Top Secret NWO Leadership Election Test Thread Has More Posts Then Oppo's And Comisario's Threads

Discussion in 'Post Test Messages Here' started by Puget Sound, Oct 22, 2014.

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Who do you vote for in the New World Order leadership elections?

  1. Beatrix Campbell (Joint Labour/Green/Socialist Labour Alliance/RESPECT candidate)

    16.1%
  2. David Icke (Shapeshifting Lizard Aliens Party)

    21.1%
  3. Nigel Farage (Norsefire)

    26.7%
  4. Lembit Öpik (More Extramarital Affairs Party)

    13.9%
  5. Thomas Anderson (Yorkshire Socialist Party)

    22.2%
  1. Puget Sound Stewart Brand Is Right!

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    Thread OP
    This is a test poll for the NWO elections!
     
  2. Puget Sound Stewart Brand Is Right!

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    Cyberman design (not mine)
  3. Puget Sound Stewart Brand Is Right!

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    Stassen family info for Screw Primaries
    Last edited: Nov 18, 2014
  4. Puget Sound Stewart Brand Is Right!

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    CalBear signal
    For future reference:

    [​IMG]

    Not created by me, but by another AH.commer.
     
  5. Puget Sound Stewart Brand Is Right!

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  6. Puget Sound Stewart Brand Is Right!

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  7. Puget Sound Stewart Brand Is Right!

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  8. Puget Sound Stewart Brand Is Right!

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  9. Puget Sound Stewart Brand Is Right!

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  10. Puget Sound Stewart Brand Is Right!

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    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  11. Puget Sound Stewart Brand Is Right!

    Joined:
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    The Future of America

    Welcome to The Future Of America, a political game where you can decide the future course of U.S politics. This game is based upon a similar game by Alternatehistory.com forum user history nerd ( you can find one of the first threads for that game (called Screw Primaries) on that forum here: http://www.alternatehistory.com/discussion/showthread.php?t=326626 ). From that game:

    In our timeline party conventions became increasingly irreverent being slowly replaced by the more democratic process of Primaries. But what if they didn't? What if American Politics continued to be run on the old model with ballot after ballot and back room deals?

    In our timeline 1972 was the first election where Primaries had completely replaced the Convention as the method of choosing candidates. Not so in this universe!

    And me again:

    Basically, you and anyone else who wants to play will be voting on candidates for each party's presidential ticket at their respective national conventions (there are no primaries, hence the name of the game that inspired this) and I will run a simulated election and also simulate each term in office.

    So, basically we're running the national conventions for the two major parties?

    Yes.

    How does it work?

    You will vote on candidates for the presidential for both parties over a number of ballots and candidates are eliminated until one candidate has 50% plus one of the votes.

    What happens after that?

    You will do the same thing for the vice presidential nomination for both parties, and then I will simulate an election and the term of the winner. After that, we’ll do the same thing for the next presidential election, and so on until 2016ish.

    Can I write in candidates?

    Yes, you can. They must either be plausible candidates who were actually eligible politicians in real life or real life or fictional people added to the game by you or other players (see below).

    How can I add candidates?

    You will need to get points.

    How can I get some points?

    First, you need to make something from an in-universe perspective. This can be an commentary on the elections, a political ad, a Wikipedia infobox, etc. It just needs to have some effort put into it. Examples from that other game:

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    I will then look over your submission and decide whether to approve it or not. If I do, you will get a point.

    So, how do I use points to add characters?

    You need to post that you are using a point to add someone to the game. This can be a real-life person (make sure to include a link to a Wikipedia page or something so I can vet the character) or a fictional character. If you are doing a fictional character, YOU CAN NOT MAKE ONE UP ON THE SPOT. You can choose a character used in USG (make sure to include a link or brief bio) or a fictional character from some other work of fiction (make sure to include a link and short description, and make the character realistic). Make sure to also include the office you want them to run for (House, Governor, Senate, etc.) You can NOT simply add someone onto the convention ballot right away, through.

    Let me guess, they need experience?

    Yes, that’s right! Let’s say its 1976 and you want to run someone in 1992 (let’s say Hank Hill). You make a wiki infobox to get a point, and then you spend that point to add Hank to the game as a House rep. (If you ask for a Senate seat or Governor for an inexperienced real life person or a fictional character, it may not happen because of their experience, so it might be better to get them into a House seat, state legislature, the Cabinet, or a state executive position (like Attorney General or Insurance Commissioner of a state)). Once 1992 nears, you can get and spend another point on Hank to run for president (you may not need to do so if he or she gets high-profile enough- check the news in various posts. If they are high-profile enough, they will run for President on their own and you won’t need to spend a point). Or you can choose to spend a point, say, in 1984 or 1988, to get Hank into a higher office, like the Senate or a governorship or the Cabinet to make him more experienced and therefore much better at running for the presidency (candidates who are not ready, even if chosen by the convention, will probably be crushed in the general election).

    Can you repeat all that again in a shorter version?

    Sure. Basically:

    Decide who you want to add to the game.
    Get a point by making something per the rules above.
    Spend a point to add that person or character to the game in some position.
    Optional: Spend another point to get that person elected to a higher office in the future to make them more electable.
    Spend another point to make them run for president (you may not need to do this- they may run for president on their own, especially if they are high-profile enough).

    What about people who historically run for or were likely to run for President? Do we have to spend points to add them too?

    No, historical candidates will probably be on the ballot anyway, so you might not have to worry about it. It just depends on how history goes and how the parties evolve.

    Can I spend points to making events happen (or not happen) or to give a career boost to people?

    Yes, you can! You can’t spend points to make candidates die before their OTL death or make bad things happen to them, through. I also will hold final approval on anything you want to do with points, so if you want to do something, just post and ask if its possible!

    And if I have any more questions?

    Just post in the thread and ask!
     
  12. Puget Sound Stewart Brand Is Right!

    Joined:
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    1976 Background (mostly taken from the game is this based upon, with some edits to fit my scenario:

    It wasn't long after Nixon's victory that rumors began to surface that he may have pulled some dirty tricks. It wasn't long before that in 1973 had revealed that Nixon had cronies infiltrate the DNC, steal election plans from hotel rooms and employ blackmail to sabotage the Democrats. After Sprio Agnew's resignation, Nixon appointed Nelson Rockefeller of New York as Vice-President (instead of Gerald Ford as in RL). In late 1973 Nixon would be forced to resign from the presidency leaving the liberal Rockefeller in charge.

    Rockefeller s term would be rocky however as he proved incapable of working with the conservatives within his own party. His failure to pardon Nixon and selection of moderate VP Ford would prove controversial. Democrats also refused to pass Rockefeller's agenda out of anger at his association with Nixon. Due to his families famous background and unimaginable wealth rumors would fly on both sides of the isle that he somehow "bought the Presidency" or "Set Nixon up". Of note, Ronald Reagan is running a conservative insurgent campaign in the GOP against Rockefeller.

    To vote:

    Choose ONE candidate that you are voting for from each party (so, vote for ONE Democrat and ONE Republican) and post your vote. RPing as delegates is highly encouraged, and may get your points or other rewards. You can also make deals with other delegates and candidates will take those into account, but they may or may not be accepted by the candidates themselves or may be altered.

    1976 Democratic National Convention, 1st ballot

    Jimmy Carter
    Morris Udall
    Birch Bayh
    Frank Church
    Fred Harris
    Henry M. Jackson
    George Wallace
    Terry Sanford
    George McGovern
    Write-In (post name, or it won't count)

    1976 Republican National Convention, 1st ballot

    Nelson Rockefeller
    Ronald Reagan
    Howard Baker
    Edward Brooke
    Dan Evans
    Barry Goldwater
    Harold E. Stassen
    Jesse Helms
    Write-In (post name, or it won't count)

    Example vote (so you can see how to vote on each ballot):

    Democrats: Henry M. Jackson

    Republicans: Dan Evans
     
  13. Puget Sound Stewart Brand Is Right!

    Joined:
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    Final 1st ballot results:

    Democrats, 1st ballot:

    George Wallace- 4 (50%)
    Morris Udall- 2 (25%)
    Birch Bayh- 1 (12.5%)
    Jesse Jackson (write-in)-1 (12.5%)
    Total votes: 8 votes (100%)

    Republicans, 1st ballot:

    Ronald Reagan- 2 (25%)
    Strom Thurmond (Write-In)- 2 (25%)
    Nelson Rockefeller- 1 (12.5%)
    Howard Baker- 1 (12.5%)
    Edward Brooke- 1 (12.5%)
    Richard Nixon (Write-In)- 1 (12.5%)
    Total votes: 8 votes (100%)

    Second ballot coming soon.

    2nd ballot, Democrats:

    Governor George Wallace of Alabama
    Rep. Morris Udall of Arizona
    Senator Birch Bayh of Indiana
    Write-In

    The Southern and conservative factions of the Democrats have united to form a surprisingly strong bloc that almost clenched the nomination for Wallace. The liberals have rallied around Udall, while moderates hope to unite all blocs behind Bayh. Despite a large amount of write-in votes for the Rev. Jesse Jackson, Jackson has declined any attempt to draft him, saying that the party should unite behind Udall or Bayh to stop Wallace.

    2nd ballot, Republicans:

    Former Governor Ronald Reagan of California
    Senator Strom Thurmond of South Carolina
    President Nelson Rockefeller of New York
    Write-In

    The conservative faction of the GOP has rallied behind two conservatives, while the moderates and liberals were split between several candidates. After some discussion, all moderate and liberal candidates dropped out and endorsed Rockefeller in an attempt to stop the conservatives. Meanwhile, Nixon openly laughed after hearing about an attempt to draft him and declined to endorsed anyone, saying only to "vote for a f***ing viable candidate, idiots." ;)

    Time for you to vote on the second ballot!
     
  14. Puget Sound Stewart Brand Is Right!

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    Final results, 2nd ballot:

    Democrats:

    Wallace- 3 (50%)
    Udall- 2 (33%)
    Bayh- 1 (17%)
    Total votes: 6 (100%)

    Republicans:

    Thurmond- 4 (66%)
    Rockefeller- 2 (34%)

    New rule: Any candidate with 50% or more of the votes will win, instead of a majority, to speed up the process. Next ballot coming soon.
     
  15. Puget Sound Stewart Brand Is Right!

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    1st VP Ballot, Democrats:

    Senator Henry "Scoop" Jackson of Washington
    Senator Frank Church of Idaho
    Senator John Glenn of Ohio
    Governor Lester Maddox of Georgia
    Senator Edmund Muskie of Maine
    Speaker of the House Carl Albert of Oklahoma
    Write-in

    Wallace won a majority on the second ballot. Now, the Democrats have to select a VP. With liberals and moderates threatening a walkout and possible third party candidacy Wallace has endorsed Senator Henry "Scoop" Jackson of Washington in an attempt to reach out to his opponents and critics. Some liberals feel that Jackson is too moderate and hawkish for them and have placed Senator Frank Church of Idaho on the ballot. Moderates have attempted to try to unite the party by promoting their favored candidate Senator John Glenn of Ohio. Diehard Dixiecrats have gotten Governor Lester Maddox of Georgia on the ballot, and Northeasterners have placed favorite son Senator Edmund Muskie of Maine on the ballot. Finally, some Oklahomans have placed Speaker of the House Carl Albert on the ballot even through he isn't interested.

    1st VP Ballot, Republicans

    Governor Ronald Reagan of California
    Senator Richard Schweiker of Pennsylvania
    Vice President Gerald Ford of Michigan
    Attorney-General Elliot Richardson of Massachusetts
    Former Governor Harold Stassen of Minnesota
    Write-in

    Thurmond surprisingly got an endorsement from Ronald Reagan, who decided to drop out of the second ballot, thus enabling Thurmond's victory on the second ballot. It turns out that Thurmond had bribed Reagan with the offer of the vice-presidency. Angry liberals and many moderates have rallied behind Senator Richard Schweiker of Pennsylvania to show they still have power in the party, while the Stalwarts have advocated keeping Vice President Gerald Ford of Michigan. Some moderates are pushing Attorney-General Elliot Richardson of Massachusetts to try and bridge the divide between the different factions of the party, while former Governor Harold Stassen of Minnesota has somehow gotten his name on the ballot.
     
  16. Puget Sound Stewart Brand Is Right!

    Joined:
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    Lisa Kittredge has one point.

    Democrats, 1st VP ballot

    Frank Church- 3 (60%)
    Lester Maddox- 2 (40%)

    Republicans, 1st VP ballot

    Richard Schweiker- 3 (60%)
    Jerry Ford- 1 (20%)
    Harold Stassen- 1 (20%)

    The liberal faction of the Democrats managed to win the struggle for VP with support from moderates. It remains to be seen if Wallace and Church can actually work together to try and win the election, through...

    Moderates absolutely dominated the Republican ballot. Of note, some oldtimers actually managed to gather a small amount of support for Harold Stassen. Wonks have doubts about Thurmond's appeal outside the South, through...

    Final 1976 tickets:

    Governor George Wallace (D-AL)/Senator Frank Church of Idaho (D-ID)
    Senator Strom Thurmond (R-SC)/Senator Richard Schweiker (R-PA)

    Note that the Democrats are red in this universe and the Republicans are blue.

    1976 election results will be coming soon...
     
  17. Puget Sound Stewart Brand Is Right!

    Joined:
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    1976 Election:

    [​IMG]

    Governor George Wallace (D-AL)/Senator Frank Church of Idaho (D-ID): 270 electoral votes
    Senator Strom Thurmond (R-SC)/Senator Richard Schweiker (R-PA): 268 electoral votes

    1976 was a very odd election year. Both parties had nominated conservative Southerners and moderate or liberals as their running mate. The conservative top of the ticket and liberal bottom of the ticket for the Democrats frequently contradicted each other in their campaign speeches because of ideological differences preventing them from writing any better then a vague platform designed to at the very most leave all Democratic factions vaguely neither pleased or displeased. Meanwhile, Thurmond only managed to take two states (South Carolina and Georgia) away from the Solid Democratic South, but won much of the North, Midwest, and West by attacking Wallace's alleged extremism while playing down his own past actions. Wallace managed to win Michigan and West Virginia with his populist appeal to conservative union members, through. In the end, it all came down to Illinois, like in 1960, which Wallace won very narrowly thanks to Daley's Democratic machine there.

    Wallace's Term:

    Wallace has not been as anti-integrationist and conservative as expected, to many observers' surprise. In part, this is because of Vice President Church's and other liberal and moderate Democrats' influence in the administration, and also due to Wallace becoming a born-again Christian shortly into his term (this actually happened in RL, which allowed him to rally African-American voters for a final term as governor of Alabama in RL in the 80s) and softening on the race and other issues, since in his words, "We are all God's people." The administration has continued Nixon's policies of reducing effort for integration and continued the hard-line stance on crime (and a new harder stance against drugs), which is popular with many Americans. Union workers are highly supportive of many of Wallace's populist economic policies.

    However, the Arab oil embargo, along with the Iranian Revolution, has caused oil prices to continue to skyrocket, even with Vice President Church's and Secretary of the Interior Udall's attempts to quickly greenlight more American energy production (like nuclear and more oil drilling, along with funding for research into wind and solar power) and promote energy conservation. This has caused the economy to crash and inflation to spiral upwards, like in the RL 70s. Wallace and co have tried as best as they could to attempt to stimulate the economy, but they are not doing very well thanks to infighting not only over ideological differences, but on if they should fight inflation or unemployment first, also. Adding to the mid- 40s approval ratings is an unpopular invasion of Iran in the aftermath of the Iranian hostage crisis (which, admittedly, is doing kind of well) and a scandal over the revelation that the Daley machine in Chicago, which was vital to Wallace's election, is using its connections in the federal government to divert large amount of funds toward slush projects in Chicago.

    Democrats, 1st 1980 ballot:

    The Democrats are divided over rather to keep Wallace on and attempt to spin their way out of the situation with some of Wallace's more popular domestic policies or to drop him for a more moderate or liberal candidate which would distance the Democrats away from the more unpopular side of the administration but might make the Solid South, conservatives, and Northern conservative-populist union workers angry. Vice President Frank Church has declined any attempts to draft him to run against Wallace in an attempt at party unity.

    President George Wallace of Alabama
    Senator Birch Bayh of Indiana
    Former Governor John McKeithen of Louisiana
    Governor Jimmy Carter of Georgia
    Senator Ted Kennedy of Massachusetts
    Former Governor Cliff Finch of Mississippi
    Senator Walter Mondale of Minnesota
    Senator Henry “Scoop” Jackson of Washington
    Senator George McGovern of South Dakota
    Senator Terry Sanford of North Carolina

    Republicans, 1st 1980 ballot:

    The Republicans are feeling that they might have this one in the bag- thus causing all factions of the party to battle it out for the nomination. Can they quickly choose a candidate, or will they drag it out and hurt their chances? Thurmond has declined attempts to draft him to run again.

    Governor Ronald Reagan of California
    Representative John D. Anderson of Illinois
    Senator Howard Baker of Tennessee
    Former Representative George H.W Bush of Texas
    Senator Richard Schweiker of Pennsylvania
    Former Vice President Gerald Ford of Michigan
    Representative Phil Crane of Illinois
    Senator Bob Dole of Kansas
    Former Governor John Connally of Texas
    Former Governor Harold Stassen of Minnesota
     
    Last edited: Jan 13, 2015
  18. Puget Sound Stewart Brand Is Right!

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    Comrade James (AKA rpryor03) has earned one point!
     
  19. Puget Sound Stewart Brand Is Right!

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    [​IMG]
     
  20. Puget Sound Stewart Brand Is Right!

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    The wikibox that Comrade James made for the 1976 presidential election:

    [​IMG]