沒有國民黨就沒有中國, Without the Kuomintang there would be no China, A Republic of China Story

Election Night 1996 五
11:00 PM Chungyuan Standard Time, Nanking, Jiangsu, China

Chen Xiaoling: Lien Chan continued to maintain his narrow lead over Li Ao. Let’s talk to our reporter in Shanghai.

Feng Ju: It really seems like the election might come down to who wins the largest city in the nation. With 60% of votes counted, Li has a small lead. I’m here at the KMT’s city headquarters. The people here are confident that the party will win Shanghai, Jiangsu, and China.

Wang Yongrui: I think we can start making some calls. With over 90% of the vote in, we can safely say that Lien Chan won his home province of Liaoning. Losing a province in the Northeast is a bad sign for Li’s campaign. However, Li has won Shanxi, and his lead in the Central Plains provinces is increasing.

12:00 AM Chungyuan Standard Time, Nanking, Jiangsu, China

Chen Xiaoling: It looks like Li has regained the lead in the overall vote. It’s very close, but it’s a welcome development in the Li Ao camp. There are still some places in the South and in Xinjiang that are taking a long time to count the votes, and those places could give

Wang Yongrui: Five provinces remain uncertain: Taiwan, Jiangsu, Shandong, Guangxi, and Shaanxi. We can, however, call Xinjiang for Lien Chan. Let’s hear from our reporter in Urumqi.

Saidullah Shahidi: We’ve conducted a number of exit polls in the major cities in Xinjiang in Mandarin, Uighur, and Kazakh. Those who responded to questions in Uighur seem to favor the KMT by wider margins than those responding to questioning in Mandarin or Kazakh. The KMT also seems poised to win the gubernatorial and other provincial and local elections here.

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Election Night 1996 六
1:00 AM Chungyuan Standard Time, Nanking, Jiangsu, China

Wang Yongrui: Over the last hour both Lien and Li have been in the lead at different times. We’re certainly not ready to project a winner yet. However, we can say that the Legislative Yuan elections seem to be going in the KMT’s favor, and the party might have a legislative majority again.

Chen Xiaoling: It looks like Li Ao’s lead in Guangxi is disappearing, as blue precincts in the province are reporting. Shandong also seems to be leaning blue, though I’m not confident enough to call either province yet. Taiwan continues to be extremely close, even with 98% of ballots counted we still can’t determine the winner.

2:00 AM Chungyuan Standard Time, Nanking, Jiangsu, China

Chen Xiaoling: Lien’s lead is increasing. I don’t want to call the election yet, but if things continue like this then his victory is guaranteed. We're putting Shandong in Lien's coumn.

Wang Yongrui: I agree. In the legislative elections, it looks like the KMT is going to win a plurality of seats, though maybe not the majority. We’ll keep you updated on some of the close races.

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Election Night 1996 七
3:58 AM Chungyuan Standard Time, Nanking, Jiangsu, China

Wang Yongrui: I think it’s time to call the election. The city of Shanghai and Jiangsu province have counted almost all the votes, and Lien is winning. The remaining votes are going to have to come in overwhelmingly for Li Ao for him to win, and I just don’t see that happening. Ladies and gentlemen, you heard it here, Lien Chan is the next president of the Republic of China.

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4:30 AM Chungyuan Standard Time, Nanking, Jiangsu, China

Chen Xiaoling: Lien Chan has given a victory speech to his supporters in Shenyang. Afterwards the crowd erupted in cheers, and many began to sing Without the Kuomintang there would be no China. Li Ao has not yet conceded.

5:15 AM Chungyuan Standard Time, Nanking, Jiangsu, China

Chen Xiaoling: Li Ao has conceded the election. In his concession speech he seems to hint at a possible run in 2002. Lien Chan is indisputably the winner of this election. After six years in the wilderness, the KMT has returned to power.
 
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These are the final results of the election:

Lien Chan/James Soong: 232,048,981 votes (50.8%)
Li Ao/Lin Yang-kang: 224,740,352 votes (49.2%)

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Lien Chan's best province was Qinghai (67%)
Li Ao's best province was Chahar (64%)

Taiwan was decided by 2,000 votes, Guangxi and Shaanxi were also very close.
 
Well,with all the scandals during the presidency of Li Ao there was no way he wasn't going to become a one-term president and hopefully Lien Chan will be better.
 
Given how political parties are now legal and that China is fully democratic, what are the chances we see some Far-Right Ultranationalist Parties emerge? I could see this movement try to emulate Zou Rong's Han Racialist Ideology or Dai Li's Fascist Blueshirt Movement.

No doubt they would be a very minor movement/party with very little votes, but it would be interesting to explore the state of fringe extremist politics in a Democratic China.
Conversely, a far left party may also emerge (99.999999%unlikely considering the fact that the last communist in china was a lone gunman, but there are far left ideologies other than communism).
 
Given how political parties are now legal and China is fully democratic, what are the chances we see some Far-Right Ultranationalist Parties emerge? This movement could try to emulate Zou Rong's Han Racialist Ideology and Dai Li's Fascist Blueshirt Movement.

No doubt they would be a minor movement/party with very few votes, but exploring the state of fringe extremist politics in a Democratic China would be interesting.
The Chinese Homeland Party is a far-right ultranationalist party that was founded when the ban on new political parties was lifted. It got a few local politicians elected, but has been largely irrelevant to Chinese politics. Other similar parties will be formed in the future. I had actually found a person who would be perfect tot lead such a party, a guy from Shanghai who moved to Taiwan OTL. but I cannot remember his name.
Conversely, a far left party may also emerge (99.999999%unlikely considering the fact that the last communist in china was a lone gunman, but there are far left ideologies other than communism).
The New Democratic League is the party of the far-left. They weren't explicitly founded that way, but the moderates in the party drifted towards the Liberal Party and the moderate leftists drifted towards the China Democratic Socialist Party.
I would like to see how Chinese new religious movements (such as Xuanyuanism and Tiandiism) would develop, consider China would have much more religious freedom compared to OTL.
I will get to that, though it may be a long time from now. I'm going to take a long break from writing alternate history starting this month. I'm going to get a few more chapters out, and then I'll make an official end of the story. Though I will come back and add supplemental updates later, as I did with my other two TLs.
 
一百一十五, Lien Chan
Lien Chan was elected President of the Republic of China. China would have its second peaceful transfer of power, this time back to the Kuomintang. Lien Chan came into office with approval ratings a little over 50%. He spoke of the need for unity, and spoke of China’s past, present, and future greatness. The ruling KMT would also come back into power in the Legislative Yuan. 399 out of 773 were members of either the KMT or its affiliate the Tibet Improvement Party. It was a majority, though a small majority. There would need to be a new President of the Legislative Yuan, and Hu Jintao of Jiangsu seemed like a good pick to many, but his association with authoritarian politicians like Jiang Zemin made others suspicious. Finally, it was determined that 78-year-old Zhang Xizhe of Guangdong, who had been elected during the Civil War at the age of 29, would be the next President of the Legislative Yuan.

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(Lien Chan)

Though some alarmists predicted a return to authoritarianism, the return of the KMT to power did not result in much of a change in how the government functioned. The government was a bit more functional because the Legislative Yuan was controlled by one party instead of an unruly coalition. Chiang Kai-shek would once again be honored by the government. New statues of Chiang Kai-shek and Chiang Ching-kuo were unveiled. He appointed Chiang Hsiao-wu, grandson of Chiang Kai-shek and Lien’s main opponent during the presidential nomination, as Premier. This appointment drew criticism, with many claiming that he was only chosen for his family name or as part of a possible deal that took place during the nomination process. Lien said that Chiang was chosen for his qualifications.

The early part of Lien Chan’s presidency was more concerned with foreign than domestic policy. The collapse of Communism presented new opportunities for foreign policy. Mongolia was in a tough situation. Its main benefactor had reduced aid years earlier and now was falling apart. In his last months in office, Li Ao had ordered military exercises near the Mongolian border and Chinese planes flew over Mongolian airspace. Mongolian leadership had already announced its departure from the Stalinist policies of Khorloogin Choibalsan and Yumjaagiin Tsedenbal in late 1995. The Chinese Communist exile bases were closed down. In 1996, Mongolian President Punsalmaagiin Ochirbat visited China, and met with Lien Chan. The two leaders came to an agreement that would preserve Mongolian independence. Aid would be given to help prop up the failing Mongolian economy. Chinese businessmen would soon descend upon the country.

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(Punsalmaagiin Ochirbat)

China’s greatest rival was falling apart. Shortly after Lien entered office, Kyrgyzstan and Tajikistan voted to secede from the Soviet Union, giving China two new neighbors. Kazakhstan left the USSR later in the year. China quickly moved to establish diplomatic relations with their new neighbors. The Lien administration was criticized for not immediately pushing China’s territorial claims on Tajikistan. The Tajikistan issue would be left for a later date. Relations with the remaining USSR were normalized once more. The country was no longer seen as any threat to China. They mighty had fallen. Some of the Russian refugees in China would return to their home country. The Soviet Union’s former ally was going through hard times too.

North Korea, just like Mongolia, had seen Soviet aid reduced in the early years of the 1990s as the Soviet economy collapsed. Kim Il-sung died in 1991, and was succeeded by his son Kim Jong-il. North Korea was suffering from food shortages and a failing economy. A group of officers attempted a coup in May 1996 and failed. Some anti-Kim elements in the military started a rebellion against the government, hoping to get help from South Korea and China. In July the Republic of Korea and the Republic of China launched airstrikes against the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea. After a few days of airstrikes, the North Korean air force bombed several targets in South Korea. All-out war followed.

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(ROC planes)

North Korean soldiers launched an offensive to cut off the South Korean part of Hwanghae Province from the rest of the country. Border skirmishes broke out across the former DMZ. For the first few days, little happened on the China-Korea border. The Chinese army of the 1990s was smaller than it was in the 80s, and in 1996 the majority of Chinese soldiers were stationed in the west. However, the Chinese Navy and Air Force devastated their North Korean counterparts. In August, Chinese troops cut North Korea off from the roads connecting to the Soviet Union. In late August, a full-fledged Chinese offensive began. Chinese troops crossed the Yalu River from Dandong into Sinuiju, though they took heavy casualties in the process. North Korea launched missiles at China. Further South, North Korea had captured some Southern towns, but they were being pushed back. As ROK forces retook these towns, locals told of atrocities carried out by DPRK soldiers.

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(North Korean Soldiers)

By September Chinese forces were pouring into North Korea in large numbers. Heavy fighting occurred between North and South Korean armies in the west. Large numbers of North Korean soldiers were deserting and many who were captured wanted to defect. At the end of the month, ROK forces captured Sariwon, and recaptured their side of Hwanghae Province with the help of Chinese marines. On October 1, Chinese forces captured Pyongsong. From the 12th to the 25th, the battle of Pyongyang was fought. Though the Chinese did the bulk of the fighting, South Korean troops arrived towards the end of the battle. The majority of the remaining DPRK forces surrendered after that. Kim Jong-il was missing, though he was found by North Korean rebels near Chongpyong on the 27th and summarily executed.

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(Kim Jong-il)

Peace was not achieved yet. There would be an ongoing guerilla war as diehard believers in Juche would not lay down their arms. They would eventually be defeated. North Korea would be governed by a council of dissident officers. This new government would immediately lift restrictions on freedom of speech, freedom of religion, and property rights. Trade agreements were signed with both South Korea and China. Most within the new government expressed their desire for Korean unification, though that remained a divisive subject in the South. North Koreans would flood over the border in search of better job opportunities. South Korean (and to a lesser extent, Chinese) doctors, businessmen, missionaries, and others went North in large numbers as well. It was a new era for Korea.

In November, Lien Chan gave a speech in which he declared that Communism in Asia is finished. Mongolia was transitioning to democracy and the Iranian Communist regime was bound to fall soon. His popularity rose. Though some criticized the war in Korea as unnecessary, they were firmly in the minority when it came to public opinion. The United States congratulated China and South Korea for liberating the North Korean people. Lien Chan had meet with US President Jack Kemp earlier in the year. The two men were on friendly terms. But there was a growing distrust of China not only in the United States but all throughout the West. With the Soviet Union an afterthought, one that would cease to exist within a year, America’s next geopolitical rival was obvious. That could come later. For now, Kemp and Lien could enjoy the well-fought victory in the Cold War.
 
Good news for Korea! This seems to have created a Moldova-Romania situation, hopefully the two can reunite eventually! Good news in that regard I suppose, without OTL's Korean War, I imagine North Korea's level of economic and societal development to be more like East Germany or other Warsaw Pact nations rather than whatever the fuck it is OTL so an eventual reunification could indeed be possible given how OTL, South Korea wasn't that far advanced in the 1990s either.

Also the West is already starting to distrust China? Interesting, they only really started distrusting China in around the 2010s OTL but I suppose China developing faster ITTL and no US need to prop it up against the Soviets have made that happen faster.

Without a Korean War, South Korea and now the recently deCommunized North Korea are deffo fully in the Chinese sphere. I also have a feeling China is going to start pushing its territorial claims on Tajikistan and India and whoever else as well as the South China Sea. And China already having Taiwan ITTL means that they have the semiconductor chip industry (if that happened ITTL) and more importantly, the ability to have a blue water fleet that can move undetected by the US. In other words, the US's first island chain is automatically broken from the start ITTL and I doubt they'd be able to so easily blockade the ROC the way they can the PRC OTL.

A now democratic China is also a much harder sell to US citizens for fighting after working together since WWII, and I imagine that much like OTL, many many US companies and citizens won't give a shit and will just want to make money in China and without being an authoritarian nightmare commiting human rights atrocities, the US govt will likely find it harder to turn its citizenry against China.
 
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Now that China claimed its rightful place as the most powerful country in Asia, it is time to prepare for final confrontation against USA and other western devils, who will never accept great and independent China. China cannot remain secure as long there are american bases in Japan and western Pacific surrounding China. Demilitarization of the Pacific and Australia should be considered in the near future when China is strong enough to do it.
 
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Good news for Korea! This seems to have created a Moldova-Romania situation, hopefully the two can reunite eventually! Good news in that regard I suppose, without OTL's Korean War, I imagine North Korea's level of economic and societal development to be more like East Germany or other Warsaw Pact nations rather than whatever the fuck it is OTL so an eventual reunification could indeed be possible given how OTL, South Korea wasn't that far advanced in the 1990s either.
North Korea is a bit worse off than East Germany, though not as bad as OTL 2022.
Also the West is already starting to distrust China? Interesting, they only really started distrusting China in around the 2010s OTL but I suppose China developing faster ITTL and no US need to prop it up against the Soviets have made that happen faster.

Without a Korean War, South Korea and now the recently deCommunized North Korea are deffo fully in the Chinese sphere. I also have a feeling China is going to start pushing its territorial claims on Tajikistan and India and whoever else as well as the South China Sea. And China already having Taiwan ITTL means that they have the semiconductor chip industry (if that happened ITTL) and more importantly, the ability to have a blue water fleet that can move undetected by the US. In other words, the US's first island chain is automatically broken from the start ITTL and I doubt they'd be able to so easily blockade the ROC the way they can the PRC OTL.
Taiwan (and China) doesn't have much of a semiconductor industry. I haven't entirely figured out what I'm doing yet with the future of international relations (I only planned out the TL to 1997).
A now democratic China is also a much harder sell to US citizens for fighting after working together since WWII, and I imagine that much like OTL, many many US companies and citizens won't give a shit and will just want to make money in China and without being an authoritarian nightmare commiting human rights atrocities, the US govt will likely find it harder to turn its citizenry against China.
Things will be a bit different. Right now, the debate in the US about China is kind of similar to the debate over NAFTA in the 1990s. The establishment wing of both parties supports it, but working class voters in both parties see it as a way to outsource American jobs. So public opinion is divided for now.
 
Wasn't expecting such a huge development, but it warms the heart to see North Korea liberated.

Looking forward to the new global status quo now that the Cold War is definitely over.
 
The North Korea problem is now solved and when the two Koreas reunify it is going to be a reunification under the South Korean flag and government
 
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