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  1. San Stefano borders enforced in 1878 - consequences for Turkey's future? For western Balkans?

    Most Bulgarian revolutionaries didn't care about religion. (well some did in an abstract political way). I can think of one , and I don't like him. I kind of hate him. Why would that be a problem, in your opinion?
  2. San Stefano borders enforced in 1878 - consequences for Turkey's future? For western Balkans?

    That's why it was a sham of a treaty: Russia never intended to uphold it. And it was not in Bulgaria's interest anyway -- Russia gave Nish to Serbia, Northern Dobruja to Romania just to create conflict on the Balkans (also to get closer access to the straits because they though of Romania...
  3. San Stefano borders enforced in 1878 - consequences for Turkey's future? For western Balkans?

    Salonica was plurality Jewish at the time, not Greek. Maybe majority, around 50% in any case. I remember a census around 1900 and it was Jews around 50%, then Greeks, Turks and Bulgarians.
  4. Primavera d'Italia: War, Love and Revolution

    I'm enjoying it, I was just curious if you had read the novel. It's a novel within a novel.
  5. Primavera d'Italia: War, Love and Revolution

    Is this timeline somehow inspired by the novel Ariosto? I don't suppose many people have read it, but there are similarities. https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/219285.Ariosto
  6. The novel Swastika Night was a pre-WWII (1937) "Nazist victory" dystopia. Any others?

    Yeah, I was wondering about where it belongs, because when it was published in 1937 it was future history. I couln't find a suitable crtiterion to distinguish between things that were future history when they were published, but the events they were describing don't align with the subsequent...
  7. The novel Swastika Night was a pre-WWII (1937) "Nazist victory" dystopia. Any others?

    I guess this belongs in the Future History subsection (correct me if I'm wrong), seeing as it was published in 1937 and was describing the aftermath of a Nazist victory in *WWII. I had almost forgotten about it, but someone just reviewed it on their blog and I remembered about it and couldn't...
  8. Lands of Ice and Mice: An Alternate History of the Thule

    The fact that you are even in that crowd is amazing. Congrats.
  9. Animals you wished didn’t go extinct (due to human contact)

    Corals, I think. I always wanted to visit the Great Barrier Reef. EDIT: I know they still exist, mates. I just don't see myself getting the money to visit them while they still do.
  10. Lands of Red and Gold, Act II

    I met some people from the Sidney area on new years's 2020 in Sofia in a bar, and at the moment I mention anything concerning traditional Australian agriculture -- I did NOT know there were wildfires there -- it's like I was supposed to know there were wildfires there. I had not been following...
  11. Potential domesticates

    Foxes have been domesticated, and bears also. I've encounetered domesticated bears myself (and wild ones also, but only passingly). As DValdron mentioned, bears are not carnivores, only circumstantially -- they are less carnivorous than humans -- they are usually, with the exception of polar...
  12. WI: no alphabet

    Historical evidence suggests that writing has been invented independently _at most_ on four different occasions: Egypt, Mesopotamia, The Yellow river basin, and the Yucatan peninsula. This, of course has nothing to do with alphabets, which are a much more recent development.
  13. Anybody else read Summerland?

    Does he actually not get a papal name or is it just not mentioned?
  14. Anybody else read Summerland?

    I haven't read any of Hannu's books yet, but it sounds like something Charlie Stross would find interesting, and it sounds absolutely hilarious :D. I understand now why he keeps recommending him. I've been putting off reading The Quantum Thief forever. EDIT: context...
  15. WI: no alphabet

    Latin writing did not consistently distinguish vowels either, most notably vowel length. However the complete disregard of vowel length was less widespread than commonly assumed. In monumental inscriptions diacritics marking vowel length are not that rare.
  16. Is it possible for the balkans to keep romance speaking under a Byzantine Empire able to repeal slavic invasions?

    I deliberateliy did not mention the Jireček line, because it would be anachronistic. Almost all of the Balkans south to the Peloponese with the exception of Albania and coastal (Greek-speaking) enclaves and mountainous (Latin-speaking) was majority Slavic-speaking in the seventh century. It...
  17. Is it possible for the balkans to keep romance speaking under a Byzantine Empire able to repeal slavic invasions?

    The Thracians were already assimilated into the incoming Latin-speaking colonists, and a lot of the native Thracians were also taken into the troops that were fighting further east. By the time of the Slavic invasions, not much remained of the Thracian-speakers in the Balkans. Probably by the...
  18. What if: Krum and Nikephoros both slain at Pliska

    Well by the surviving accounts the battle of Varbica pass was a perfectly executed ambush, but of course those are questionable; I thought it would be more realistic if Krum died at Pliska itself? EDIT: I doubt it, it seems to me that he saw that Nikephoros underestimated the mobility of the...
  19. What if: Krum and Nikephoros both slain at Pliska

    That's an interesting point of divergence. Krum does not die at the siege of Constantinople, but rather at the sacking of his own capital? And Nikephoros also dies there?
  20. AHQ: Christianity without Paul

    Do you mean Paul? Probably, but that's what I meant by "unrecognizable". Although I guess there was a social environment for a religion with vaguely similar tenets to arise. But I guess you should read the Epistles and analyze them in the context of the society they were written in. There might...
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