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  1. Why did the British need Australia as a penal colony when they already have vast tracks of land in Canada?

    The British transported convicts to America right up to the Revolutionary War. One fourth of the migrants during the eighteenth century from Britain to the British colonies were transported convicts. During the war the British had to house the buildup of convicted criminals on decommissioned...
  2. Peshwar Lancers Redux: India

    In the appendix on languages, Stirling mentions "Mormon enclaves in the Rockies".
  3. WI: No Japanese-American Internment

    In my last post was a report to the Secretary of the Interior from the head of the agency directly responsible for resettling Japanese-Americans, in which he stated that acceptance of Japanese-Americans was at an all-time high. Yes there still were virulently anti-Japanese voices at the end of...
  4. WI: No Japanese-American Internment

    You have asked for sources whenever I have corrected your unsupported assertions. Please provide contemporaneous evidence of your assertions of a trend of increasing anti-Japanese American sentiment in the United States during the course of the war. This does not match my family's experience nor...
  5. WI: No Japanese-American Internment

    Most of those released settled in cities, the city of Chicago alone received more than 6000. Here is a more fine-grained description of the situation of the 300 in Des Moines in 1944...
  6. WI: No Japanese-American Internment

    Actually, more than 6000 Japanese-Americans also served in the military in the Pacific Theater. They served mainly in the Military Intelligence Service, as translators and interrogators. Their service was unpublicised, to keep the Japanese military lax in their security in thinking that the...
  7. WI: No Japanese-American Internment

    Japanese-Americans were barred from an area of the Pacific coast that included California, most of Oregon and Washington, and part of Arizona. These restrictions were not lifted until December 1944. Most of those released did not work in agriculture; most found work in the urban areas where the...
  8. WI: No Japanese-American Internment

    They were released to where they had job offers; this would not correlate very well to places with low populations. The locations were not necessarily inland, they could be on the Atlantic or Gulf coasts. The WRA offices were scattered around the country, as seen in the quote below. Here is a...
  9. WI: No Japanese-American Internment

    People were moved around mainly to separate and congregate the "no-no's" who refused to sign the loyalty oath, seeing it as an insult to their citizenship or fearing it would be used against them. My aunt and uncle were farmers before the war; I know my grandparents on that side had an orchard...
  10. WI: No Japanese-American Internment

    Here is a quote from a document produced by the War Relocation Authority in May 1943: http://www.sfmuseum.org/hist10/relocbook.html
  11. WI: No Japanese-American Internment

    Here is the relevant page from one of the War Relocation Authority's semi-annual reports: http://www.oldmagazinearticles.com/Japanese-American_Internment_Camp_Population_Study Release from the camps wasn't that uncommon. I had an aunt and uncle that were released to work in the apple harvest in...
  12. WI: No Japanese-American Internment

    BS. As I stated above, tens of thousands of Japanese Americans were released during the war. From a high of over 110,000 in May 1942, by January 1944 there were 92,000 remaining in camps, reduced further to 82,000 by June of that year. So there were tens of thousands of Japanese Americans...
  13. WI: No Japanese-American Internment

    The internment was not total for the duration of the war. Release was possible to states away from the Pacific coast, when there were sponsors and the promise of work or school. Thousands left the camps every year through such releases, tens of thousands by the end of the war. So there was...
  14. WI: No Japanese-American Internment

    No. The historical situation provides a controlled experiment. In Hawaii, the Japanese-American population remained free, and committed zero acts of sabotage. In the continental US, the Japanese-American population were put into relocation camps, from which it was common to receive release to...
  15. WI: No Japanese-American Internment

    No, there was never any evidence that the Japanese Americans would sabotage or work in any way against the US. It would make exactly as much sense to put you into an internment camp because you couldn't prove that you wouldn't engage in sabotage. Logically, it is impossible to prove a negative.
  16. WI: No Japanese-American Internment

    The Japanese-American veterans regarded their service during the war as the ultimate demonstration of their loyalty to the US. They wanted to be accepted as loyal Americans, and would not turn that on its head to declare independence from the US.
  17. WI: No Japanese-American Internment

    No. The Japanese Americans were not sent to the relocation camps until May 1942. In the time between Pearl Harbor and then, there were no race riots directed against them. If there were none in the period of highest anger and paranoia, why would there be any later on?
  18. A Glorious Union or America: the New Sparta

    The rebels had fled or been imprisoned, hung, or expatriated. Hanging the debts onto the States would only put handicaps on the Unionist and freedmen that the government want to succeed.
  19. A Glorious Union or America: the New Sparta

    Robert Todd Lincoln and Lucy Lambert Hale. His courting of her and winning out over John Wilkes Booth are described in Chapter 127.
  20. A Glorious Union or America: the New Sparta

    How did the government finance maintaining a large army? During the OTL Civil War, two-thirds of the financing was through sale of war bonds, which would need to be repaid. That source would dry up with the onset of peace; no one would want the government to continue to kick debts into the...
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