Search results

  1. The Biden Express

    I typically think of Virginia as a southern state rather then Mid-Atlantic...but you talking about Chuck Robb aren't you?
  2. AH Challenge: African-American President before 1914

    I think the situation for this may have existed in Colonial Virginia in 1676, that year was the year was the year of Bacon's Rebellion. My understanding of Bacon's Rebellion is that it was pretty much an alliance of blacks and poor whites. So maybe that could somehow be the jumping off point for...
  3. Go South, Young Man...

    Ah, thanks. I guess that's what you get for posting things at one in morning:) I wonder though if someone in Seward's cabinet won't have exerted the same influence on him that Lincoln did?
  4. Go South, Young Man...

    Um, I seem to recall somewhere that it in OTL during the Trent Affair Lincoln and Seward were in agreement that the North could only handle "One war at a time", or possibly that it was Seward pushing Lincoln to avoid war with Britian. Therefore it seems like that Seward and his Secretary of...
  5. Possibly Different Gettysburg

    Hooker definitely had the best opportunity to beat Lee in 1863, his plan for the Chancellorsville campaign was very well worked out. However, if IIRC, by the time Hooker was hit on the head, the Battle of Chancellorsville was already lost, as it occurred the night of Jackson's attack. A better...
  6. Joe Johnston at Shiloh, Beauregard in the Peninsular

    I maybe totally wrong about this, but I remember reading somewhere that part of the bad blood between Joe Johnson and Jefferson Davis was because Johnson was the senior officer to leave the Union army, but he was ranked in the Confederate service behind Samuel Cooper, AS Johnson, and RE Lee. I...
  7. Joe Johnston at Shiloh, Beauregard in the Peninsular

    If he had gone West in 1862, Joe Johnson would be AS Johnson's second in command, much as Beauregard was. Could Joe Johnson really exert that much influence over his commander? If he couldn't would Joe Johnson have stayed and fought the second day at Shiloh, or would he have tried to withdraw...
  8. Confederate capital if Virginia did not secede

    Wouldn't the Confederate capital stay in Montgomery, after all it was already there anyway.
  9. Sunrise Lands Speculation

    It was released last week, or on Monday, not sure which. Point is, it is in bookstores now.
  10. Breckinridge Made Confederate Secretary of War: March, 1862

    And then Davis would have sacked him. Davis kept appointing non-entities to run the War Department so that he could be personally involved. IIRC he tended to try and run the government like the army, everyone taking his orders. He only allowed other people to run the war when he didn't have any...
  11. President James E. Carter, 1977-1985.

    IMHO you might also add that at least he was an fairly decent, honest man. He didn't have any major scandals, he didn't involve the US in disastrous wars, through his foreign policy left something to be desired. But overall, he probably have been considered a better president if he had ruled in...
  12. Dole Wins

    Maybe we don't need to have those voters vote for Dole, so much as against Bill Clinton. Ross Perot got something like 8 million votes in 1992. Perhaps if he had run a stronger campaign in '96 he could have pulled more votes away from Clinton. Another possibility could be that Clinton's affairs...
  13. The Revolution Takes A Different Path

    Excuse me guys, but doesn't this sentence seem to imply that this Duke of Portland is PM and the Charles Fox is in fact in some lesser position and merely a behind the scenes player?
  14. Lee's army surrenders 1862

    I don't believe that would be a problem. Let's look at Thomas' one independent command at Nashville. True, Thomas' stalling near cost him his command (by nearly I mean his replacement was already on his way). But Thomas was waiting with a reason. First, he knew that further reinforcements for...
  15. Lee's army surrenders 1862

    While Thomas didn't have the patience of Job, he must have had something close to it. He spent the first three years under the command of the three of the slowest of the slow. Those were Henry Halleck, who took something like three months to march his army twenty miles from Shiloh to Corinth...
  16. Lee's army surrenders 1862

    That's true, but remember, at F-Burg, Burnside's attacks were poorly coordinated, with his attack on Jackson's line going in hours before the one of Longstreet's lines. In addition, Burnside held most of Hooker's Grand Division in reserve. As you well know, this is very much the same...
  17. Lee's army surrenders 1862

    That might be fairly easy to accomplish. I just took at look at Thomas' page on Wikipedia, and according to them, he was in command of a brigade under Patterson during the Manassas campaign. Maybe if Patterson had actually done something useful, instead of just sitting in the Valley, Thomas...
  18. Lee's army surrenders 1862

    I think I can answer this. Between April (The battle of Shiloh) and June (The fall of Corinth Miss.) Thomas was the commander of the Army of Tenn., while Grant is second in command of all western forces at the request of General Henry Halleck. After this point and throughout most of the Bragg's...
  19. Lee's army surrenders 1862

    So the question is can anyone of them do better than McClellan did in OTL. I'll throw in my two cents; again, see if you agree with me. Burnside and Hooker both got tried as Army Commanders in OTL. Burnside, of course, had the complete disaster that was Fredericksburg, which was pretty much...
  20. Different US Neutrality 1914

    I would like to throw in my two cents on this point, if you don't mind. I agree that Bryan going head to head against TR would be pretty bloody. But 1912 might be a different story. If, and its a big if, Bryan manages to capture the Democratic nomination, he is not facing TR and Taft at the...
Top