15. Shawn Jacobs (R-PA-17) defeated incumbent Erin Gatwood (D)
  16. Cynthia King (R-CA-45), defeated incumbent Alex Perrin (D)
  17. Patty King (R-GA-14), incumbent Norm Burke (R) is retiring
  18. Carolyn Klosterman (R-WA-03), defeated incumbent Mark Ohanko (D)
  19. Matt Lynch (R-WI-08), defeated incumbent Nicole Henderson (R)
  20. Jerry Marsh (R-GA-07), incumbent David Horton (R) is retiring
  21. Vince Mercer (R-OH-01), defeated incumbent Charles Ferris (D)
  22. Jason McCloud (R-WV-02), incumbent Pat Smigel (D) is retiring
  23. Jim McHenry (R-NY-02), defeated incumbent Carson Dellinger (D)
  24. Terry Molloney (R-OK-05), incumbent Daryl Lukins (R) is retiring
  25. Brandon Morgan (R-AZ-02), defeated incumbent Tom Reilly (D)
  26. Peter Mouw (R-MI-04), incumbent Gus Edwards (R) is retiring
  27. Roy Ryan (R-TX-06), incumbent Patrick Quinton (R) is retiring
  28. Joe Schweitzer (R-IL-14), defeated incumbent Mitch Davis (D)
  29. Glenn Shaw (R-OH-10), defeated incumbent Ralph DiMarco (D)
  30. Lewis Simpson (R-TX-32), incumbent Margot Knight (D) is retiring
  31. Skip Sullivan (R-CA-10), defeated incumbent Andy Pittman (D)
  32. Jennifer Vinick (R-CA-26), defeated incumbent Corrie Hightower (D)
  33. John Wark (R-VA-09), defeated incumbent Noah Gellman (D)
  34. Phil Wheaton (R-SC-07), defeated incumbent Cory Bamber (D)
  35. Ted Wyman (R-FL-13), incumbent Tom Riddle (R) is retiring

2021 Incumbents
Democrats

  1. Fatima Ali (D-MN-05)
  2. Mark Andrews (D-VA-11)
  3. Hector Arroyo (D-AZ-07)
  4. Richard Arthur (D-MI-05)
  5. Emma Avila (D-AZ-09)
  6. Josie Bail (D-OH-09)
  7. Erin Baker (D-CA-38)
  8. Kendrick Baker (D-FL-09)
  9. Elle Barclay (D-SC-04)
  10. John Baxley (D-IL-07)
  11. Allison Baynes (D-VA-08)
  12. Benjamin Benoit (D-NH-02)
  13. Evelyn Bindo (D-HI-01)
  14. Ty Blount (D-IA-01)
  15. Aaron Bonds (D-NC-12)
  16. Sue Borden (D-NC-01)
  17. Ty Branson (D-NJ-03)
  18. Max Brantley (D-CT-04)
  19. Earl Brennan (D-CT-05)
  20. Keira Briggs (D-NY-06)
  21. Nikolaus Bronislaus (D-MI-12)
  22. Robert Bruce (D-FL-27)
  23. Olivia Buckland (D-IN-05)
  24. Rebecca Burgoon (D-CA-51)
  25. Patsy Burns (D-TX-09)
  26. Esteban Cabello (D-NM-03)
  27. Kellen Cahill (D-CA-32)
  28. Sam Callas (D-LA-02)
  29. Tomas Candellario (D-NM-01)
  30. John Capuano (D-CA-05)
  31. Lando Carmen (D-CA-35)
  32. Janelle Carson (D-MD-04)
  33. Melissa Castle (D-NY-25)
  34. Arianna Cathey (D-MA-05)
  35. Jack Caton (D-CA-12)
  36. Randy Celeste (D-CA-30)
  37. Jose Cervantes (D-FL-26)
  38. Diego Chavez (D-TX-35)
  39. Anthony Cipriani (D-PA-08)
  40. Holly Clarke (D-NJ-06)
  41. Alvin Coates (D-CA-47)
  42. Maria Consuelo (D-TX-15)
  43. Arthur Cornforth (D-PA-03)
  44. Eddie Cullin (D-TX-30)
  45. Theo Damaskos (D-MA-08)
  46. Luis De Herrera (D-CA-34)
  47. Kenneth Dent (D-VA-04)
  48. Mark Dewitt (D-TX-33)
  49. Selina Draper (D-FL-21)
  50. Julia Dreyer (D-NY-10)
  51. Benjamin Emanuel (D-MD-08)
  52. Brandon Fields (D-MI-14)
  53. Sheila Fields (D-WI-04)
  54. Tim Fields (D-TX-29)
  55. Ana Flores (D-TX-18)
  56. Diane Frost (D-ME-01)
  57. Katherine Garcia (D-CA-17)
  58. Carol Gelsey (D-FL-19)
  59. Tavon Glass (D-CA-43)
  60. Eli Gold (D-MA-04)
  61. Trent Gorman (D-CA-21)
  62. Ernesto Granado (D-CA-19)
  63. Pauline Granholm (D-MN-03)
  64. Lewis Grant (D-FL-20)
  65. Claudia Greenwood (D-CA-06)
  66. Anderson Gruber (D-GA-13)
  67. Thom Grunder (D-MN-07)
  68. Ivan Gutierrez (D-AZ-03)
  69. Marcia Gutierrez (D-CA-44)
  70. Cameron Hall (D-WA-09)
  71. Marvin Hallifax (D-CA-02)
  72. Laura Halperin (D-CT-01)
  73. Khalil Hamdan (D-NJ-08)
  74. Greg Hamilton (D-NY-08)
  75. Pat Haney (D-FL-22)
  76. Jessie Hayward (D-GA-02)
  77. Drake Headley (D-WI-03)
  78. Sam Heller (D-NY-20)
  79. Ted Helton (D-TN-05)
  80. Lydia Hemmer (D-PA-02)
  81. Nick Henderson (D-CO-07)
  82. Naomi Herrera-Rodriguez (D-NY-13)
  83. Sophia Hill (D-CO-06)
  84. Eve Howard (D-CA-28)
  85. Sam Howard (D-CA-20)
  86. Walt Hubbard (D-NJ-01)
  87. Juan Iglesias (D-TX-20)
  88. James Incavaglia (D-IL-08)
  89. Mark Jenks (D-NY-26)
  90. J.R. Jennsen (D-IL-03)
  91. Jeff Johnson (D-FL-18)
  92. Cody Joseph (D-CA-09)
  93. Brian Kapahala (D-HI-02)
  94. Samantha Kennedy (D-PA-18)
  95. Olivia King (D-CO-01)
  96. Jacob Klein (D-PA-05)
  97. Gene Kramer (D-IL-17)
  98. Brody Lambert (D-CA-33)
  99. Alexis Laroquette (D-VT-AL)
  100. Gregory Laurie (D-NJ-12)
  101. Kristin LeBrandt (D-CA-11)
  102. Marcus LeBrandt (D-OH-11)
  103. Russell Lewis (D-CA-37)
  104. George Washington Li (D-WA-01)
  105. Tim Longo (D-RI-01)
  106. Maria Lopez Estudillo (D-CA-36)
  107. Kevin Lyson (D-WA-07)
  108. Daniel Maddox (D-IL-09)
  109. Donte Madison (D-GA-05)
  110. Isaac Marshall (D-TN-09)
  111. Caroline Martin (D-MA-03)
  112. Mary Maskaleris (D-IL-05)
  113. Tanya Mathis (D-DE-AL)
  114. Roger Matthews (D-OH-13)
  115. Derek Maxwell (D-NV-01)
  116. Rosalie Mazur (D-CT-02)
  117. Billy McCain (D-AL-07)
  118. Megan McKeena (D-CA-40)
  119. Luke Minnear (D-FL-13)
  120. David Moore (D-MO-05)
  121. Wire Munson (D-NY-14)
  122. James Newhouse (D-IL-12)
  123. Micah O'Rourke (D-NV-04)
  124. Eli Palmer (D-GA-04)
  125. Joyce Pearce (D-IL-11)
  126. D.R. Perry (D-NJ-05)
  127. Nate Petrelli (D-NY-12)
  128. Chris Petrie (D-CO-02)
  129. Jack Phelps (D-MD-06)
  130. Sharon Pine (D-NY-09)
  131. Judy Portillo (D-CA-31)
  132. Carol Powell (D-NY-18)
  133. Gina Pratt (D-VA-03)
  134. Alan Price (D-MT-AL)
  135. Raymond Purcell (D-MS-02)
  136. Andrea Quinn (D-NC-04)
  137. David Ramirez (D-NY-07)
  138. Stephen Reed (D-MA-02)
  139. Joan Reese (D-OH-02)
  140. Tom Remus (D-OH-03)
  141. Evan Rhodes (D-OR-03)
  142. Michael Rice (D-MI-13)
  143. Jack Rivers (D-NY-24)
  144. Pedro Rodriguez (D-IL-04)
  145. Ned Rothstein (D-CT-03)
  146. Jordan Samuels (D-MN-08)
  147. Chris Sandler (D-IL-10)
  148. Stephen Savage (D-CA-13)
  149. Len Segal (D-FL-05)
  150. John Sellers (D-NC-02)
  151. Melanie Selles (D-MN-04)
  152. Mark Sellner (D-MA-01)
  153. Colleen Schrute (D-FL-10)
  154. Kara Sherman (D-CA-15)
  155. George Simmell (D-CA-14)
  156. Randy Sims (D-WA-02)
  157. Ray Sindh (D-MA-06)
  158. Grant Spencer (D-SC-06)
  159. Olivia Stabler (D-NY-16)
  160. Jack Stanton (D-AR-02)
  161. Steven Stevens (D-FL-14)
  162. Francis Suarez (D-TX-28)
  163. Jose Sutter (D-TX-16)
  164. Peter Swanson (D-MA-09)
  165. Chris Thiele (D-RI-02)
  166. Patty Thompson-Kline (D-WA-06)
  167. Andrew Travis (D-MI-09)
  168. Mike Tuccinelli (D-NY-04)
  169. Ronnie Tucker (D-NY-03)
  170. Ken Uyeda (D-CA-18)
  171. Tom Vanier (D-WA-10)
  172. Felipe Vega (D-TX-34)
  173. Juan Vincente (D-CA-27)
  174. Bud Wachtell (D-WI-02)
  175. Ben Wade (D-CA-24)
  176. Tim Walker (D-FL-23)
  177. Julianne Wake (D-CA-03)
  178. Leslie Wang (D-CA-41)
  179. Sam Weston (D-MD-02)
  180. Dan Whiteside (D-MD-03)
  181. Cedric Williams (D-NJ-10)
  182. Franklin Woodside (D-AK-AL)
  183. Peter Zelowsky (D-ME-02)
Republicans
  1. Daniel Abend (R-KY-04)
  2. Matt Acklan (R-NV-03)
  3. Brett Allen (R-TN-02)
  4. Jim Arkin (R-ID-01)
  5. Percy Barnett (R-TN-03)
  6. Karl Beck (R-UT-03)
  7. Joseph Bellefontaine (R-OH-04)
  8. Cory Bender (R-TX-10)
  9. Dustin Benedict (R-GA-01)
  10. Veronica Benjamin (R-ND-AL)
  11. Anthony Bentley (R-NE-01)
  12. Julianne Betancourt (R-UT-04)
  13. Allan Blant (R-MO-08)
  14. Henry Bortles (R-NC-07)
  15. Samuel Bottrell (R-WI-01)
  16. Mark Bowman (R-MI-01)
  17. Linda Brass (R-CA-07)
  18. Grady Bridges (R-AL-04)
  19. Ted Broderick (R-FL-16)
  20. Chip Brown (R-WA-04)
  21. Joseph Bruno (R-PA-14)
  22. Mike Burton (R-TX-27)
  23. Joe Calhoun (R-NY-01)
  24. Kurt Cameron (R-VA-10)
  25. Stanley Carmichael (R-IN-05)
  26. Dave Carlton (R-TX-08)
  27. Andrew Casey (R-NY-27)
  28. Riley Church (R-CA-39)
  29. Bernard Clark (R-KY-06)
  30. Stu Clendon (R-NJ-04)
  31. Austin Cohen (R-IL-06)
  32. Quentin Collier (R-AZ-01)
  33. John Collington (R-TX-17)
  34. Winchester Collins (R-CA-23)
  35. Freddie Coons (R-MI-06)
  36. Booby Cornbaugh (R-WI-05)
  37. Tawny Cryer (R-KS-02)
  38. James Culkin (R-AZ-04)
  39. Rick Cummings (R-GA-12)
  40. Jim Cutter (R-NY-22)
  41. Lydia Daniels (R-PA-04)
  42. Auggie Davis (R-GA-03)
  43. Bill Delmon (R-IL-13)
  44. Clint Desjarlais (R-VA-06)
  45. Jim Doldier (R-AL-01)
  46. MacKenzie Dreifort (R-AL-05)
  47. Callie Durling (R-IL-16)
  48. Will Durham (R-CA-16)
  49. Ralph Ellis (R-TX-07)
  50. David Epps (R-NC-09)
  51. Leif Eriksen (R-MN-02)
  52. Tom Erstad (R-WI-07)
  53. Cass Erving (R-GA-09)
  54. Thomas Evers (R-LA-03)
  55. Al Farley (R-TX-36)
  56. Christopher Finn (R-TX-31)
  57. Tucker Fitzpatrick (R-NJ-02)
  58. Troy Foster (R-AZ-08)
  59. Greg Fournier (R-MS-04)
  60. Jack Fowler (R-NJ-11)
  61. Chris Franklin (R-PA-10)
  62. Pauline Gardner (R-KY-01)
  63. Matthew Garner (R-CO-04)
  64. J.D. Garrett (R-NE-02)
  65. Ronald Gennings (R-TX-11)
  66. Darren Gibson (R-MI-08)
  67. Phillip Goddard (R-KS-01)
  68. Carol Goodman (R-MO-03)
  69. Doug Grassley (R-CA-01)
  70. Lucas Gregory (R-MI-10)
  71. Charles Hacker (R-WV-03)
  72. Miles Harper (R-TN-06)
  73. Steve Harriman (R-LA-04)
  74. Jim Hagen (R-GA-10)
  75. Brian Hale (R-IA-04)
  76. John Hancock (R-TX-04)
  77. Mitchell Harris (R-IN-06)
  78. Lynn Haven (R-FL-02)
  79. Glen Heinsohn (R-WI-06)
  80. Brett Henson (R-VA-07)
  81. Peter Herger (R-CA-52)
  82. Todd Hitch (R-MO-04)
  83. Jim Hoff (R-OH-06)
  84. Mark Hospers (R-IN-03)
  85. Chris Hughes (R-UT-02)
  86. Jim Hull (R-CA-48)
  87. Craig Huron (R-GA-08)
  88. Greg Hutchins (R-OR-02)
  89. Kevin Huxley (R-PA-12)
  90. Kyle Jackson (R-PA-15)
  91. Nick Jarrett (R-NC-03)
  92. Tim Johnson (R-FL-17)
  93. Bill Jones (R-AZ-05)
  94. Curt Judd (R-KS-04)
  95. Michael Judge (R-FL-25)
  96. Francis Kilner (R-FL-04)
  97. Peter Lien (R-TX-22)
  98. Amanda Leggitt (R-WA-08)
  99. Lawrence Locke (R-FL-01)
  100. Chris Maddox (R-VA-05)
  101. Solomon C. Malden (R-OK-04)
  102. John Marks (R-VA-01)
  103. Bryan Mason (R-AL-02)
  104. Bob Mayer (R-TX-14)
  105. Scott McGregor (R-FL-06)
  106. Rob McLauchlin (R-CA-42)
  107. Todd Means (R-IN-04)
  108. Johnston Meek (R-CA-08)
  109. Steven Milling (R-LA-01)
  110. Charles Miner (R-TX-01)
  111. Robert G. Mitchell (R-OH-08)
  112. Tommy Ray Mitchell (R-NC-05)
  113. Alton Moore (R-CA-49)
  114. Kay Mort (R-FL-08)
  115. Kevin Nix (R-IA-03)
  116. Jim Norton (R-MI-02)
  117. Roy Norton (R-TN-07)
  118. Gary Oliver (R-TX-13)
  119. Rep Omundson (R-TX-05)
  120. Kurt Oswald (R-NM-02)
  121. Bob Paccioretti (R-OH-07)
  122. Corey Parker (R-AL-06)
  123. Frank Parry (R-TX-02)
  124. Jordan Peele (R-MO-06)
  125. Rhondda Persell (R-PA-16)
  126. John Peters (R-TX-12)
  127. Walter Peterson (R-TN-04)
  128. Randy Pitt (R-TX-19)
  129. John Pitter (R-PA-06)
  130. John M. Porter (R-NC-10)
  131. Ron Prentice (R-MI-03)
  132. Jerry Proctor (R-MI-07)
  133. Simeon Puller (R-AL-03)
  134. Jackie Raines (R-IN-02)
  135. Connor Ramsay (R-NJ-07)
  136. Don Ramsay (R-OH-05)
  137. Brett Randolph (R-MN-06)
  138. Uriah Rathburn (R-TX-26)
  139. Donnie Reeves (R-MS-01)
  140. Shane Reeves (R-OK-03)
  141. Martin Reynolds (R-KY-02)
  142. Donald Richter (R-MD-01)
  143. Ray Riggleman (R-IL-18)
  144. Del Roberts (R-NY-19)
  145. Calvin Robin (R-KY-05)
  146. Michelle Rodriguez (R-TX-03)
  147. Benedicto Romero (R-TX-21)
  148. Dominic Rudig (R-GA-11)
  149. Elton Russell (R-GA-06)
  150. Eddie Santoni (R-PA-11)
  151. Ronald Schultz (R-TN-08)
  152. Bill Schwerner (R-AZ-06)
  153. Kyle Sebastian (R-CA-22)
  154. Wilson Sharpe (R-SC-05)
  155. Abel Sheen (R-WY-AL)
  156. Ben Sizemore (R-PA-09)
  157. Randal Simons VI (R-FL-15)
  158. Billie Smith (R-SC-01)
  159. Gerald Somerfield (R-MI-11)
  160. Alan Spicer (R-TN-01)
  161. Curtis Spurling (R-MS-03)
  162. Patricia Stecker (R-LA-06)
  163. Joseph Steele (R-OH-16)
  164. Tony Sutton (R-SD-AL)
  165. Merchant Tanner (R-TX-24)
  166. Drew Taylor (R-CA-04)
  167. Phil Taylor (R-PA-13)
  168. Patricia Templeton (R-MO-07)
  169. Eugene Tewes (R-LA-05)
  170. Bonnie Thayer (R-AR-03)
  171. Zach Thibodeaux (R-MO-02)
  172. Steven Thomas (R-WA-05)
  173. Trent Thornburg (R-FL-11)
  174. Cynthi Tibbs (R-OH-12)
  175. Gail Trent (R-NE-03)
  176. Marvin Troughton (R-IL-15)
  177. Gary Tutt (R-IN-08)
  178. Kristin Vazquez (R-CA-25)
  179. Heathcliff Verlander (R-ID-02)
  180. Katie Voight (R-NY-21)
  181. Hank Wallace (R-NV-02)
  182. Dustin Walton (R-OH-14)
  183. Markford Wayne (R-OK-02)
  184. Audra Weaver (R-FL-07)
  185. Lee Weldon (R-TX-25)
  186. Todd White (R-OH-15)
  187. Frank Whitley (R-NY-23)
  188. Samantha Wilcox (R-NC-08)
  189. Scott Wilson (R-SC-03)
  190. Todd Winters (R-SC-04)
  191. Jim Woodcock (R-NC-11)
  192. Rod Wooden (R-OK-01)
  193. Caroline Young (R-OR-05)
  194. Kris Young (R-IN-09)
  195. Cody Zucker (R-OR-04)
 
capitolbeat.com, Tuesday November 10th

Duke Woos Social Conservatives As He Eyes White House Run


Alan Duke, the former Senator from Oklahoma, is reportedly gearing up for a run for President and is courting major social conservatives to build momentum for his candidacy. Duke, a controversial figure during his time in the Senate, has met with a number of influential figures on the right of the party and spent last weekend with former Alabama Governor Wes Burke.

It's believed that Burke was joined by talk radio host George Rohr who is a leading figure amongst Christian conservatives, having served as the Chairman of the American Christian Assembly for over a decade before standing down amid controversy over homophobic comments he made in 2015 whilst involved with a Mississippi Gubernatorial race. Rohr more recently announced that he had taken over the running of America for Better Families, who he has been lobbying for in recent years, and intended to be "a big voice" for "people who believe in the American family."

There is hope amongst Team Duke that they can tap a similar enthusiasm that Kansas Governor Peter Gault grabbed in 2018 and he hopes to get off to a fast start in order to boost that campaign. The support of Burke and Rohr was be a big early boost but the major risk to his campaign, and to anyone hoping to attract social conservatives will be the decision of South Carolina Governor Ethan Butler. If Butler runs there is an expectation that he will sweep up all of the important evangelical vote and choke off the potential for candidates like Duke and North Carolina's Barbara Layton.
 
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Oh right, I should probably upload the infoboxes now that we've finished the midterm elections:


The note in the "All 435 seats in the House of Representatives" field would explain that all six non-voting members were also up for re-election this year. It's unmentioned, but all six incumbents were reelected.

Interestingly enough, Puerto Rico's resident commissioner is elected for four-year terms, the only member of the House to do so.
The inset box in Kentucky is the Class 3 seat formerly held by James Lancaster (R). Appointee Terrance H. Schraeder (R) was elected to fill the remaining two years on Lancaster's term, so that one is an "Republican hold", while the Class 2 seat held by retiring Democrat Calvin Bowles was won by GOP candidate James Lincoln (hence the "Republican gain" coloring).
De Haan and Liz Bartlet are the chairs of the Republican and Democratic Governors Associations for 2020, respectively.
And a larger version of the House map in the infobox for those interested:

 
I will post full PDF's of the results from the Senate and Gub races in the next week or so, but for those who do like these type of things below is a table with the ten best performing third party candidates in the Senate races.
Senate-Best Performing Third Party-candidates
CandidatePartyState% of the Vote
Rudi VansenIndependentNew Mexico15.39
Jim HaskinsAlaskan IndependenceAlaska10.47
Ron GibbonsSouthern RightsAlabama5.55
Angela EllisLibertarianIllinois5.09
Tina JackProgressiveWest Virginia4.56
Carl FlynnGreenMinnesota4.13
Debbie KellySocialist (endorsed by the Greens)Oregon4.11
Jamie TaylorLibertarianNebraska3.86
Marty AllenLibertarianNew Hampshire3.64
Andy NitterGreenMassachusetts3.55
 
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Gubernatorial-Best Performing Third Party Candidates
CandidatePartyState% of the Vote
John TomarichoIndependent PopulistWyoming16.44
Anderson GeraldGreenRhode Island10.17
Grayson HeathAlaskan IndependenceAlaska9.09
Ryan CooperGreenDelaware4.76
Terri HazelGreenMaine4.49
Timothy PetersonGreenMinnesota3.81
James DreadenLibertarianUtah3.78
Patrick HenryProgressiveIllionois3.74
Asa RansonSouthern RightsArkansas3.15
Jonathan LeemanSouthern RightsTexas3.05
 
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