Search results

  1. Biggest "You Blew it!" moments in History (Pre-1900)

    Louis XVI supporting the American rebels, only to bankrupt himself in the process, leading to the French Revolution and his own overthrow and murder. Rome killing Stilicho and the families of his barbarian foederati, not only depriving the Western Empire of its greatest general at a time of...
  2. Roman weapons being the inspiration for Relic weapons?

    As others have said, barbarians tended to scavenge Roman armour because the Romans made so much of it, not because it was qualitatively better. So, for example, more Roman soldiers than Goths would have chain-mail coats, but a Gothic chain-mail coat would be just as good as a Roman one.
  3. '1859 Pig War' leads to an Actual War Between the British Empire and United States?

    Why? Their defences are generally pretty poor, and they're mostly located near to the sea or along navigable rivers, making them vulnerable to attack from an enemy with naval superiority. And it's not like the British would have to occupy them long-term -- just long enough to destroy all the...
  4. '1859 Pig War' leads to an Actual War Between the British Empire and United States?

    So how quickly are you expecting the US to start exploiting these natural resources? And what is the country to do in the meantime to defend itself? And, to rebut the obvious response, no, I'm not suggesting that Britain is going to occupy the whole of the US. But there are plenty of things the...
  5. '1859 Pig War' leads to an Actual War Between the British Empire and United States?

    Also, there seems to be a weird unspoken assumption going round that Britain is just going to sit back whilst the US raises army after army to overrun Canada with sheer weight of numbers. If America can raise new troops, Britain can as well. In fact, Britain can raise better troops more easily...
  6. '1859 Pig War' leads to an Actual War Between the British Empire and United States?

    With what weapons would they be fighting, exactly? The Union can't import arms from abroad as it did IOTL, due to the British blockade, and it can't even buy arms from British blockade runners like the South did. Unless they're planning on doing the old "Pick up the other guy's rifle when he...
  7. '1859 Pig War' leads to an Actual War Between the British Empire and United States?

    Fair point re: spare armaments being moved north, although I think you're understating the amount that would need to be left down South -- IOTL, as I recall, the CSA had something like 75,000 men defending its coast from Union attacks, and they'd need a whole lot of gunpowder, ammunition...
  8. '1859 Pig War' leads to an Actual War Between the British Empire and United States?

    Yeah, about the most serious long-term consequence I envisage is that the British get the San Juan Islands, and whilst I'm sure they're very nice, I can't really see America fighting a world war just to get them back. Incidentally, I was looking on the Wikipedia article on the Pig War, and...
  9. '1859 Pig War' leads to an Actual War Between the British Empire and United States?

    Even in WW1, the German high command were, if not actively looking for war, at least glad of an opportunity to take Russia down a peg or two before the latter got too strong to challenge German pre-eminence in Europe. If the US hates being forced to outlaw slavery so much, why would it accept...
  10. AHC: Have a Greek or Macedonian state hold part of China for any length of time.

    Kind of cheating, but... The Kingdom of Greece gets in on the 19th-century colonialism game, and manages to get a treaty port from the Qing.
  11. How to get a more "original" Roman high culture?

    That's a matter of semantic change ("Hellene" going from designating a nationality to a religion), not of cultural shift (Greeks adopting Roman culture).
  12. How to get a more "original" Roman high culture?

    Except that the Roman culture of Augustus didn't change into the culture of Byzantium; their culture was a descendant of ancient Greece's, not of ancient Rome's. In fact, the Byzantines tended to consider Westerners -- the people whose culture did actually directly descend from that of Augustan...
  13. How to get a more "original" Roman high culture?

    Part of the issue seems to be that Greek culture during the Archaic and Classical periods was more advanced than what the native Western Mediterranean societies had to offer, meaning that Greek culture became very prestigious and was consequently adopted far and wide. (Cf. how Roman culture...
  14. How to get a more "original" Roman high culture?

    Firstly, that's a rather simplistic way of looking at things -- just because the Greeks were given Roman citizenship, it didn't make Greek culture the same as Roman culture. Even when the Greeks started calling themselves Romans, they still spoke Greek, educated their children with authors like...
  15. AHC: No business suit

    To be fair to the business suit, formal wear in lots of cultures is kind of impractical. Indeed, that's often part of the point -- "I'm a rich, important person, so I can get other people to do the running-around for me." Also, I think a lot of the problems he raises could be quite easily solved...
  16. AHC: Latin triumphant

    The most plausible route I can see is to keep Latin as the language of scholarship until the rise of mass education, and then have countries teach their children to speak Latin, much as non-Anglophone countries nowadays teach children to speak English. In particularly multicultural areas Latin...
  17. English language if 1066 never happens

    Plus, French culture was very influential in medieval Europe, in a way that Portuguese or whatever culture wasn't, which would have led to borrowings to describe high cultural/prestige items. People wouldn't have opposed him, per se, they'd just use their normal, non-inflected language for...
  18. For how long was Rome remembered?

    It had been during the Classical period, but Greek seems to have dropped off the Western curriculum sometime during the third or fourth century. By Augustine's time, it seems that even educated people only studied Greek to (the equivalent of) primary school level, if that. Legally, yes. In...
  19. For how long was Rome remembered?

    Gildas, writing in the 540s or 550s, refers to his fellow Britons as "citizens" (cives) and to Latin as "our language". Granted he seems to have received a classical education himself, which would make him more aware of Romanitas, but on the other hand Britain had been one of the least Romanised...
  20. WI: The Great Egyptian Revolt succeeded?

    TBH I'm not sure the Successors ever really needed a casus belli to fight a war, just an opportunity.
Top