2018 Presidential Election

I would also like to point out that back when this series of threads got started the forum was on vBulletin. Also image hosting places like imgur weren't even up yet. vBulletin itself was particularly infuriating as it had a limited 30 day edit limit, and no threadmarking capability. In fact the only reason we have some of the earliest infoboxes is because I had saved the hard copy, and it was in a folder that missed a data purge so I could play GTA V. imagebucket, or photobucket, which we used to host all of our images in the early days shut down free accounts after a certain time period. Many things were lost. Like Tim Thomason's flags off all nations, full wikiboxes of sessions of congresses, supreme court justices back to Staub and many others.

In short research is required because quite literally we have to contend with 600 pages full of text and infoposts, scattered memories of photobucket blocked images, over the the better part of 10 years. It's hard enough keeping track of the ACTUAL congress, let alone a fictional one.
My images of flags still seem to be in existence. They were uploaded in individual posts to the forum. I have lost alot of images, though (thanks, ImageShack), and most were made three or four computers ago and I made very few attempts at saving them.

I lost my mind once trying to compile a full list of all Senators of all time, because it is a Gordian knot of epic proportions (it was in 2013) requiring a very large amount of retconning and ignoring old posts (New York insanity) and the TV show (which had three long-term Illinois Senators) and trying to keep the statistics on point with party leadership changes and then the thread suddenly dropped in another Virginia Senator when I had everything almost locked down and...

Sometimes its best to take a step back and not put everything under a microscope. Like the show did. I usually view the casting as a side bit of fun we were engaged in, and not really canonical to the storyline at large. I may have started the whole trend with my abortive cast lists in the first few pages in early 2009, although they didn't pick up steam until January 2010, mostly between Jay Cruger and Mark (and then much more when I began doing wiki images).
 
My images of flags still seem to be in existence. They were uploaded in individual posts to the forum. I have lost alot of images, though (thanks, ImageShack), and most were made three or four computers ago and I made very few attempts at saving them.

I lost my mind once trying to compile a full list of all Senators of all time, because it is a Gordian knot of epic proportions (it was in 2013) requiring a very large amount of retconning and ignoring old posts (New York insanity) and the TV show (which had three long-term Illinois Senators) and trying to keep the statistics on point with party leadership changes and then the thread suddenly dropped in another Virginia Senator when I had everything almost locked down and...

Sometimes its best to take a step back and not put everything under a microscope. Like the show did. I usually view the casting as a side bit of fun we were engaged in, and not really canonical to the storyline at large. I may have started the whole trend with my abortive cast lists in the first few pages in early 2009, although they didn't pick up steam until January 2010, mostly between Jay Cruger and Mark (and then much more when I began doing wiki images).
Out of curiosity do you have anything left of that Senate project, I was recently thinking about trying to get together a definitive list and set it up on Google doc? Any help would be appreciated even if it from a snapshot in 2013. We can all stand taller on the shoulders of giants after all, and you were definitely a giant in those matters back then. But I think we should move to a private conversation to discuss in further detail
 


Wednesday, September 16th, 2020

High marks for Franklin after Senate questioning

Ahead of her final day of testimony before the Senate Judiciary Committee, Supreme Court nominee Olivia Emmett Franklin has earned high marks across most of the political spectrum for her responses to tough questions from the various committee members. Franklin, chief judge of the United States District Court for South Carolina, handled tough questions from the committee on several hot button political issues—abortion, affirmative action, gun control and presidential powers—in a way that displayed her impressive command of legal precedent and jurisprudence. Senator Barbara Layton (R-NC), one of the staunchest conservatives on the committee who took the lead in questioning Franklin on her views on abortion, grudgingly admitted that Franklin was "doing okay" when asked for a statement.

"She has a very deep and thorough understanding of the law," Franklin told NBS, "She is very measured and shows a good view of legal reasoning."

"I think she has done tremendously well," Senator Dante Jenkins (D-NJ) said, "She's shown a tremendous ability to remember key facts, findings and keep her resolve under pressure...She shows the same characteristics I would expect for someone sitting on the nation's highest court."

On abortion, Franklin stated that Roe v. Wade "has been the settled law of the land for nearly 50 years" and stated that she would not speculate "on whether [conditions] have changed enough for the Court to revisit its ruling." She was more open about affirmative action, saying that she "found more support" in the arguments in support of "careful, narrowly-tailored" affirmative action programs to support members of racial and ethnic minorities opposed to those against, but said that she did not consider the use of these programs to "always be appropriate or necessary."

Senator Mark Cumberland (R-TX) asked Franklin about the Second Amendment, saying that his constituents "couldn't forgive me" if he let "someone who makes it easier for the government to get their guns" on the Supreme Court.

Franklin said she had not seen existing cases that would "make it easier for the government to 'get' people's guns" and said that she would not comment on any such cases without "having all the facts before [her]." She did say, however, that she supported the right to bear arms "within the confines previously laid down by the Court."

Republicans have a narrow majority in the Senate, but Franklin's performance and status as the first African-American nominee to the Supreme Court in over two decades has made it difficult for several senators, particularly those in blue or swing states, to contemplate voting against the president's nominee. Curtis Ryan (R-OR), the most embattled Republican senator up for re-election this year, has said he would "be open" to voting in favor of Franklin if she passed through the committee.

If confirmed, Franklin would be the 116th justice to sit on the Supreme Court, as well as become the first female African-American justice.
 

Guess 2020 thought things weren't chaotic enough.

Here some infoboxes instead:


Cast
Peter Outerbridge as Leslie Van Merhalls
Adrian Dunbar as Seamus Flynn
Ruth Madoc as Bronwyn Williams (new casting)
Igal Naor as Rashim Khalid al-Faruq

  • A lot of Van Merhalls' career is based off of the late Jim Flaherty's, since he was established as (like Flaherty) being the longtime finance minister to the then-current Conservative PM when he was introduced.

    Besides Gardner and Liz No. 2, most of the other people in his infobox are new. The only one that really matters is the Governor-General, Luc Doucette, who my headcanon has started the same time (October 2017) as the OTL incumbent, Julie Payette.

  • Like Trudeau IOTL, Van Merhalls is residing in another official residence while the Canadian PM's traditional residence (24 Sussex Drive) undergoes renovation.

  • Flynn's career is a mix of OTL Northern Ireland First Minister Arlene Foster and her deputy Nigel Dodds'. McIntyre was established as the previous DUP leader, but I'm establishing him as having been Northern Ireland's First Minister from 2007 to 2015, when he was replaced by Flynn.

  • A note on Northern Ireland: because of the history of sectarian violence, Northern Ireland's executive needs to be made up of both unionist (parties that NI want to stay within the UK, typically Protestant and right-wing) and republican (parties that want NI to join the Republic of Ireland, typically Catholic and left-wing). Changes since the Good Friday Agreement (which ended the Troubles both IOTL & ITTL) also made it so that the top two executive positions—the First Minister and deputy First Minister (no, that's not a typo; it really is "deputy First Minister", not "Deputy First Minister")—must be held by leaders of the largest unionist and largest republican parties.

    There also exists a mechanism in case no government can be formed, or if it falls apart and can't reconstitute itself: the devolution of powers to the NI Assembly is suspended and Northern Ireland is ruled directly from London. IOTL, it's happened for an extended period twice (2002 to 2017 and recently from 2017 to January of this year), while *here* it only happened once (the 2002-2007 period).

  • That is why Flynn is being listed as "serving with Katherine O'Neill" [the leader of Sinn Féin] as First Minister, and why the DPM (capitalized because Wikipedia) is listed in each of his earlier ministerial positions.

  • Williams was established, but almost everyone else (sans the Labour leaders and of course Elizabeth II) is new. Since Wales was established as having elected a Labour-Liberal Democrat government in the previous election (2016), I figured it would have extended backwards to the election before that (2011), and that before then, Welsh Labour had a majority by itself.

    The box gives away who her predecessors as Welsh First Minister were (Bushell and Morgan). It's not explicitly stated, but Bushell was also a Labourite, meaning (like OTL), Wales has never had a non-Labour First Minister as of 2020.

  • Since Williams has led the Welsh Labour Party for over a decade, she's also on her fifth Labour leader, which has got to be some kind of record.

    Speaking of a decade, Williams is ten years younger than her actress, thanks to good living and Hollywood (or Cardiff?) magic.

  • Khalid's biography, as mentioned before, is based off of Hussein Kamel al-Majid.

    If you're counting, yes that's five different titles that Saddam (IOTL & ITTL) consolidated for himself and that Khalid took upon seizing power. Aren't autocracies run by paranoid, bloodthirsty tyrants fun?
 
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