1976: Carter's Perfect Storm

Senator Hayden - I can't see it.
In the type of anti-war environment we're talking about, I do think it's quite possible. Plus, there's a bit more context I'm gonna give.

As anyone who's read my other TL, they know I absolutely love to add in a lot of context and changes prior to the big PoD, and I think it'll make sense.

Any special concern with Hayden in particular?
 
It mentions Carter was McGovern's 1972 running mate- so did the ticket win Georgia?
Considering the fact that Nixon went full in with the Southern Strategy in 1972 plus McGovern's liberalism, the answer is no, but the margin of loss in Georgia will be in the single digits, while in the rest of the South it will still be in the double digits, but it'll start with a "1" rather than a "2".
 
Pop Culture Awards
Sorry for the delay. I had one hell of a time going through the Wiki articles for all the awards since I wanted to be extra thorough. At some point I just have to give up, I'll probably edit a few of these and fill in the asterisks somedya, but for the most part, these are final.
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Saturday, January 29, 1977: Golden Globes
Best Motion Picture
  1. Drama: Rocky
  2. Comedy or Musical: A Star is Born
Best Performance in a Motion Picture – Drama
  1. Actor: Sylvester Stallone — Rocky as Rocky Balboa
  2. Actress: Susan Sarandon — Rocky as Adrian Pennino
Best Performance in a Motion Picture – Comedy or Musical
  1. Actor: Elvis Presley - A Star is Born as John Howard
  2. Actress: Barbara Streisand - A Star is Born as Esther Hoffman
Best Supporting Performance in a Motion Picture – Drama, Comedy or Musical
  1. Supporting Actor: Henry Fonda — All the President's Men as Ben Bradlee
  2. Supporting Actress: Jodie Foster — Taxi Driver as Iris "Easy" Steensma
Other
  1. Best Director: John G. Avildsen - Rocky
  2. Best Screenplay: Rocky - Sylvester Stallone
  3. Best Original Score: Rocky — Bill Conti
  4. Best Original Song: "Evergreen" (Barbra Streisand, Paul Williams) – A Star Is Born
  5. Best Foreign Film: *
  6. Best Documentary Film: *
  7. New Star of the Year - Actor: Arnold Schwarzenegger – Stay Hungry as Joe Santo
  8. New Star of the Year - Actress: Jessica LangeKing Kong as Dwan/Melinda DillonBound for Glory as Mary / Memphis Sue/Mariel HemingwayLipstick as Christine McCormick
Television
  1. Best Series — Drama: Charlie's Angels
  2. Best Series — Comedy or Musical: M*A*S*H
  3. Best Television Film: Eleanor and Franklin
  4. Best Actor — Drama Series: Lee Majors — The Six Million Dollar Man
  5. Best Actress — Drama Series: Farrah Fawcett — Charlie's Angels/Priscilla Presley — Charlie's Angels
  6. Best Actor — Comedy or Musical Series: Alan Alda — M*A*S*H/Sammy Davis, Jr. — Sammy and Company
  7. Best Actress — Comedy or Musical Series: Isabel Sanford — The Jeffersons
  8. Best Supporting Actor: Harrison Ford — All in the Family
  9. Best Supporting Actress: Sally Struthers — All in the Family
February 19, 1977: Grammy Awards
  1. Record of the Year: 50 Ways to Leave Your Lover - Paul Simon (artist and producer) & Phil Ramone (producer)/I Write the Songs - Barry Manilow (artist and producer) & Ron Dante (producer)
  2. Album of the Year: Songs in the Key of Life - Stevie Wonder (artist) & Stevie Wonder (producer)
  3. Song of the Year: "I Write the Songs" - Bruce Johnston (songwriter) (for performed by Barry Manilow)
  4. Best New Artist: The Brothers Johnson
  5. Best Recording for Children: The Adventures of Ali and His Gang vs. Mr. Tooth Decay – Muhammad Ali
  6. Best Classical Orchestral Performance: *
  7. Best Classical Vocal Soloist Performance: Beverly Sills for Herbert: Music of Victor Herbert
  8. Best Opera Recording: Michael Woolcock (producer), Lorin Maazel (conductor), Leona Mitchell, Willard White & the Cleveland Orchestra for Gershwin: Porgy and Bess
  9. Best Choral Performance (other than opera): André Previn (conductor), Arthur Oldham (choirmaster) & the London Symphony Orchestra & Chorus for Rachmaninoff: The Bells
  10. Best Classical Performance, Instrumental Soloist or Soloists (with orchestra): André Previn (conductor), Arthur Oldham (choir director) & the London Symphony Orchestra & Chorus for Rachmaninoff: The Bells
  11. Best Classical Performance, Instrumental Soloist or Soloists (without orchestra): Strauss: Lazar Berman for Liszt: Legendary Soviet Pianist Lazar Berman Plays Liszt
  12. Best Chamber Music Performance: *
  13. Best Classical Album: *
  14. Best Comedy Recording: Richard Pryor for Bicentennial Nigger
  15. Best Instrumental Composition: Chuck Mangione (composer) for Bellavia
  16. Album of Best Original Score Written for a Motion Picture or Television Special: Taxi Driver – Bernard Herrmann
  17. Best Instrumental Arrangement: Chick Corea (arranger) for "Leprechaun's Dream"
  18. Best Arrangement Accompanying Vocalist(s): James William Guercio & Jimmie Haskell (arrangers) for "If You Leave Me Now" performed by Chicago
  19. Best Arrangement for Voices (duo, group or chorus): Queen for Bohemian Rhapsody
  20. Best Country Vocal Performance, Female: Dolly Parton — "All I Can Do"
  21. Best Country Vocal Performance, Male: Willie Nelson – "I'd Have to Be Crazy"
  22. Best Country Vocal Performance by a Duo or Group: Loretta Lynn, Conway Twitty for "The Letter"
  23. Best Country Instrumental Performance: Chet Atkins & Les Paul for Chester and Lester
  24. Best Country Song: Larry Gatlin (songwriter) for "Broken Lady"
  25. Best Ethnic or Traditional Recording: Proud Earth - Chief Dan George, Arliene Nofchissey Williams & Rick Brousseau
  26. Best Gospel Performance (other than soul gospel): The Oak Ridge Boys for "Where the Soul Never Dies"
  27. Best Soul Gospel Performance: Mahalia Jackson for How I Got Over
  28. Best Inspirational Performance: Willie Nelson for Amazing Grace'
  29. Best Jazz Performance by a Soloist (Instrumental): Count Basie for Basie & Zoot
  30. Best Jazz Performance by a Group: Chick Corea for The Leprechaun
  31. Best Jazz Performance by a Big Band: Duke Ellington for The Ellington Suites
  32. Best Jazz Vocal Performance: Ella Fitzgerald for Fitzgerald and Pass... Again
  33. Best Latin Recording: Salsa - Soundtrack by Fania All-Stars
  34. Best Cast Show Album: My Fair Lady
  35. Best Album Package: Hipgnosis and Hardie for Presence, performed by Led Zeppelin
  36. Best Album Notes: Francis Robinson for Caruso: A Legendary Performer, performed by Enrico Caruso
  37. Best Pop Vocal Performance, Female: Natalie Cole — Natalie
  38. Best Pop Vocal Performance, Male: Songs in the Key of Life (album) - Stevie Wonder
  39. Best Pop Vocal Performance by a Duo, Group or Chorus: "Bohemian Rhapsody" — Queen
  40. Best Pop Instrumental Performance: Stevie Wonder — "Contusion"
  41. Best Engineered Recording, Non-Classical: Somewhere I've Never Travelled (Ambrosia) — Alan Parsons & Tom Trefethen, engineers/Tales of Mystery and Imagination (The Alan Parsons Project) — Alan Parsons, engineer
  42. Best Engineered Recording, Classical: Gershwin: Rhapsody in Blue - Edward (Bud) T. Graham, Milton Cherin, Ray Moore (engineers)
  43. Best Producer of the Year: Stevie Wonder
  44. Best R&B Vocal Performance, Female: Aretha Franklin – "Something He Can Feel"
  45. Best R&B Vocal Performance, Male: Stevie Wonder for "I Wish"
  46. Best R&B Vocal Performance by a Duo, Group or Chorus: Earth, Wind & Fire for "Gratitude"
  47. Best R&B Instrumental Performance: Marvin Gaye for "After the Dance"
  48. Best Rhythm & Blues Song: Pam Sawyer & Marilyn McLeod for "Love Hangover" (Diana Ross)
  49. Best Spoken Word Recording: Henry Fonda, Helen Hayes, James Earl Jones & Orson Welles for Great American Documents
Monday, March 28, 1977: Academy Awards
  1. Best Picture: RockyRobert Chartoff and Irwin Winkler, producers
    double-dagger

  2. Best Director: John G. Avildsen – Rocky
  3. Best Actor: Sylvester Stallone – Rocky as Rocky Balboa
  4. Best Actress: Susan Sarandon – Rocky as Adrian Pennino
  5. Best Supporting Actor: Burgess Meredith - Rocky as "Mickey" Goldmill/Burt Young - Rocky as Paulie Pennino
  6. Best Supporting Actress: Jodie Foster - Taxi Driver as Iris Steensma
  7. Best Screenplay Written Directly for the Screen Based on Factual Material or on Story Material Not Previously Published or Produced: Rocky – Sylvester Stallone
  8. Best Screenplay Based on Material from Another Medium: All the President's Men – William Goldman based on the book by Carl Bernstein and Bob Woodward
  9. Best Foreing Language Film: They Fought For Their Motherland (Soviet Union)
  10. Best Documentary Feature: Harlan County, USA – Barbara Kopple/Hollywood on Trial – David Helpern
  11. Best Documentary Short Subject: *
  12. Best Live Action Short Film: *
  13. Best Animated Short Film: *
  14. Best Original Score: Taxi Driver – Bernard Herrmann (posthumous nomination)
  15. Best Original Song Score and Its Adaptation or Adaptation Score: A Star is Born - Roger Kellaway
  16. Best Original Song: "Gonna Fly Now" from Rocky – Music by Bill Conti; Lyrics by Carol Connors and Ayn Robbins
  17. Best Sound: Rocky - Harry Warren Tetrick(posthumous nomination), William McCaughey, Lyle Burbridge and Bud Alper
  18. Best Costume Design: Bound for Glory – William Ware Theiss
  19. Best Art Direction: All the President's Men – Art Direction: George Jenkins; Set Decoration: George Gaines
  20. Best Cinematography: A Star is Born - Rober Surtees
  21. Best Film Editing: Rocky - Rhicard Halsey and Scott Conrad

June 5, 1977: Tony Awards
1. Best Play: For Colored Girls Who Have Considered Suicide / When the Rainbow Is Enuf – Ntozake Shange
2. Best Musical: Annie
3. Most Innovative Production of a Revival: *
4. Best Book of a Musical: Thomas Meehan – Annie
5. Best Perfomance by a Leading Actor in a Play: Al Pacino – The Basic Training of Pavlo Hummel as Pavlo Hummel
6. Best Perfomance by a Leading Actress in a Play: Colleen Dewhurst – Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf? as Martha
7. Best Performance by a Leading Actor in a Musical: Reid Shelton - Annie as Oliver Warbucks
8. Best Performance by a Leading Actress in a Musical: Dorothy Loudon – Annie as Miss Hannigan/Andrea McArdle - Annie as Annie
9. Best Performance by a Featured Actor in a Play: Joe Fields – The Basic Training of Pavlo Hummel as First Sergeant Tower
10. Best Performance by a Featured Actress in a Play: Trazana Beverley – For Colored Girls Who Have Considered Suicide / When the Rainbow Is Enuf as Lady in Red
11. Best Performance by a Featured Actor in a Musical: *
12. Best Performance by a Featured Actress in a Musical: *
13. Best Direction of a Play: *
14. Best Direction of a Musical: Martin Charnin – Annie
15. Best Original Score (Music and/or Lyrics) Written for the Theatre: Annie – Charles Strouse (music) and Martin Charnin (lyrics)
16. Best Choreography: Peter Gennaro – Annie
17. Best Scenic Design: David Mitchell – Annie
18. Best Costume Design: Theoni V. Aldredge – Annie
19. Best Lighting Design: *

Sunday, Septwember 11, 1977: Primetime Emmy Awards
  1. Outstanding Comedy Series: M*A*S*H, (CBS)
  2. Outstanding Drama Series: Columbo, (NBC)
  3. Outstanding Comedy-Variety or Music Series: The Muppet Show, (Syndicated)
  4. Outstanding Special - Comedy-Variety or Music: The Barry Manilow Special, (ABC)
  5. Outstanding Special - Drama or Comedy: Eleanor and Franklin: The White House Years, (ABC)
  6. Outstanding Limited Series: Roots, (ABC)
  7. Outstanding Lead Actor in a Comedy Series: Alan Alda as Hawkeye Pierce on M*A*S*H, (CBS)
  8. Outstanding Lead Actress in a Comedy Series: Jean Stapleton as Edith Bunker on All in the Family, (CBS)
  9. Outstanding Lead Actor in a Drama Series: Peter Falk as Lt. Columbo on Columbo (NBC)
  10. Outstanding Lead Actress in a Drama Series: Priscilla Presley as Sabrina Duncan on Charlie's Angels, (ABC)
  11. Outstanding Lead Actor in a Special Program - Drama or Comedy: Edward Herrmann as President Franklin D. Roosevelt on Eleanor and Franklin: The White House Years, (ABC)
  12. Outstanding Lead Actress in a Special Program - Drama or Comedy: Jane Alexander as Eleanor Roosevelt on Eleanor and Franklin: The White House Years, (ABC)
  13. Outstanding Lead Actor in a Limited Series: Christopher Plummer as Roscoe Heyward on Arthur Hailey's the Moneychangers (NBC)
  14. Outstanding Lead Actress in a Limited Series: Susan Flannery as Margot Bracken on Arthur Hailey's the Moneychangers, (PBS)
  15. Outstanding Continuing Performance by a Supporting Actor in a Comedy Series: Gary Burghoff as Radar O'Reilly on M*A*S*H, (CBS)/Harry Morgan as Sherman T. Potter on M*A*S*H, (CBS)
  16. Outstanding Continuing Performance by a Supporting Actress in a Comedy Series: Loretta Swit as Margaret Houlihan on M*A*S*H, (CBS)
  17. Outstanding Continuing Performance by a Supporting Actor in a Drama Series: David Doyle as John Bosley on Charlie's Angels, (ABC)
  18. Outstanding Continuing Performance by a Supporting Actress in a Drama Series: Ellen Corby as Esther Walton on The Waltons, (CBS)
  19. Outstanding Performance by a Supporting Actor in a Comedy or Drama Special: Mark Harmon as Robert Dunlap on Eleanor and Franklin: The White House Years, (ABC)/Walter McGinn as Louis Howe on Eleanor and Franklin: The White House Years, (ABC)
  20. Outstanding Performance by a Supporting Actress in a Comedy or Drama Special: Rosemary Murphy as Sara Delano Roosevelt on Eleanor and Franklin: The White House Years, (ABC)
  21. Outstanding Lead Actor for a Single Appearance in a Drama or Comedy Series: Louis Gossett Jr. as Fiddler on Roots, (Episode: "Part IV"), (ABC)/John Amos as Toby on Roots, (Episode: "Part V"), (ABC)/LeVar Burton as Kunta Kinte on Roots, (Episode: "Part I"), (ABC)/Ben Vereen as "Chicken" George Moore on Roots, (Episode: "Part VI"), (ABC)
  22. Outstanding Lead Actress for a Single Appearance in a Drama or Comedy Series: Madge Sinclair as Bell Reynolds on Roots, (Episode: "Part IV"), (ABC)/Leslie Uggams as Kizzy Reynolds on Roots, (Episode: "Part VI"), (ABC)
  23. Outstanding Single Performance by a Supporting Actor in a Comedy or Drama Series: Edward Asner as Capt. Davies on Roots, (Episode: "Part I"), (ABC)/Moses Gunn as Kintango on Roots, (Episode: "Part I"), (ABC)/Robert Reed as Dr. William Reynolds on Roots, (Episode: "Part V"), (ABC)/Ralph Waite as Third mate Slater on Roots, (Episode: "Part I"), (ABC)
  24. Outstanding Single Performance by a Supporting Actress in a Comedy or Drama Series: Olivia Cole as Mathilda on Roots, (Episode: "Part VIII"), (ABC)/Sandy Duncan as Missy Anne Reynolds on Roots, (Episode: "Part V"), (ABC)/Cicely Tyson as Binta on Roots, (Episode: "Part I"), (ABC)
  25. Outstanding Directing in a Comedy Series: Alan Alda for M*A*S*H, (Episode: "Dear Sigmund"), (CBS)/Joan Darling for M*A*S*H, (Episode: "The Nurses"), (CBS)/Alan Rafkin for M*A*S*H, (Episode: "Lt. Radar O'Reilly"), (CBS)
  26. Outstanding Directing in a Drama Series: David Greene for Roots, (Episode: "Part I"), (ABC)/Marvin J. Chomsky for Roots, (Episode: "Part III"), (ABC)/John Erman for Roots, (Episode: "Part II"), (ABC)/Gilbert Moses for Roots, (Episode: "Part VI"), (ABC)
  27. Outstanding Directing in a Comedy-Variety or Music Special: Steve Binder for The Barry Manilow Special, (ABC)
  28. Outstanding Directing in a Special Program - Drama or Comedy: Daniel Petrie for Eleanor and Franklin: The White House Years, (ABC)
  29. Outstanding Directing in a Comedy-Variety or Music Series: Dave Wilson for NBC's Saturday Night, (NBC)
  30. Outstanding Writing in a Comedy Series: Alan Alda for M*A*S*H, (Episode: "Dear Sigmund"), (CBS)
  31. Outstanding Writing in a Drama Series: Ernest Kinoy, William Blinn for Roots, (Episode: "Part II"), (ABC)/M. Charles Cohen, for Roots, (Episode: "Part VIII"), (ABC)/James Lee for Roots, (Episode: Part V"), (ABC)
  32. Outstanding Writing in a Comedy-Variety or Music Special: Steve Binder for The Barry Manilow Special, (ABC)/An Evening with Diana Ross, (NBC)/John Denver and Friend, (ABC)
  33. Outstanding Writing in a Comedy-Variety or Music Series: The Muppet Show, (Syndicated)
  34. Outstanding Writing in a Special Program - Drama or Comedy - Original Teleplay: James Costigan, for Eleanor and Franklin: The White House Years, (ABC)
  35. Outstanding Writing in a Special Program - Drama or Comedy - Adaptation: John McGreevey for Judge Horton and the Scottsboro Boys, (NBC)
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"The 1977 Awards saw clear favorites rise out of the Nixon/Ford legacy. Americans have reflected in their pop culture just as much as in their politics, and it's plain to see. With Rocky's clean sweep, many in America seem to have a great amount of optimism for the future, with President Carter reflecting the character's honest, hardworking background, honest personality, and osheer optimism regarding the challenges he faces, it's no surprise some of the President's supporters have made the comparison, with some pro-Carter rallies even playing the now famous 'Gonna F;y Now' in his support."

"This year has also reflected the pride America has in its history, or at least its desire to learn from it and improve, and the awards show this quite clearly, with the ABC show Roots as well as the television movie Eleanor and Franklin. The former detailing the generational story of a black family, beginning with the ancestor Kunta Kinte being brought to America as a slave, while the latter is a potrayel of the lives of Preisdent Franklin D. Roosevelt and First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt within the White House. Recongised, though not awarded were the Adams Chroinicles, detailing the stories of some of the descents of the politically impactful Adams family, including presidents John and John Q. Adams, as well as Charles Francis Adams, who served as Ambassador to Great Britain during the Civil War, and ran for President on the Liberal Republican/Democratic ticket alongside his son, John Q. Adams II in 1872."

"Alongside the optimism of tomorrow, as well as the reflection upon the mistakes and glories of the past, pop culture also represented something near and dear to the heart of every American after the Watergate scandal. . . second chances. Though it was clear that Nixon, Ford, and Reagan wouldn't get second chances, nor would they deserve them, Americans gave that forgiveness to those they felt deserved it, with none other than Elvis Presley being the biggest recipeint. Though on the outside things seemed well, with a healthy lifestyle, an unfair, yet still reasonable contract with Tom Parker, and Priscilla's acting, the King's career had been in a slump for the past few years. Though his acting skills were never in doubt, the roles had dried up, and his records just weren't selling as well as before. Not even a decade after his stupendous 1968 Grammy-winning comeback, Elvis found himself on the verge of being overshadowed once again both in music, and now on the screen as Priscilla's role in Charlie's Angels had elevated her to fame alongside her costar Farrah Fawcett. This all changed when Presley found himself on stage at the Golden Globes this January and accepted his award for Best Performance in a Comedy or Musical, for his role in A Star is Born, which went on to win several more awards both at the Golden Globes and the Academy Awards held later that year. With such a critcally acclaimed movie under his belt, and the combined media tour both he and Priscilla got on due to their on-screen sucess, and Elvis' career shot off like never before, even eclipsing his 1968 comeback. Having fired Tom Parker and Joe Esposito in September and replacing them with his cousing Billy Smith, he went back to doing what he loved best, touring. In shape, and with a reinvigorated profile, Elvis has already booked concert dates three and even four years in advance, planing to go on an intense world tour to, in his words 'Go back to the basics, and do what I love best, which is singing for the fans'. Though there have been reports of arguments between Elvis and Priscilla regarding her career and the potential impact on Lisa Marie, it seems Priscilla's insitence on the matter has put any and all discussion on the matter to rest."

"Finally, a few careers were made, or at the very least improved this year. In the first category, Jodie Foster burst onto the scene, impressing audiences, and leaving them shocked with how such a young, talented actress can pull the audience into such a rough, violente movie, playing such a controversial role, and it's clear to see why director George Lucas has gone above and beyond to ensure her participation in his upcoming project. Harrison Ford, who had nearly given up acting just a few yeaperformanchad his perseverance duly rewarded, with his role All In the Family alongside Mickey Rooney has made him a household name, his onscreen chemistry with Rooney has done wonders for the show. Ford's commitment to the show made it impossible for him to commit to directo George Lucas' new project, though he did express his best wishes, having had 'a hell of a time' filming American Graffiti with him, which went on to do a full five Oscar sweep back in 1974. Ford added 'Even without me, George knows what he's doing. Whatever he's got planned, I'm sure it'll be a hit.' FInally, Henry Fonda has kept going strong, even into his seventie's, starring in the hit movies All the President's Men and Network, the latter of which also included his daughter (and wife of California senator Tom Hayden) Jane Fonda among its cast. In his acceptance speech, he spoke of not having been sure he was right for either role, he was glad to have taken it, especially for a movie so important as All the President's Men, which dealt with 'The story of two brave journalists doing their best to expose the criminal actions of former President Nixon, and who helped bring him to justice.' Continuing his speech, he finished with 'As many of you know, I love acting with all of my heart, and even with the coming of age and the problems it brings, I have never once considered retirement, and tonight's ceremony has redoubled that commitment. I've seen just how pwerful acting can truly be by bringing such important truths to the people, and I don't ever want to stop doing that.' With this, he thanked the audience at the venue, the viewers at home, and gave the biggest thanks to his daughter Jane and his son-in-law Tom, who he saw not just as his biggest supporters, but as some of the biggest against Nixon and the VIetnam War in Hollywood, even before it was popular.
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1) Yeah, ITTL, Elvis is off the drugs, and he's had a pretty decent acting career (basically, every he's accepted every role that he was ever offered/considered for [which I'd love the list for!], which includes A Star is Born, which was also offered to Neil Diamond and Marlon Brando). Priscilla also accepts a role in Charlie's Angels, replacing Kate Jackson, since Farah Fawcett seems too crucial to replace (especially since she just won an Emmy for her performance on the show, and as such stays on the show for the full five seasons), while Jaclyn Smith stayed for the full run IOTL, though if anyone has any preference for Jackson over Smith, let me know).

2) Harrison Ford and Mickey Rooney are on All in the Family ITTLm which they both rejected IOTL due to Archie Bunker's bigotry. It's all the same to me regading Rooney, but I did want to give Ford some non-Star Wars fame, especially since I wanted to cast someone else as Han Solo (feel free to guess! Though it's not Kurt Russell, as cool as that may be. Was Marlon Brando offered the part?] since he hates it so much.

3) ITTL, Rocky does a full sweep at the Academy Awards, which is pretty deserved IMO since it's a great movie, and I think that ITTL it makes sense, since it's about an honest underdgo who goes the extra mile and then some to accomplish his dreams. Other than the speech patterns, physical prowess, and geographic location, it's a perfect encapsulation of how (some, particularly highly partisan Democrats/super anti-Nixo) voters view Carter, at least in the election, especially since Reagan comes off as an arrogant, right-winger in '76.

4) Although highly unlikely to win to this extent (up to the point of winning all four spots in a single category, Roots sweeps the Emmys because of the general societal interest on slavery and adressing America's wrongs which comes naturally to an America that has been doing so since 1974, except that since Roots is set in the past, it's not viewed (as) partisanly, and as such, can be admired.

5) M*A*S*H* wins because. . . well, duh. It's an anti-war comedy set during the Vietnam War. (At leas the movie was anti-war).

6) The Scotsboro Boys wins the award because a) I don't know the rest of the things except "Truman Speaks" and b) [not to spoil too much, but. . .] ITTL, Truman isn't President, so he doesn't get a mini-series dedicated to him since he's just "some senator from Missouri". (As anyone who's ever read my Civil War TL, I like putting in PoDs prior to the main story with some titanium nets because I feel like it gives the story color, but I do try to avoid outright ASB, or at least not make it the main thing).

7) I was legitimately surprised that Bohemian Rhapsody only got a single Grammy nomination. ITTL, they at least win it.

8) I like Sammy Davis Jr. and the whole Rat Pack.
 
With Jimmy Carter, here's what I learn from his problems as president: "Carter ran as a centrist Democrat, on a small government platform not dissimilar from Ronald Reagan four years later, and alienated many liberals within his own party. He was considered a micromanager who had a limited White House staff and difficult relations with both Congress and his own Cabinet."

That would be something he would need to face. While 1976-1980 would doom most presidents because of the economic turmoil and how much was out of it, Carter did have some problems within the party and how he did things.
 
With Jimmy Carter, here's what I learn from his problems as president: "Carter ran as a centrist Democrat, on a small government platform not dissimilar from Ronald Reagan four years later, and alienated many liberals within his own party. He was considered a micromanager who had a limited White House staff and difficult relations with both Congress and his own Cabinet."

That would be something he would need to face. While 1976-1980 would doom most presidents because of the economic turmoil and how much was out of it, Carter did have some problems within the party and how he did things.
Exactly. This is why I made three career changes to Carter for this TL: 1) He remains in the navy until mandatory retirement age, adds to his electability, and avoids (some) of the issues regarding him being seen as "weak". 2) He's governor for two terms (1967-1975) after James H. Gray pulls just enough support from Lester Maddox to prevent him from making the runoff, which then becomes Arnall v Carter. He's reelected in 1970 due to a special referendum on making an exception to the one-term rule (or something, it's not that important to the story) and he wins a second term while avoiding the racist campaign tactics he used IOTL. This allows him to a) have extra executive experience and b) learn how to establish friendly relationships with the legislature and the importance thereof. 3) Him being selected as McGovern's running mate in 1972, apart from ingratiating him with the anti-McGovern crowd (of which Carter was a part of), his time dealing with a national campaign teaches him a) a lot of lessons in regards to campaigning and b) introduced him to multiple congresspeople who he starts building relationships with, and realizes he'll need to work with them to actually get anything done.
 
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