2010 US Presidential Election

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April 6, 2010

Alexander in double digits for the first time since start of campaign

General Nicholas Alexander who launched an indepndent campaign for president only a mere half a month ago,. finally climbed into double digits this morning after a struggle to remain known. He and Frank Woodside in a ticket are currently running at 13% in poll of polls. His bump in the olls are especially well seen in the states of Florida, Maine and New Hampshire. Althiough Alexander would not win should the election be held toda, if he gains enough electoral votes in the electoral college from Florida, Alaska, Maine, New Hampshire, and the map stays the way it was in 2006 switching California for Texas, Missouri and probably New York for Walken, and the exceptions above, then Alexander could succeed in throwing the election to the House of Representatives.
 
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newyorktimes.com, March 31st

Hobuck Dead

We now have reports that the senior Senator from Alabama, Jimmy Hobuck, 59, committed suicide late last night in his home. Hobuck was little-known outside of his home state, in spite of his run for President -- he dropped out in March of '09.

In an odd turn of events, this leaves the other Senator from Alabama, Cody Riley as the state's senior Senator. Riley, 38, is the youngest current member of the Senate.

Shallick for VP?

Governor Henry Shallick Jr., of Missouri, decided to pass on a presidential run in early in 2009 to run for a third term as Governor of Missouri. Yesterday, his wife, First Lady of Missouri Connie Shallick, campaigning for her husband, listed "he is being vetted for Veep" as one of the reasons her husband should be reelected.

The Governor's office quickly walked back the statement, claiming that Connie Shallick misspoke and meant to say "he deserves to be vetted for Veep."

Although Shallick is little-known outside of Missouri, he is well-known for his ambition within the state. He generated controversy in 2007 when he repealed the state's term-limits law, enabling his present run for a third term.

Walken couldn't pick Sallich as his Vice President because the electors cannot vote for a President and Vice President who are registered from the same state.
 
Walken couldn't pick Shallick as his Vice President because the electors cannot vote for a President and Vice President who are registered from the same state.

Only the 11 electors from Missouri couldn't vote for both Walken and Shallick, but all other states could (it's to prevent the early colonial electors from picking only their fellow statesmen). If Walken were to pick Shallick, Shallick would (presumably) have 11-less votes than Walken. If Walken were to win with less than 11 votes over the minimum (between 270 and 281 electors), then the VP election would be thrown to the House of Representatives, who would choose between Shallick and the second-place candidate, likely Santos' running mate (Tripplehorn, maybe?).

A same state ticket is unprecedented, and unlikely to occur in the near-future, but it's not unconstitutional. On the tv show, Hoynes once offered Santos a spot as his running mate (both Texans), which is the same situation (oddly, no one brought it up then). So the idea isn't unprecedented in the West Wing universe. However, most of that article ("Connie Shallick," Shallick's electoral history) doesn't jibe with past articles on Shallick and can effectively be treated as incorrect per our storyline.
 
Actually, that's incorrect. In the event of a tie, the House of Representatives chooses the President, while the Senate chooses the VP.
 
Actually, that's incorrect. In the event of a tie, the House of Representatives chooses the President, while the Senate chooses the VP.

Oh, thanks alot. I almost thought I knew what I was talking about.

It's all in the Twelfth Amendment of the US Constitution, specifically:
12th Amendment said:
The Electors shall meet in their respective states, and vote by ballot for President and Vice-President, one of whom, at least, shall not be an inhabitant of the same state with themselves
12th Amendment said:
The person having the greatest Number of votes for President, shall be the President, if such number be a majority of the whole number of Electors appointed; and if no person have such majority, then from the persons having the highest numbers not exceeding three on the list of those voted for as President, the House of Representatives shall choose immediately, by ballot, the President.
12th Amendment said:
...if such number be a majority of the whole number of Electors appointed, and if no person have a majority, then from the two highest numbers on the list, the Senate shall choose the Vice-President; a quorum for the purpose shall consist of two-thirds of the whole number of Senators, and a majority of the whole number shall be necessary to a choice. But no person constitutionally ineligible to the office of President shall be eligible to that of Vice-President of the United States.

So, yeah, Senate. Probably because (at least originally), the Vice President was President of the Senate and was expected to preside over the Senate most of the time (fat chance getting him to do that now). Originally, the Senate was just appointed by the States (legislatures), while the House was/is more representive of the people (directly elected).
 
Only the 11 electors from Missouri couldn't vote for both Walken and Shallick, but all other states could (it's to prevent the early colonial electors from picking only their fellow statesmen). If Walken were to pick Shallick, Shallick would (presumably) have 11-less votes than Walken. If Walken were to win with less than 11 votes over the minimum (between 270 and 281 electors), then the VP election would be thrown to the House of Representatives, who would choose between Shallick and the second-place candidate, likely Santos' running mate (Tripplehorn, maybe?).

A same state ticket is unprecedented, and unlikely to occur in the near-future, but it's not unconstitutional. On the tv show, Hoynes once offered Santos a spot as his running mate (both Texans), which is the same situation (oddly, no one brought it up then). So the idea isn't unprecedented in the West Wing universe. However, most of that article ("Connie Shallick," Shallick's electoral history) doesn't jibe with past articles on Shallick and can effectively be treated as incorrect per our storyline.

That's what I meant, I just didn't want to see you guy pick this guy and lose the 11 votes, I think it's going to be close and Walken will need everything he gets.

As for the other guy who said that the Senate picks the VP in a tie, that is right, but we are talking about the ticket having two people from the same state. If Walken did choose this guy it might end up a tie, that would be really cool, I think the GOP will take back the House anyway.
 
politico.com, Thursday April 8th

Shallick “Not in VP Running”

Missouri Governor Henry Shallick has told reporters that he is not under consideration for the Vice-Presidential slot on the Republican Presidential ticket of former acting President Glen Walken.

Shallick, who was speaking to reporters at his weekly press conference, described reports that he was a leading candidate for the Vice-Presidency as “fantasy”.

“I can assure the people of the Missouri that I’ll be serving a full second term as Governor. They already have a great Missourian running for President, so we need to get behind him, but an all Missouri ticket is not on the agenda.”

Governor Shallick who is serving as the national co-chair of the Walken campaign refused to be drawn on who was on Walken’s shortlist saying only “there are some great candidates and I know Glen will make a great choice.”
 
redstate.com, Thursday April 8th

Walken Hosting VP Gathering

The presumptive Republican nominee for President Glen Walken is to host a gathering of prospective Vice-Presidential candidates at his home in Missouri this weekend.

The full list of invitees is not yet known, but it’s believed that Minnesota Governor Michael Jack, Texas Senator Liz Clark and Utah Governor John Elderton will all be in attendance.

The meeting is scheduled to take place at the Walken residence in Liberty, MO and is believed to be focused on the former acting President getting to know a number of the candidates better though his spokesman said “It’s a meeting of senior party figures and there are a number of issues that will be discussed. It is not a job interview!”
 
INCOMPLETE : I've been working on this the last 10 hours or so. It's an attempt to make sense of the House of Representatives. I've gone through the entire thread and pulled out every Rep. I could find and added them in (what I believe) is an appropriate spot (more details below). I'm going to sleep now, but I want to make sure this isn't a fruitless endeavor. Are there any great mistakes or misassumptions that I need to know before I proceed? I have added only a few from Wikipedia's list, so almost all the names are just from this thread.

A (hopefully soon) complete list of Representatives in the House of Representatives.

The current makeup of the House, by party:
  • 215 Democrats (two of whom -- Harris and Wake -- are generally too ill to vote most of the time)
  • 215 Republicans
  • 4 Independents (Allen, Hanson, Wendt, and Woodside; Woodside likely still caucuses with the Democrats, Allen and Hanson caucus Democraticly slightly most of the time; Wendt caucuses with the Republicans)
  • 1 "Independent Democrat" (Templeton, who despite being a "Southern Democrat" always caucuses with the Republicans)

Discounting Harris, Wake, Allen, and Hanson, the Democrats can only count on 214 votes. The Republicans on the other hand, because of two Independents always on their side, can count on 217 votes. That's a very odd situation, given that the Democrats are nominally the majority party. Given that alot of Republicans seem very moderate or even liberal in the WW universe, I assume that's what keeps the slim majority's band-aid on.

In August 2009, there was a vacant seat in New York (587), but I assume it's been filled since then, as it's been almost a year. It was stated a few times that the Democratic majority was 1 (probably counting the caucused Independents), but Peters' party-switch last February brought it "down to 1," so I take it that the New York seat had been filled by a Democrat shortly before then. Woodside's recent switch to Independent status means that Republicans and Democrats are technically neck-and-neck, but Woodside still caucuses with the Dems.

I've done a lot of guesswork in placing them in appropriate districts (educated I hope, but some mistakes can be the usual WW come from behind stories). The main thing is to get to the magical 215-215 number. I've italicized the characters I took from WP's politican list and have not been mentioned on the show. The remaining (XXX -- to be added when I complete) representatives, I have not named (to keep the creativity), but plan on updating this list in the future as more are added, more events occur.

Alabama (AL)
  1. to be added
  2. to be added
  3. to be added
  4. to be added
  5. to be added
  6. to be added
  7. Ralph Neonakis (WP)

Alaska (AK)
  • Franklin Woodside (1423; at-large)

Arizona (AZ)
  1. to be added
  2. to be added
  3. Louise MacDonald (299; Deputy Minority Whip)
  4. to be added
  5. to be added
  6. Jack Darnell (201)
  7. to be added
  8. to be added

Arkansas (AR)
  1. to be added
  2. to be added
  3. to be added
  4. Hubert "Arkansas" Smith (WP)

California (CA)
  1. to be added
  2. to be added
  3. to be added
  4. to be added
  5. Julianne Wake (587)
  6. to be added
  7. to be added
  8. Jack Caton (1027)
  9. to be added
  10. to be added
  11. to be added
  12. to be added
  13. to be added
  14. to be added
  15. to be added
  16. to be added
  17. to be added
  18. to be added
  19. to be added
  20. to be added
  21. to be added
  22. to be added
  23. to be added
  24. to be added
  25. to be added
  26. to be added
  27. to be added
  28. to be added
  29. to be added
  30. to be added
  31. to be added
  32. to be added
  33. to be added
  34. to be added
  35. to be added
  36. to be added
  37. to be added
  38. to be added
  39. to be added
  40. to be added
  41. to be added
  42. Aaron Holmes (1206)
  43. to be added
  44. to be added
  45. to be added
  46. to be added
  47. Waylon Johns (1176; mistakenly stated to be in the 48th District, but represents Seaborn's district [47th])
  48. to be added
  49. to be added
  50. to be added
  51. to be added
  52. to be added
  53. to be added

Colorado (CO)
  1. to be added
  2. to be added
  3. Harper Colfax (1206)
  4. to be added
  5. to be added
  6. to be added
  7. to be added

Connecticut (CT)
  1. to be added
  2. to be added
  3. Blane Daniels (582)
  4. Mackenzie Allen (23)
  5. Earl Brennan (971)

Delaware (DE)
  • to be added

Florida (FL)
  1. Lawrence Locke (642)
  2. to be added
  3. to be added
  4. to be added
  5. to be added
  6. to be added
  7. to be added
  8. to be added
  9. to be added
  10. to be added
  11. Lucy Royle (1504)
  12. to be added
  13. to be added
  14. to be added
  15. Kay Mort (1172)
  16. to be added
  17. Carol Gelsey (300)
  18. Glen Stanley (1504)
  19. to be added
  20. John Tandy (574)
  21. James Ritchie (1050)
  22. to be added
  23. to be added
  24. to be added
  25. to be added

Georgia (GA)
  1. to be added
  2. to be added
  3. to be added
  4. Stoker Hanson (1282)
  5. to be added
  6. to be added
  7. to be added
  8. to be added
  9. to be added
  10. to be added
  11. to be added
  12. to be added
  13. to be added

Hawaii (HI)
  1. to be added
  2. to be added

Idaho (ID)
  1. Jim Arkin (228; House Minority Leader)
  2. to be added

Illinois (IL)
  1. Todd Evers (621)
  2. to be added
  3. to be added
  4. to be added
  5. Mary Maskaleris (621)
  6. to be added
  7. John Baxley (WP)
  8. to be added
  9. to be added
  10. to be added
  11. James Newhouse (524)
  12. to be added
  13. to be added
  14. to be added
  15. to be added
  16. to be added
  17. to be added
  18. to be added
  19. to be added

Indiana (IN)
  1. Tom Peterson (1550)
  2. John Greene (1550)
  3. Mark Stillman (1550)
  4. Richard Krause (1550)
  5. Dale Burger (1550)
  6. Mitchell Harris (1550)
  7. Olivia Buckland (1550)
  8. Rick Enders (1550)
  9. Brad Stone (1550)

Iowa (IA)
  1. to be added
  2. to be added
  3. John Martin (534)
  4. to be added
  5. to be added

Kansas (KS)
  1. to be added
  2. to be added
  3. Jardine Mantell (789)
  4. to be added

Kentucky (KY)
(note: Lamons is the only Democrat in Kentucky, per 823)
  1. to be added
  2. to be added
  3. Raymond Lamons (823)
  4. to be added
  5. to be added
  6. to be added

Louisiana (LA)
  1. to be added
  2. to be added
  3. Rebecca Goldman (201)
  4. to be added
  5. to be added
  6. to be added
  7. to be added

Maine (ME)
  1. to be added
  2. to be added

Maryland (MD)
  1. to be added
  2. to be added
  3. to be added
  4. to be added
  5. to be added
  6. to be added
  7. to be added
  8. Andi Wyatt (325)

Massachusetts (MA)
  1. Mark Sellner (198; Speaker of the House)
  2. to be added
  3. to be added
  4. to be added
  5. to be added
  6. to be added
  7. to be added
  8. to be added
  9. to be added
  10. to be added

Michigan (MI)
  1. Becky Reeseman (325; note: mistakenly referred to as an Illinois Congresswoman on 534)
  2. to be added
  3. to be added
  4. John Brennan (536)
  5. to be added
  6. to be added
  7. to be added
  8. Darren Gibson (266; from Lansing)
  9. to be added
  10. to be added
  11. to be added
  12. to be added
  13. to be added
  14. to be added
  15. to be added

Minnesota (MN)
  1. to be added
  2. to be added
  3. to be added
  4. to be added
  5. to be added
  6. Janine Miller (1224)
  7. to be added
  8. Jarod Samuels (730)

Mississippi (MS)
  1. to be added
  2. to be added
  3. to be added
  4. to be added

Missouri (MO)
  1. to be added
  2. to be added
  3. to be added
  4. to be added
  5. to be added
  6. Glen Allen Walken (48)
  7. to be added
  8. to be added
  9. David Owens (325)

Montana (MT)
  • Scott Lynch (847; at-large)

Nebraska (NE)
  1. to be added
  2. to be added
  3. to be added

Nevada (NV)
  1. to be added
  2. to be added
  3. to be added

New Hampshire (NH)
  1. Benjamin Benoit (WP)
  2. to be added

New Jersey (NJ)
  1. to be added
  2. to be added
  3. to be added
  4. to be added
  5. to be added
  6. to be added
  7. to be added
  8. to be added
  9. Harvey Lewton (1206)
  10. to be added
  11. to be added
  12. to be added
  13. Annie Long (299)

New Mexico (NM)
  1. Steven Scott (1504)
  2. to be added
  3. Simeon Ratner (1504)

New York (NY)
  1. Joe Calhoun (WP)
  2. to be added
  3. Jack Johnson (1078)
  4. to be added
  5. to be added
  6. to be added
  7. Jane Calhoun (524)
  8. to be added
  9. to be added
  10. to be added
  11. to be added
  12. to be added
  13. to be added
  14. to be added
  15. to be added
  16. to be added
  17. Martin Reid (958)
  18. to be added
  19. to be added
  20. to be added
  21. to be added
  22. to be added
  23. to be added
  24. to be added
  25. Tom Phelps (1206)
  26. Andrew Casey (201)
  27. to be added
  28. to be added
  29. Frank Whitley (1423)

North Carolina (NC)
  1. Sue Borden (WP)
  2. Brett Logan (844; mistakenly referred to as a Republican in 1423)
  3. Nick Jarrett (580)
  4. to be added
  5. Bertram Coles (356)
  6. to be added
  7. to be added
  8. to be added
  9. to be added
  10. to be added
  11. Barbara Layton (1095)
  12. to be added
  13. to be added

North Dakota (ND)
  • to be added

Ohio (OH)
  1. to be added
  2. to be added
  3. to be added
  4. to be added
  5. to be added
  6. Brett Radford (1206)
  7. to be added
  8. Robert Mitchell (299)
  9. to be added
  10. Justin Willis (1413)
  11. to be added
  12. to be added
  13. to be added
  14. to be added
  15. Ruth Norton-Stewart (1376)
  16. to be added
  17. Jim Marino (847)
  18. to be added

Oklahoma (OK)
  1. to be added
  2. to be added
  3. to be added
  4. to be added
  5. Darryl Lukins (398)

Oregon (OR)
  1. Arthur Carney (WP)
  2. to be added
  3. to be added
  4. Will Bailey (66)
  5. Karl Blinken (WP)

Pennsylvania (PA)
  1. to be added
  2. Arthur Cornforth (663)
  3. to be added
  4. to be added
  5. to be added
  6. to be added
  7. to be added
  8. to be added
  9. to be added
  10. to be added
  11. to be added
  12. to be added
  13. to be added
  14. to be added
  15. to be added
  16. to be added
  17. to be added
  18. Joseph Bruno (1082)
  19. to be added

Rhode Island (RI)
  1. to be added
  2. to be added

South Carolina (SC)
  1. Max Johns (732)
  2. Sam Wendt (10; thrown out of the GOP, likely still caucuses with them)
  3. Nathan Templeton (121; refers to himself as a Democrat, but caucuses with the Republicans)
  4. Susan Day (1505)
  5. Sam McCord (440)
  6. Grant Spencer (1505)

South Dakota (SD)
  • to be added

Tennessee (TN)
  1. to be added
  2. to be added
  3. to be added
  4. Harvey Mann (1206)
  5. Dick Rollins (961)
  6. to be added
  7. to be added
  8. to be added
  9. to be added

Texas (TX)
  1. to be added
  2. to be added
  3. to be added
  4. to be added
  5. to be added
  6. to be added
  7. Mark Cumberland (456)
  8. to be added
  9. Patsy Burns (452)
  10. to be added
  11. to be added
  12. John Peters (1282)
  13. to be added
  14. to be added
  15. to be added
  16. to be added
  17. to be added
  18. to be added
  19. to be added
  20. to be added
  21. to be added
  22. to be added
  23. to be added
  24. to be added
  25. to be added
  26. to be added
  27. to be added
  28. to be added
  29. Tim Fields (452)
  30. to be added
  31. to be added
  32. to be added

Utah (UT)
  1. to be added
  2. Paul Deaborn (325)
  3. to be added

Vermont (VT)
  • Matt Skinner (12; at-large)

Virginia (VA)
  1. to be added
  2. to be added
  3. to be added
  4. Colvin Newman (580)
  5. to be added
  6. to be added
  7. to be added
  8. to be added
  9. Noah Gellman (201; mistakenly referred to as White House Communications Director twice [that's Noah Crichton])
  10. 10th District Congressman (Governor Buchanan's replacement)
  11. to be added

Washington (WA)
  1. to be added
  2. to be added
  3. to be added
  4. to be added
  5. Jeff Haffley (1)
  6. to be added
  7. to be added
  8. to be added
  9. to be added

West Virginia (WV)
  1. to be added
  2. to be added
  3. to be added

Wisconsin (WI)
  1. to be added
  2. Bud Watchell (524)
  3. to be added
  4. to be added
  5. to be added
  6. to be added
  7. to be added
  8. to be added

Wyoming (WY)
  • Kevin Harris (587; at-large)
 
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LONDON
Thursday April 8th

Mayoral Electoral poll by Borough

  1. Barking and Dagenham= Fox 28%, Stanley 27%, Brooks 25%, Reed 12%, Blake 5% Pearson 3%
  2. Barnet= Reed 31%, Fox 27%, Blake 16%, Stanley 14%, Brooks 8%, Pearson 4%
  3. Bexley= Reed 41%, Pearson 18%, Fox 17%, Blake 12%, Brooks 7%, Stanley 5%
  4. Brent= Stanley 32%, Fox 28%, Blake 21%, Reed 12%, Brooks 4%, Pearson 3%
  5. Bromley= Reed 39%, Fox 27%, Pearson 14%, Blake 11%, Brooks 7%, Stanley 2%
  6. Camden= Fox 28%, Stanley 26%, Blake 18%, Reed 15%, Brooks 8%, Pearson 5%
  7. City of London= Reed 52%, Fox, 15%, Blake 14%, Stanley 7%, Pearson 7%, Brooks 5%
  8. Croydon= Reed 31%, Fox 27%, Stanley 21%, Blake 11%, Brooks 6%, Pearson 4%
  9. Ealing= Fox 28%, Stanley 26%, Reed 21%, Blake 13%, Brooks 7%, Pearson 5%
  10. Enfield=Reed 39%, Fox 28%, Stanley 13%, Blake 12%, Brooks 5%, Pearson 3%
  11. Greenwich= Fox 25%, Stanley 24%, Reed 23%, Blake 17%, Pearson 5%, Brooks 4%
  12. Hackney= Stanley 33%, Fox 25%, Blake 19%, Brooks 13%, Reed 8%, Pearson 2%
  13. Hammersmith= Fox 32%, Reed 27%, Stanley 22%, Blake 9%, Brooks 7%, Pearson 3%
  14. Harigney= Stanley 32%, Fox 26%, Blake 16%, Brooks 15%, Reed 9%, Pearson 2%
  15. Harrow= Stanley 29%, Reed 27%, Fox 26%, Blake 9%, Brooks 6%, Pearson 3%
  16. Havering=Reed 33%, Fox 26%, Stanley 18%, Brooks 14%, Blake 7%, Pearson 2%
  17. Hillingdon= Reed 46%, Fox 22%, Stanley 14%, Blake 13%, Pearson 3%, Brooks 2%
  18. Hounslow= Fox 31%, Reed 29%, Stanley 22%, Blake 9%, Brooks 6%, Pearson 3%
  19. Islington= Stanley 28%, Fox 27%, Blake 21%, Reed 17%, Brooks 6%, Pearson 2%
  20. Kensington and Chelsea= Reed 52%, Fox 19%, Blake 15%, Pearson9%, Brooks 3%, Stanley 2%
  21. Kingston = Reed 44%, Blake 22%, Fox 19%, Stanley 9%, Pearson 4%, Brooks 2%
  22. Lambeth= Fox 28%, Stanley 27%, Blake 21%, Reed 17%, Brooks 5%, Pearson 2%
  23. Lewisham=Fox 28%, Reed 26%, Stanley 25%, Brooks 12%, Blake 7%, Pearson 2%
  24. Merton=Reed 36%, Fox 25%, Stanley 16%, Blake 15%, Brooks 6%, Pearson 2%
  25. Newham= Fox 28%, Stanley 27%, Brooks 19%, Blake 13%, Reed 11%, Pearson 2%
  26. Redbridge=Reed 31%, Fox 28%, Stanley 21%, Brooks 11%, Blake 7%, Pearson 2%
  27. Richmond= Reed 39%, Fox 24%, Blake 22%, Stanley 8%, Brooks 4%, Pearson 3%
  28. Southwark= Fox 27%, Blake 26%, Stanley 24%, Reed 17%, Brooks 4%,Pearson 2%
  29. Sutton=Reed 37%, Blake 27%, Fox 22%, Stanley 8%, Pearson 5%, Brooks 1%
  30. Tower Hamlets= Stanley 26%, Fox 24%, Brooks 23%, Blake 14%, Reed 11%, Pearson 2%
  31. Waltham Forest= Fox 28%, Reed 25%, Stanley 25%, Brooks 11%, Blake 9%, Pearson 2%
  32. Wandsworth= Reed 59%, Fox 16%, Stanley 13%, Blake 6%, Brooks 4%, Pearson 2%
  33. Westminister=Reed 59%, Fox 18%, Stanley 11%, Blake 6%, Pearson 3%, Brooks 1%
Boroughs by candidate
Reed ahead in 16
Fox ahead in 11
Stanley ahead in 6
Average across the Boroughs by Candidate
Reed 29.57
Fox 25.O6
Stanley 19.3O
Blake 14.O3
Brooks 8.21
Pearson 3.83

The Borough average is showing a bigger lead for Reed than the London wide Polls. Fox is just below the London wide Poll, Stanley around six below, with Blake around seven ahead in the average, Brooks just ahead, and Pearson below.
 
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Thursday April 8th
Breaking News Breaking News
McCorry appoints State Senate Republican Miniority Leader Garland to the Senate
Alabama Governor John McCorry has made an major suprise by announcing that he has appointed State Senate Miniority Leader Alan Garland to the US Senate following the suicide of Senior Senator Jimmy Holbuck last week.
Garland 62, is a shock choice with many believing that McGorry would appoint Former Governor Wesley Burke, a favourite of the right to the job, but it is well known that McCorry has a bitter dislike for Burke.
Garland who represents the 16th Districts in the state Senate is almost un-known even within his own state.
McCorry told a press Conference in Birmingham, "Alan is the best man for the job, he has over fourty years exprience in serving our great state, in the Alabama House of Represenatives, and since 1998 in the State Senate".
MCorry was flanked by his son in law, Senator Cody Riley who at just 37 becomes the States Senior Senator, even though he is 24 years younger than Garland.
Garland has also agreed to run for the seat at the General Election on November 2nd, although there are already strong rumors that Wesley Burke will challenge him in a primary.




 
James Rebhorn as Alan Garland, the new Junior Senator from Alabama
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thehill.com, Thursday April 8th

Burke: I will challenge Garland in November

In a bizarre press conference, hastily arranged and hosted on the back of one his supporter’s trucks former Alabama Governor Wes Burke has announced that he will challenge appointed Senator Alan Garland for the Republican nomination.

Burke, who was reportedly furious at finding out he was overlooked for the seat whilst watching TV this afternoon, said “Governor McCrory has appointed a yes man to represent our great state in Washington, and I don’t think that’s good enough. I think it’s my duty to ensure that the state gets the kind of top level representation it deserves, and as such I will be seeking to win the primary.”

Governor Burke's announcement came a matter of hours after Governor McCrory had revealed that he had selected State Senator Alan Garland to fill the seat vacated by the death of Senator Jimmy Hobuck.

The primary election is scheduled for August and may see further candidates emerge including Montgomery Mayor Christine McCracken who is a known political opponent of Governor McCrory and was believed to be considering a gubernatorial primary challenge in 2012.
 
Tim Thomason-
Good work on the House of Representatives list! Must have been a nightmare to finish. :)
One question though-You've listed GlenAllen Walken as the Congressman for the Missouri 6th District. While that's the district he represented, neither canon or the earlier threads ever said if he got reelected to his old seat, and all of the references call him "Former Acting President and Speaker of the House."
Could you please clarify?
Thank you,
W49.
 
Westbrook - it was mentioned in one of the earliest posts that Walken had returned to Congress, but everything subsequent only really hinted at it.

I don't think he's been refered to as Congressman Walken at any point. The general rule I've had has been for his campaign refer to him as "President Walken" whilst the White House tend to call him "Speaker" or "Mr.Walken".
 
LONDON
Thursday April 8th

Candidates clash in first Myaoral debate

The six candidates for London Mayor have gone head to head for the first time tonight at the London School of Economics.
The first suprise came when Gerald Fox, Henry Reed, Ben Stanley, Joesphine Blake, and Guy Pearson agreed to debate with Arthur Brooks, although all the other candidates did shake hands with each other expect Brooks.
Henry Reed was asked why he was standing of the post of London Mayor when he had attacked the creation of the position when it was included in the Labour maniefsto in 1996.
"Simply, I got that wrong. In the right hands London Mayor is a great job, and it was a right choice to create it".
Current Mayor Gerald Fox asked voters to judge him on his four years in City Hall.
The most bitter exchanges can between Henry Reed and Ben Stanley
Reed attacked Stanley's comments made over the years on everything from the Soviet Union, Israel, taxes and strikes. Stanley hit back staying those comments where "the past,voters wanted to hear about the future", but Reed hit back "That's fine then stop attacking my record at Number Ten then".
In one amazing squence both Reed and Fox seemed to join together attacking Stanley espically over his failure to back the bid to bring the Olympic games "You just can't blame the Conservatives, you failed to back the bid when we where in office the year before" Fox told Stanley.
The clashes with Brooks where mostly low key, although again Reed got in a line saying he shared a lot in common with Stanley, including state ownership, nationalsation of banks, and anti-Jewish remarks.
Guy Pearson and Reed clashed over Europe but he looked out of sorts.
Joesphine Blake made an appeal to Green voters to back her, rather than Stanley who had endorsed by them.
There are another two debates to go before election day on May 6th.
 
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Westbrook - it was mentioned in one of the earliest posts that Walken had returned to Congress, but everything subsequent only really hinted at it.

I don't think he's been refered to as Congressman Walken at any point. The general rule I've had has been for his campaign refer to him as "President Walken" whilst the White House tend to call him "Speaker" or "Mr.Walken".
It's practice to refer to the person as the highest office they have ever attained no matter what office they currently hold.
 
I'm still not really sure about "President Walken" - he was acting president only, and those Vice President's who have become acting president still remain "Mr Vice President" or "Vice President Cheney".
 
Peter - I tend to agree, but I think due to the events of "The Stormy Present", it suggests things are slightly different to OTL.

Walken is refered to as "President" in the episode and gets all of the trimmings of a former President - travelling on Air Force One to the funeral for example.

I'm sure there are better informed people than me on the subject ere, but my understanding is that Walken wouldn't have been sworn in as President to become acting President (much like Cheney in when he was acting President briefly). However, on the show he was sworn in so would effectively be President.
 
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