List of Alternative Formula 1 World Drivers Champions

Discussion in 'Alternate History Discussion: After 1900' started by Chipperback, Dec 3, 2011.

  1. Chipperback The World Is Coming to Kansas City 2016

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    The Walker-Squier-Economaki List of Alternative Motorsports Champs

    We get alternative lists of Prime Ministers and Presidents...
    Why not F1 World Champs too...Cue "The Chain" ;)


    1950 – Juan Manuel Fangio (ARG) Alfa Romeo
    1951 –Jose Frolian Gonzalez (ARG) Alfa Romeo
    1952 – Alberto Ascari (ITA) Ferrari
    1953 – Alberto Ascari (ITA) Ferrari
    1954 – Juan Manuel Fangio (ARG) Mercedes
    1955 – Alberto Ascari (ITA) Ferrari (1)
    1956 – Juan Manuel Fangio (ARG) Mercedes
    1957 – Juan Manuel Fangio (ARG) Mercedes
    1958 – Alberto Ascari (ITA) Ferrari
    1959 – Sterling Moss (GBR) Walker Cooper-Climax (2)
    1960 – Jack Brabham (AUS) Walker Cooper-Climax
    1961 – Jack Brabham (AUS) Walker Cooper-Climax
    1962 – Dan Gurney (USA) Ferrari (3)
    1963 – Jim Clark (SCT) Lotus
    1964 – Dan Gurney (USA) Ferrari
    1965 – Jim Clark (SCT) Lotus
    1966 – Jim Clark (SCT) Lotus
    1967 – Dan Gurney (USA) AAR Eagle-Shelby
    1968 – Graham Hill (GBR) Lotus-Ford
    1969 – Jim Clark (SCT) Lotus-Ford
    1970 – Jacky Ickx (BEL) Ferrari
    1971 – Jackie Stewart (SCT) Tyrrell-Ford
    1972 – Jackie Stewart (SCT) Tyrrell-Ford
    1973 – Jackie Stewart (SCT) Tyrrell-Ford
    1974 – Francois Cevert (FRA) Tyrrell-Ford
    1975 – James Hunt (GBR) Hesketh BRM
    1976 – Niki Lauda (AUT) Ferrari
    1977 – A.J. Foyt Lotus-Ford (USA) (4)
    1978 – Mario Andretti (USA) Lotus-Ford
    1979 – Lella Lombardi (ITA) Hesketh BRM (5)


    1980 – FISA – Jean-Pierre Jabouille (FRA) Renault
    FOCA – Emerson Fittipaldi (BRA) Brabham-Ford (6)

    1981 – FISA – Francois Cevert (FRA) Renault
    FOCA – Nelson Piquet (BRA) Brabham-Ford (7)

    1982 – FISA – Gilles Villeneuve (CAN) Ferrari
    FOCA – Tiff Needell (GBR) Tyrrell Project Four-Ford (8)

    1983 – Gilles Villenueve (CAN) Ferrari (9)
    1984 – Nelson Piquet (BRA) Brabham-TAG Porsche
    1985 – Keke Rosberg (FIN) Tyrrell Project Four- Honda
    1986 – Elio De Angelis (ITA) Brabham-TAG Porsche
    1987 – Nigel Mansell (GBR) Tyrrell Project Four – Honda
    1988 – Ayrton Senna (BRA) Brabham-TAG Porsche (10)
    1989 – Stefan Bellof (GER) Brabham-TAG Porsche (11)
    1990 – Alain Prost (FRA) Ferrari
    1991 – Ayrton Senna (BRA) Brabham-TAG Porsche
    1992 – Nigel Mansell (GBR) Williams-Honda
    1993 – Uyko Katayama (JPN) Williams-Honda (12)
    1994 – Ayrton Senna (BRA) Williams-Honda
    1995 – Michael Schumacher (GER) Jordan-Mercedes
    1996 – Michael Schumacher (GER) Jordan-Mercedes
    1997 – Jeff Gordon (USA) Stewart/Tyrrell-Ford (13)
    1998 – Perry McCarthy (GBR) Jordan-Mercedes (14)
    1999 – Mika Hakkinen (FIN) Prost EuroFrance-Renault
    2000 – Michael Schumacher (GER) Jordan-Mercedes
    2001 – Alex Zanardi (ITA) Ferrari (15)
    2002 – Jeff Gordon (USA) Stewart/Tyrrell-Ford
    2003 – Alex Zanardi (ITA) Ferrari
    2004 – Juan Pablo Montoya (COL) Prodrive Lotus-Proton (16)
    2005 – Alex Zanardi (ITA) Ferrari
    2006 – Fernando Alonso (ESP) Prost EuroFrance-Renault
    2007 – Fernando Alonso (ESP) Prost EuroFrance-Renault
    2008 – Jenson Button (GBR) Jordan-Mercedes
    2009 – Lewis Hamilton (GBR) Stewart/Tyrrell-Ford
    2010 – Mark Webber (AUS) Brock HDT-Holden (17)
    2011 – Sebastian Vettel (GER) Jordan-Mercedes (18)
    2012 -- It begins in Mandelaburg :) (19)

    (1) Ascari would live well into his 80s, became a beloved Grand Prix commentator for RAI Italia much like Murray Walker in OTL

    (2) Sterling Moss is one of only three men who has won the Formula 1 Championship and the Indianapolis 500 in the same year. Joining Jim Clark (’65) and A.J. Foyt (’77). Moss, at age 92, is still alive and well…and get still racing! Moss won a round in the Thermex Historic Touring Car Championship in the ‘11 and had 4 other podium finishes. He plans to contest the year and he’s will test to get a competition license for the Spa and Silverstone 24-hour events.

    (3) Dan Gurney was the first American World Champion as a driver ('62) and the first American World Champion as a team principal and constructor ('67). The Gurney name is legendary not only in Motorsport, but in the automotive industry. After retiring from active competition in 1971, Gurney's All-American Racers became an engineering consulting firm and a technology investment firm that morphed into the powerful multibillion-dollar Gurney Group by 1981. Gurney is best known in business for saving the British car industry with his acquisitions of British Motor Corporation in 1982, and today the Gurney Austin Rover Motors is well-known for it's line of exciting performance passenger cars that are also very practical and forward thinking. Gurney Austin Rover is also hotly competitive in the World Rally Championship led by the powerhouse M-Sport Stobart team and reigning World Champion Matthew Wilson. Gurney is also known for his maverick independent-libertarian candidacy for President of the United States in 1992. "DAN GURNEY FOR PRESIDENT " bumper stickers were on bumpers of sports cars across America and Gurney's square jawed bluntness and smarts won 26% of the popular vote and carried 4 states (California, Indiana, Kentucky and North Carolina). He didn't win, but he made an impression.

    (4) A.J. Foyt was brought into Lotus along with Mario Andretti to form “Colin Chapman’s American Dream Team” which developed the groundbreaking Lotus 78 and Lotus 79.


    (5) The Tigress of Turin is the first woman to win a Grand Prix (she did that in ‘75), and 1979 she shocked everybody with 3 wins in a wild championship season that came down to the final race. She is one of six women who has won a Formula 1 Grand Prix. Other winners: Divina Gallica (’81), Michele Mouton (’85), Victoria Butler-Henderson (’95), Vanina Ickx (’01), Katherine Legge (’10), it is expected that Danica Patrick will join this list as she joins Lewis Hamilton at Stewart/Tyrrell in 2012.

    (6) Due to an impasse on a number of issue Federation du Sport Automobile and Formula One Constructors Association run separate Formula 1 seasons
    (7) Bernie and Jean-Marie couldn't work out their differences
    (8) "You'll sooner see Margaret Thatcher in her bed riding Arthur Scargill than seeing a united Grand Prix Championship" -- James Hunt during a BBC "Grand Prix" broacast, 1982. "James...I don't even want to think about that," Murray Walker, 1982.


    (9) PEACE IS IN OUR TIME! The 1983 Eccelstone-Balestre Agreement ends the FISA-FOCA War opening to door to a great 1983 season and Gilles Villenueve winning a unified title. Under the terms of the agreement, the 1980, 1981 and 1982 winners of both series are consider official “World Drivers Champions” in the record books.

    Oh and Gilles Villenueve. Lives back in Bethierville, Quebec Canada. He's a agent to a number of drivers, including his son Jacques, who is a 2-time Indianapolis 500 winner and an 11-time Grand Prix winner. Villenueve is also president of Speedway Canada Ltd, which is the marketing and organizing arm of the Grand Prix of Canada in addition to administering the site of the Grand Prix of Canada, Circuit Rene Lesvesque in Montreal.


    (10) The last turbo season.

    (11) The first season under the 1989 Eccelstone-Balestre Agreement calling for a 3.5 liter naturally-aspirated engine formula allowing Engines up to 12 cylinders. Porsche’s innovative W-12 was formidable as Bellof nipped Senna to win the championship and the left the team cited Senna’s constant polickticking and complaining.

    (12) Taking the seat for a vacated Nigel Mansell, who left for IndyCar after contentious contract dispute, Kamikaze Uyko has a 6-win dream season to be the first Japanese World Champion.

    (13) The 26-year old American was the first World Champ from the USA since ’78, and would leave F1 after the 2009 season as the winningest American driver in Formula 1 history. Gordon is semiretired from racing (he still competes at Indianapolis, Daytona and LeMans), a happy husband to his actress wife Keeley Hawes-Gordon, and a father of two. Next year, you'll hear him giving his commentary as part of the BBC's broadcast team for the F1 coverage in 2012 and Americans will get to see him, too! Formula One Administration Chairman Damon Hill announced this week that BBC America has been awarded the U.S. broadcast rights for Formula for the next four years.

    Oh by the way...Where is Damon? Graham's son is considered "The greatest man on 2 wheels, PERIOD". Hill is a 16-time motorcycle world champion, and led the transition into the MotoGP format. Hill was tapped to replace Bernie Eccelstone as chairman of the FOA after Eccelstone was indicted on allegations of securities fraud.

    (14) He was Flat Out. He wasn’t Flat Broke..and yes, he is the Stig on ITTL’s version of “Top Gear”

    (15) Alex Zanardi has both his legs, and he’s starting his own F1 team in 2012. Scuderia Zanardi Rapide, with engines provided by Honda. His team drivers will be veteran Giancarlo Fischiella and GP2 Champion and former Indy 500 winner Marco Andretti.

    (16) Juan Pablo Montoya shocked everyone with the Malaysian-British David Richards Prodrive team’s miracle debut.

    (17) Taking advantage of some loopholes in the aerodynamics rules, Mark Webber and Peter Brock caught all of Formula 1 with their collective pants down like Braun GP did OTL.

    (18) A dominant 10 win season as Vettel handed Eddie Jordan his sixth driver's title and an 8th Constructors Championship.

    (19) The circus begins next march at New Kylami International Speedway, Mandelaburg, Republic of South Africa.
     
    Last edited: Dec 8, 2011
  2. TheMann Canuckwanker in Chief

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    Well, this is a very interesting list indeed...... Not that think its a bad one.

    I don't disagree with any of them up to Dan Gurney. Gurney with Ferrari is a possibility, but I don't know if Gurney and Ferrari could live with each other long enough to win it all, especially twice. It is possible, though. Gurney and Carroll Shelby were Goodyear's point-men with their quest to beat Firestone, and when Ford signed on the rest was history.

    Cevert winning the title is good, though this means that Fittipaldi does not hold a 30-year record for the youngest champ. (It took Alonso to beat it.) Lella Lombardi I don't think is honestly talented enough to be a world champ, especially up against the likes of Gilles Villeneuve, Jody Sckehter, Alan Jones, Mario Andretti, Niki Lauda, Nelson Piquet, Ronnie Peterson, James Hunt, Clay Regazzoni, Rene Arnoux and in this universe, A.J. Foyt and probably Francois Cevert. That's rather a lot more than Miss Lombardi can handle, unless her car is dominantly good (as Mario and Foyt were in the '77 and '78 seasons) and her teammate sucks. I'd regard that as very unlikely.

    Good move with the split series being unified, though it is going to make a bunch of unhappy event promoters, because two separate series into one means events will almost certainly be left out. The 1980 season was 14 rounds, and with the addiction of the races for the separate FOCA-FISA seasons, you'll have 22 rounds at least between the two, and I doubt you can merge that many.

    Gilles Villeneuve and Stefan Bellof as champs is something that should have been but never was. There hasn't been and I doubt ever will be again two guys like those two, who both had natural talent in incredible quantities and the balls to use it. Both of them would be loved by guys like AJ Foyt, because they just would not give up, ever, no matter the odds and no matter the problems. Ask Derek Bell about Bellof and the guy tears up, because the two of them were teammates with very fond memories of one another, and Bellof's drive in the final World Sportscar Championship race at the old Nurburgring in 1983 is still something that sportscar nuts have never forgotten.

    Ukyo Katayama and Jeff Gordon as world champions? Holy s***:
    - Ukyo's a better bet to be world champ than Lombardi, as while Ukyo not exactly the world's greatest driving talent, he was near the top, and he'd be one hell of a change for the better after Mansell takes off - Mansell was an arrogant prick his whole career, whereas Katayama might have been the most humble guy to take the wheel of an F1 car in modern times. His cancer in his back is gonna leave him out for a fair bit of 1995, but if Williams is that good (and OTL, they were close to it) then I can see him as world champ.
    - Jeff Gordon, well, he always had the talent to be a world champion. This would have to assume he has more road racing experience, or perhaps he goes into Indycars and does what Villeneuve did - kick ass in 1994-95, run F1 in '96, world champ in his sophomore year.

    That's a great end for Zanardi, though I suspect by 2012 he'd want to retire and live life more slowly. He was offered a seat back in Champ Car repeatedly, and was offered it again after the Champ Car-IRL merger - him and Jimmy Vasser, who is part owner of KV Racing Technology, are great friends. He didn't take it, of course. (I wish he'd had. The first time a guy on one leg wins an Indycar race it'll make headlines around the world.)

    Mandelaburg? Sorry man, it'll still be Johannesburg. I'm pretty sure Nelson Mandela would NOT want South Africa's largest city named after him. He's much too humble for that.
     
  3. Chipperback The World Is Coming to Kansas City 2016

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    OTL Gurney drove for Ferrari, but left to go to Porsche at to a new Italian rival team. Neither panned out. Had Gurney stayed in a V-12 Ferrari, it would have been fun to watch him and Jim Clark. Clark often said Gurney was the only man on the track he truly feared.

    When you have Lord Alexander Hesketh on your side, unlikely tends to get likely and ITTL, he bought the assets of BRM and got some engineers instead of a kit car. He had two good cars for the '75 and '79 championships. With a solid mount, she was able to bring it home..Besides, I needed a couple of curveballs on this.

    Gilles Villeneuve is in my top 10 all-time period. What would have happened had Jacky Ickx didn't stop the '84 Monaco Grand Prix? Imagine Senna vs. Bellof in the rain for the win.

    I'm researching a timeline on Jeff Gordon: Grand Prix Superstar
     
  4. DrakonFin Extreme Centrist

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    The Land of the Northern Lights
    What, no Keke Rosberg?

    I am disappointed in you.;)

    Seriously though, if there was no championship for Rosberg, who knows what butterflies that would have with Häkkinen's career. Maybe he would have gone to rally instead - IOTL he followed pretty closely in Rosberg's footsteps. The same applies to the younger Finnish drivers, certainly.
     
  5. Lemon flavoured British Miami Dolphins fan

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    I like Ukyo Katayama winning one lol. One of my friends at school was a huge fan of his lol.
     
  6. Chipperback The World Is Coming to Kansas City 2016

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    Keke Rosberg won the 1985 World Championship in his third season with Tyrrell Project Four. His '85 effort was unbelievable. Five Grand Prix wins (Monaco, Detroit, Silverstone, Osterrriechring, and Australia) including setting the Formula 1 record for fastest qualifying lap.)

    After the 1986 season. Rosberg citing a distaste for the F1 scene, left Tyrrell in Formula 1 for a wild diversion in the United States. Rosberg would drive in the NASCAR Winston Cup Series for stock car legend Bud Moore. In six season in NASCAR, Rosberg would win 15 races, including a stirring drive on Labor Day 1990 to win the crown jewel Southern 500.

    Today, Keke Rosberg is CEO of Suomi Sports Management and is considered one of the foremost sports agents in the European Union. His clients include 1999 Formula 1 and 2003 World Rally Champion Mika Hakkinen, Former World Rally Champion J.J. Lehto, and 1999 IndyCar Champion Mika Salo. His son Nico Rosberg drives in Formula 1, signing a contract to drive for the newly formed Fashionista Formula 1 Team.
     
  7. DrakonFin Extreme Centrist

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    All right, that's more like it.:D

    Who would definitely see the OTL as a cruel joke, and don't mean just his Formula 1 career.
     
  8. Chipperback The World Is Coming to Kansas City 2016

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    Jun 22, 2011
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    My Formula 1 List: Where are they now?

    Retired in Australia and enjoying the success of his sons Geoff and David, who run a successful V8 Supercar Series team.



    Jimmy Clark is on the short list of greatest racers ever, just ask Robin Miller

    Clark retired in 1971 with 33 Grand Prix wins, 4 World Championship, 2 Indy 500 victories ('65 and '66), 2 LeMans overall victories, 5 NASCAR Grand National (now Cup Series victories), and 2 RAC Rally wins...he also has 4 career USAC Spring Wins, including being the first driver to win The Night Before The 500 and then the Indianapolis 500 on back-to-back days (Clark did that in 1966. Since then, Tony Stewart has done that twice.)

    Today Clark lives on a nice country estate outside of Edinburgh. He the founder of the Clark-Chapman Driving Academy at Jim Clark Autodrome, the site of the Scottish Grand Prix.

    Graham Hill retired in 1975, and since then is enjoying his second life as a writer, aviator and television and radio presenter. He's also very proud of his son, Motorcycle racing legend/Formula One Chairman Damon Hill.

    President/CEO of Spa-Francochamps Racing Ltd. and in training to get back in the cockpit to be a co-driver with his daughter Vanina for an unusual quest. This father-daughter team will enter every major 24-hour event in the world in 2012. (Daytona, LeMans, Spa, Nurburgring, Silverstone, Atlanta, and Fuji)


    Team Principal Emeritus of Tyrrell/Stewart Grand Prix Ltd.. Captain of Industry. Happy hubby to Helen. Proud pop to his son/business partner Paul. Pretty much what he is in OTL.
    But Jackie's influence in racing and on race drivers is even stronger ITTL.


    The French two-time champion is nicknamed "Monsieur Francois Stewart" in the French press. Truly a protege of Jackie Stewart on the track and off.
    He left Tyrrell in 1977 to help Renault begin their Formula 1 Turbo programme. During that time, Cevert picked up where Stewart left off as a outspoken voice among the drivers in matters of safety, and driver contracts. Cevert, as President of the F-1 Pilots Guild, authored and pushed through the Drivers Rights Provisions that are a key piece of the 1983 Eccelstone-Balestre agreement and are part of part of every binding formula since. Cevert also led the successful ban on South African participation in the World Championship. Ironically, after the ban was lifted in 1994, Cevert became a member of the board of directors of the New Kylami International Circuit.
    Cevert today is a successful technologies financier through his firm Techniques Cevert. He is on the corporate board of Elf Aquitaine and is a major behind-the-scenes player in French politics. Many observers think that Cevert's support of Segolene Royal could finally elevate her into the French Presidency in the elections in 2012.

    Foyt ran in Formula 1 from 1975-1980 for team Lotus. He had 10 career victories in the 1977 World Championship. Along the way he became a cult figure in Britain in addition to be a legend in America.
    Foyt retired from competition in 1993, and since then has been an owner in the U.S. IndyCar series were he has 3 Indy 500 wins as an owner, including this years surprising upset win by Ana Beatriz in a Chevrolet powered- Foyt Coyote.

    Chairman of Championship Auto Racing Teams (CART) from 1996-2002. Andretti was instrumental in ending the 1995 split between CART and Tony George's Indy Racing League. Andretti is still a major influence in American motorsport. His son Michael runs Andretti Autosport IndyCar and his other son Jeff is based in London and managing the career of young American F1 drivers Marco Andretti, Kyle Busch, and Alex Rossi.

    "The First Lady of Formula 1". 1979 World Champion. She sadly died this past year after a long bout against breast cancer, but she was a strident voice not just for women in the race car, but women in society.
    Lombardi has the F1 records for most starts by a female driver and most wins by a female driver (9 career victories)
    She is best known on the track for an epic comeback win in the 1979 Italian Grand Prix that powered her championship in a year where 7 drivers had a chance to win the championship going into the final race.

    She left formula 1 in 1984, but continued driving sports cars. Race fans will long remember the hot pink and silver Porsche 962 campaigned by Lombardi along with Lyn St. James and Divina Gallica at the 1988 24 hours LeMans, and the loud cheers when the car led the race for 2 hours and ended up finishing third behind the Silk Cut Jaguars.

    When not in Sportscars, she was an activist and an elected member of Italy's Parliament. In 1997 she was drafted by to run by the Women's Social Democratic Forum of Italy, and won a seat. Her Legislative career is best remembered for a 2007 incident when she slapped Italian PM Silvio Burlesconi because he called her the "that unattractive manly bitch from Turin" during PM's questions. Her actions got her censured in the parliament, but applauded by women throughout Italy.

    Today he is known as Dr. Ayrton Senna. Professor of Theology at the Pontifical Catholic University of São Paulo

    He is one of the most popular professors at the university. His classes attract a great deal of students partly for he who is today, as one of the most influencial and controversial voices in Roman Catholicism, and partly for who he was as a brilliant, 3-time Formula 1 Champion, and 2-time Indianapolis 500 winner.

    Senna began his studies after the 1991 Formula 1 season. After winning the 1994 F1 title. He took two years off from racing to attend PUC-SP where he threw himself into his education. After earning a degree in theology in 1996, he decided to return to racing. In 1997, he did what he called his "Racing For A Better World", where he did a slate of events worldwide and gave all his winning to charities in Brazil and throughout the world. Those charities got a nice haul in May 1997. Senna, driving for Fittipaldi Racing Brazil, dominated the Month of May and won the Indianapolis 500 for the first time. He won it again in 2001, the year he left active competition for good and embarked on his new career as a academic and a writer.

    Senna is often compared to Dr. Cornell West for his outspoken, brash nature and a popularity that transcends many strata of society. In his native Sao Paulo he is loved by the common people, and makes politicians on all sides of the political fence cringe and keeps the Church leadership on their toes.

    He has written 7 books centering around theology and social issues. in addition to his only book on his racing career, Fé , Paixão e Vitória. (Faith, Passion and Victory) The book, written in 2006, was as much a self-help book as it was a very insightful race-by-race view of his career.

    Senna has hinted that he may do LeMans in 2012 as a fundraiser for a group of São Paulo-based charities and for the University's scholarship fund. He's already gotten interests from Helio Castroneves and Tony Kanaan to put a couple of teams together.
     
    Last edited: Dec 10, 2011
  9. Chipperback The World Is Coming to Kansas City 2016

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    More Where Are They Now: Uyko Katayama

    "Kamikaze Uyko" has a cult following worldwide. The affable, humble Japanese champion is seen by some as "accidental" champion, but such belittles him unjustly. Uyko Katayama was a talented race driver, it just so happened that in 1993 he had a good chance to prove it.

    The story in Formula 1 in 1992 was the acrimony between Frank Williams and Nigel Mansell over Mansell's contract for 1993 and 1994. Mansell accused Williams and Honda of trying to force him out, so they can make a run gaining the services of Michael Schumacher, the subject of a fierce bidding war among F1's top teams.
    Mansell left after winning the championship, but Schumacher stayed loyal to Mercedes, who joined forces with Eddie Jordan.
    Running of time and needing a driver to fill the seat, Frank Williams took an educated gamble based on what he saw from a plucky midfielder from Japan in 1992.

    Uyko Katayama, driving for Footwork Arrows along side fellow Japanese Aguri Suzuki, drove beyond the limits of a backfield car to score 27 points and podium twice, including a bonzai drive in Hungary that nearly gave the team a win.
    His performance impressed Williams enough to make him the #2 driver along side Jean Alesi for 1993, but Katayama grabbed the opportunity and outshined his teammate.

    He had six wins in '93. San Marino, France, Britain, Germany, Japan and Australia, the last two wins in the final races of the year completing a comeback to beat both Ayrton Senna and Alain Prost.

    In 1994, Katayama had 4 more wins and finished second in the championship to teammate Ayrton Senna, who said "Katayama is the best teammate I've ever had and man with more heart in the car than I could ever begin to have."

    Katayama drove most of the season intense pain. Near the end of the season, it was found out that he was diagonosed with cancer. Doctor told him he'd recover but never race again.

    It was three years of torturous treatment and training, but Kamikaze Uyko did return to a cockpit. In 1997, he got a special gift from a former teammate who respected him a great deal. Ayrton Senna pushed Emerson Fittipaldi to enter a third car in the Indianapolis 500 for Katayama. On bump day, Katayama put up a stirring drive to make the field, starting 31st. On race day Katayama drove a fast, clean race to a 5th place finish. He would have been rookie of the year, if Senna hadn't have won the race in his first 500 start.

    Katayama did one more season in Formula 1. In 1999, he drove for Team DOME-Mugen Japan as a favor to former teammate/team principal Aguri Suzuki. Katayama again put up a stirring season, scoring 16 points, and a podium finish with a 3rd in Japan. After the season, Katayama hung up the helmet for good, and now is a racing commentator for Fuji TV.

    A major motion picture on Katayama's career championship and comeback is in the works. The screenplay was written by Ken Takakura and filming is expected to start in summer 2012.
     
    Last edited: Dec 7, 2011
  10. Just Leo Curmudgeon with a heart of gold

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    Credit where credit is due, John Surtees won the title in 1964 over Gurney. Surtees was the only man to take world championship titles on two and four wheels. Mike Hailwood and Giocomo Agostini tried but failed. John crashed at Mosport in 1965 in a Lola T70 Chev. I was there.
     
  11. Chipperback The World Is Coming to Kansas City 2016

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    Leo, I think we can do that...

    1950 – Juan Manuel Fangio (ARG) Alfa Romeo
    1951 –Jose Frolian Gonzalez (ARG) Alfa Romeo
    1952 – Alberto Ascari (ITA) Ferrari
    1953 – Alberto Ascari (ITA) Ferrari
    1954 – Juan Manuel Fangio (ARG) Mercedes
    1955 – Alberto Ascari (ITA) Ferrari (1)
    1956 – Juan Manuel Fangio (ARG) Mercedes
    1957 – Juan Manuel Fangio (ARG) Mercedes
    1958 – Alberto Ascari (ITA) Ferrari
    1959 – Sterling Moss (GBR) Walker Cooper-Climax (2)
    1960 – Jack Brabham (AUS) Walker Cooper-Climax
    1961 – Jack Brabham (AUS) Walker Cooper-Climax
    1962 – Dan Gurney (USA) Ferrari (3)
    1963 – Jim Clark (SCT) Lotus
    1964 – John Surtees (GBR) Ferrari (20)
    1965 – Jim Clark (SCT) Lotus
    1966 – Jim Clark (SCT) Lotus
    1967 – Dan Gurney (USA) AAR Eagle-Shelby
    1968 – Graham Hill (GBR) Lotus-Ford
    1969 – Jim Clark (SCT) Lotus-Ford
    1970 – Jacky Ickx (BEL) Ferrari
    1971 – Jackie Stewart (SCT) Tyrrell-Ford
    1972 – Jackie Stewart (SCT) Tyrrell-Ford
    1973 – Jackie Stewart (SCT) Tyrrell-Ford
    1974 – Francois Cevert (FRA) Tyrrell-Ford
    1975 – James Hunt (GBR) Hesketh BRM
    1976 – Niki Lauda (AUT) Ferrari
    1977 – A.J. Foyt Lotus-Ford (USA) (4)
    1978 – Mario Andretti (USA) Lotus-Ford
    1979 – Lella Lombardi (ITA) Hesketh BRM (5)


    1980 – FISA – Jean-Pierre Jabouille (FRA) Renault
    FOCA – Emerson Fittipaldi (BRA) Brabham-Ford (6)

    1981 – FISA – Francois Cevert (FRA) Renault
    FOCA – Nelson Piquet (BRA) Brabham-Ford (7)

    1982 – FISA – Gilles Villeneuve (CAN) Ferrari
    FOCA – Tiff Needell (GBR) Tyrrell Project Four-Ford (8)

    1983 – Gilles Villenueve (CAN) Ferrari (9)
    1984 – Nelson Piquet (BRA) Brabham-TAG Porsche
    1985 – Keke Rosberg (FIN) Tyrrell Project Four- Honda
    1986 – Elio De Angelis (ITA) Brabham-TAG Porsche
    1987 – Nigel Mansell (GBR) Tyrrell Project Four – Honda
    1988 – Ayrton Senna (BRA) Brabham-TAG Porsche (10)
    1989 – Stefan Bellof (GER) Brabham-TAG Porsche (11)
    1990 – Alain Prost (FRA) Ferrari
    1991 – Ayrton Senna (BRA) Brabham-TAG Porsche
    1992 – Nigel Mansell (GBR) Williams-Honda
    1993 – Uyko Katayama (JPN) Williams-Honda (12)
    1994 – Ayrton Senna (BRA) Williams-Honda
    1995 – Michael Schumacher (GER) Jordan-Mercedes
    1996 – Michael Schumacher (GER) Jordan-Mercedes
    1997 – Jeff Gordon (USA) Stewart/Tyrrell-Ford (13)
    1998 – Perry McCarthy (GBR) Jordan-Mercedes (14)
    1999 – Mika Hakkinen (FIN) Prost EuroFrance-Renault
    2000 – Michael Schumacher (GER) Jordan-Mercedes
    2001 – Alex Zanardi (ITA) Ferrari (15)
    2002 – Jeff Gordon (USA) Stewart/Tyrrell-Ford
    2003 – Alex Zanardi (ITA) Ferrari
    2004 – Juan Pablo Montoya (COL) Prodrive Lotus-Proton (16)
    2005 – Alex Zanardi (ITA) Ferrari
    2006 – Fernando Alonso (ESP) Prost EuroFrance-Renault
    2007 – Fernando Alonso (ESP) Prost EuroFrance-Renault
    2008 – Jenson Button (GBR) Jordan-Mercedes
    2009 – Lewis Hamilton (GBR) Stewart/Tyrrell-Ford
    2010 – Mark Webber (AUS) Brock HDT-Holden (17)
    2011 – Sebastian Vettel (GER) Jordan-Mercedes (18)
    2012 -- It begins at New Kylami :) (19)

    (1) Ascari would live well into his 80s, became a beloved Grand Prix commentator for RAI Italia much like Murray Walker in OTL

    (2) Sterling Moss is one of only three men who has won the Formula 1 Championship and the Indianapolis 500 in the same year. Joining Jim Clark (’65) and A.J. Foyt (’77). Moss, at age 92, is still alive and well…and get still racing! Moss won a round in the Thermex Historic Touring Car Championship in the ‘11 and had 4 other podium finishes. He plans to contest the year and he’s will test to get a competition license for the Spa and Silverstone 24-hour events.

    (3) Dan Gurney was the first American World Champion as a driver ('62) and the first American World Champion as a team principal and constructor ('67). The Gurney name is legendary not only in Motorsport, but in the automotive industry. After retiring from active competition in 1971, Gurney's All-American Racers became an engineering consulting firm and a technology investment firm that morphed into the powerful multibillion-dollar Gurney Group by 1981. Gurney is best known in business for saving the British car industry with his acquisitions of British Motor Corporation in 1982, and today the Gurney Austin Rover Motors is well-known for it's line of exciting performance passenger cars that are also very practical and forward thinking. Gurney Austin Rover is also hotly competitive in the World Rally Championship led by the powerhouse M-Sport Stobart team and reigning World Champion Matthew Wilson. Gurney is also known for his maverick independent-libertarian candidacy for President of the United States in 1992. "DAN GURNEY FOR PRESIDENT " bumper stickers were on bumpers of sports cars across America and Gurney's square jawed bluntness and smarts won 26% of the popular vote and carried 4 states (California, Indiana, Kentucky and North Carolina). He didn't win, but he made an impression.

    (4) A.J. Foyt was brought into Lotus along with Mario Andretti to form “Colin Chapman’s American Dream Team” which developed the groundbreaking Lotus 78 and Lotus 79.


    (5) The Tigress of Turin is the first woman to win a Grand Prix (she did that in ‘75), and 1979 she shocked everybody with 3 wins in a wild championship season that came down to the final race. She is one of six women who has won a Formula 1 Grand Prix. Other winners: Divina Gallica (’81), Michele Mouton (’85), Victoria Butler-Henderson (’95), Vanina Ickx (’01), Katherine Legge (’10), it is expected that Danica Patrick will join this list as she joins Lewis Hamilton at Stewart/Tyrrell in 2012.

    (6) Due to an impasse on a number of issue Federation du Sport Automobile and Formula One Constructors Association run separate Formula 1 seasons
    (7) Bernie and Jean-Marie couldn't work out their differences
    (8) "You'll sooner see Margaret Thatcher in her bed riding Arthur Scargill than seeing a united Grand Prix Championship" -- James Hunt during a BBC "Grand Prix" broacast, 1982. "James...I don't even want to think about that," Murray Walker, 1982.


    (9) PEACE IN OUR TIME! The 1983 Eccelstone-Balestre Agreement ends the FISA-FOCA War opening to door to a great 1983 season and Gilles Villenueve winning a unified title. Under the terms of the agreement, the 1980, 1981 and 1982 winners of both series are consider official “World Drivers Champions” in the record books.

    Oh and Gilles Villenueve. Lives back in Bethierville, Quebec Canada. He's an agent to a number of drivers, including his son Jacques, who is a 2-time Indianapolis 500 winner and an 11-time Grand Prix winner. Villenueve is also president of Speedway Canada Ltd, which is the marketing and organizing arm of the Grand Prix of Canada in addition to administering the site of the Grand Prix of Canada, Circuit Rene Lesvesque in Montreal.


    (10) The last turbo season.

    (11) The first season under the 1989 Eccelstone-Balestre Agreement calling for a 3.5 liter Engine formula allowing Engines up to 12 cylinders. Porsche’s innovative W-12 was formidable as Bellof nipped Senna to win the championship and the left the team cited Senna’s constant polickticking and complaining.

    (12) Taking the seat for a vacated Nigel Mansell, who left for IndyCar after contentious contract dispute, Kamikaze Uyko has a 6-win dream season to be the first Japanese World Champion.

    (13) The 26-year old American was the first World Champ from the USA since ’78, and would leave F1 after the 2009 season as the winningest American driver in Formula 1 history. Gordon is semiretired from racing (he still competes at Indianapolis, Daytona and LeMans), a happy husband to his actress wife Keeley Hawes-Gordon, and a father of two. Next year, you'll hear him giving his commentary as part of the BBC's broadcast team for the F1 coverage in 2012 and Americans will get to see him, too! Formula One Administration Chairman Damon Hill announced this week that BBC America has been awarded the U.S. broadcast rights for Formula 1 for the next four years.

    Oh by the way...Where is Damon? Graham's son is considered "The greatest man on 2 wheels, PERIOD". Hill is a 16-time motorcycle world champion, and led the transition into the MotoGP format. Hill was tapped to replace Bernie Eccelstone as chairman of the FOA after Eccelstone was indicted on allegations of securities fraud.

    (14) He was Flat Out. He wasn’t Flat Broke..and yes, he is the Stig ITTL’s version of “Top Gear”

    (15) Alex Zanardi has both his legs, and he’s starting his own F1 team in 2012. Scuderia Zanardi Rapide, with engines provided by Honda. His team drivers will be veteran Giancarlo Fischiella and GP2 Champion and former Indy 500 winner Marco Andretti.

    (16) Juan Pablo Montoya shocked everyone with the Malaysian-British David Richards Prodrive team’s miracle debut.

    (17) Taking advantage of some loopholes in the aerodynamics rules, Mark Webber and Peter Brock caught all of Formula 1 with their collective pants down like Braun GP did OTL.

    (18) A dominant 10 win season as Vettel handed Eddie Jordan his sixth driver's title and an 8th Constructors Championship.

    (19) The circus begins next march at New Kylami International Speedway. A total rebuild of the original Kylami, including the sexy 1 mile downhill straightaway from hell. :)

    (20) John Surtees is the only man to win world championships on 2 wheels and 4 wheels...Although a lot of people think Fernando Alonso may seriously threaten to turn the trick after a great MotoGP season in 2011. ;)
     
    Last edited: Dec 7, 2011
  12. Just Leo Curmudgeon with a heart of gold

    Joined:
    Aug 19, 2009
    Location:
    Eville
    On behalf of John and myself, thank you.
     
  13. Chipperback The World Is Coming to Kansas City 2016

    Joined:
    Jun 22, 2011
    Location:
    Hartford, Connecticut UCNE/Omaha, Nebraska GPUR
    A different list -- Alternative Indianapolis 500 winners

    A list of Indianapolis 500 winners post World War II

    1946 George Robson (USA) Adams-Sparks
    1947 Mauri Rose (USA) Deidt-Offenhauser
    1948 Mauri Rose (USA) Deidt-Offenhauser
    1949 Bill Holland (USA) Deidt-Offenhauser
    1950 Johnnie Parsons (USA) Kurtis Kraft-Offenhauser
    1951 Lee Willard (USA) Kurtis Kraft-Offenhasuer
    1952 Troy Ruttman (USA) Kuzma-Offenhauser
    1953 Bill Vukovich (USA) Kurtis Kraft-Offenhauser
    1954 Bill Vukovich (USA) Kurtis Kraft-Offenhauser
    1955 Joie Ray (USA) Mercedes W196 (1)
    1956 Peter Collins (GBR) Ferrari
    1957 Jim Rathmann (USA) Watson-Offenhauser
    1958 A.J. Foyt (USA) Watson-Offenhauser
    1959 Stirling Moss (GBR) Cooper Climax Indy Special
    1960 Jim Rathmann (GBR) Watson-Offenhauser (2)
    1961 Phil Hill (USA) Ferrari
    1962 Rodger Ward (USA) Watson Climax-Offenhauser
    1963 Eddie Sachs (USA) Watson Climax-Offenhauser
    1964 A.J. Foyt (USA) Watson Climax-Offenhauser
    1965 Jim Clark (SCT) Lotus-Ford (3)
    1966 Jim Clark (SCT) Lotus-Ford
    1967 Lloyd Ruby (USA) Watson Climax-Ford
    1968 Jackie Stewart (SCT) Lotus-STP Turbine
    1969 Mario Andretti (USA) Lola-Ford
    1970 Dan Gurney (USA) AAR Eagle-Shelby
    1971 Mark Donahue (USA) Penske McLaren-Cosworth
    1972 Swede Savage (USA) Lola-Cosworth
    1973 Mark Donahue (USA) Penske McLaren-Cosworth
    1974 Johnny Rutherford (USA) McLaren-Cosworth
    1975 A.J. Foyt (USA) Coyote-Cosworth
    1976 Al Unser (USA) Penske-Cosworth
    1977 A.J. Foyt (USA) Coyote/Lotus-Cosworth
    1978 Tom Sneva (USA) Penske-Coworth
    1979 Danny Ongais (USA) Penske-Porsche (4)
    1980 Tim Richmond (USA) Chapparal-Cosworth (5)
    1981 Mario Andretti (USA) Wildcat-Cosworth
    1982 Rick Mears (USA) Penske-Cosworth
    1983 Mike Mosley (USA) Lightning-Buick
    1984 Gary Bettenhausen (USA) Lightning-Buick
    1985 Mario Andretti (USA) Lola-Cosworth
    1986 Bobby Rahal (USA) Lola-Cosworth (6)
    1987 Bobby Rahal (USA) Ferrari 87I (7)
    1988 Mario Andretti (USA) Lola-Chevrolet
    1989 Al Unser Jr. (USA) Lola-Chevrolet
    1990 Danny Sullivan (USA) Ferrari 87I
    1991 Willy T. Ribbs (USA) WalkerSport-Porsche 971 (8)
    1992 A.J. Foyt (USA) Coyote-Ford/Cosworth (8)
    1993 Nigel Mansell (USA) Lola-Ford Cosworth
    1994 Emerson Fittipaldi (BRA) Penske-Mercedes
    1995 Jacques Villenueve (CAN) Ferrari (9)
    1996 Scott Goodyear (CAN) Lola-Honda (10)
    1997 Ayrton Senna (BRA) Fittipaldi Penske-Mercedes (11)
    1998 Alex Zanardi (ITA) Ferrari (12)
    1999 Mika Salo (FIN) Target Ganassi Lola-Honda (13)
    2000 Tony Stewart (USA) Foyt Coyote-Chevrolet (14)
    2001 Ayrton Senna (BRA) Penske-Chevrolet
    2002 Gil de Ferran (BRA) Penske-Chevrolet
    2003 Michael Andretti (USA) Lola-Ford/Cosworth
    2004 Tony Kanaan (BRA) Andretti Lola-Ford/Cosworth
    2005 Tony Stewart (USA) Foyt Coyote-Chevrolet
    2006 Sam Hornish Jr. (USA) Penske-Honda
    2007 Helio Castroneves (BRA) Penske-Honda
    2008 Danica Patrick (USA) Andretti Lola-Ford (15)
    2009 Helio Castroneves (BRA) Penske-Honda
    2010 Tony Stewart (USA) Stewart Hoosier Coyote-Chevrolet
    2011 Ana Beatriz (BRA) Foyt Coyote-Chevrolet (16)

    (1) Joie Ray, driving the "Spirit of Crispus Attucks High School Special, " put up a cinderella victory and became the first African-American Driver to win the Indianapolis 500, ending a long road for a champion in American Automobile Association's lower divisions. He tried to qualify for the race every year since 1949, and each time because of the regulations barring black drivers from attempting to qualify for a "big car" series event, although Ray was a very competitive driver. In 1953, those rules were stricken and Ray qualified for his first 500. In 1954, he finished 13th, but caught the eye of a Mercedes team looking to return to the 500 as a factory team. The win by Ray was a big win for Mercedes, who was having a banner year in Motorsports. Ray would start 10 more 500s, and finish in the top 10 6 times. After hanging up his helmet for good, worked with Carroll Shelby as a mechanic. Ray was a part the development team that built Dan Gurney's Shelby-powered AAR Eagle that won the 1967 Formula 1 World Championship. In 1974, Ray opened a racing school in California. One of his first student was a brash young black kid named Willy T. Ribbs, who ended up being the second African-American to start and Indianapolis 500, and in 1991 followed in Ray's footsteps by winning the 500 Mile Race.

    (2) Jim Rathmann died earlier this week at age 83. His 1960 Indianapolis 500 was the last hurrah for the front-engined Indy Roadster.

    (3) Scotland's Jim Clark did a triple crown. Winning the Indianapolis 500, the Formula 1 World Championship, and winning a NASCAR Grand National Event at Fonda, New York.

    (4) Danny Ongais, "The Flying Hawaiian" dominated the 1979 race driving a Penske powered by a special Porsche-built pure racing pushrod engine. He was so dominant, that USAC changed the rule to basically eliminate it in 1980

    (5) An early season crash at Trenton put Johnny Rutherford on the sidelines for the Month of May, so Jim Hall rolled the dice rookie driver Tim Richmond of Ashland, Ohio. Richmond shocked the racing world by putting Hall's groundbreaker Chapparal on the pole and then leading 164 of 200 laps in a stunning victory. And that began a career for one of the wildest, throwback run and fun drivers of our era, who won races in IndyCars, NASCAR, Formula 1 and Endurance racing. Today Tim Richmond is still on the loose sort of. He's an outspoken racing commentator for Speed, but he's also made some marked changes in his life. He's a husband, father and could be 2012's biggest reality TV star, too.

    A movie on his life and career, "Go To Bed With A Winner" starring Matthew McConaughey as Tim Richmond, will open in theaters July 3, 2012. But if you want to know more about the Tim Richmond you may not know about, check out the "NASCAR Cup Series Champions" section :)


    (6) Bobby Rahal wins his first Indianapolis 500, but it was bittersweet because of the loss of his team owner and mentor Jim Trueman to cancer 14 days later. The IndyCar championship trophy is now named the Jim Trueman Cup, after one of the greatest friends to American Open Wheel Racing.

    (7) After Jim Trueman's death in 1986, Trueman left ownership of TrueSports to Bobby Rahal. An interested Enzo Ferrari looking to return to Indianapolis, offered to make TrueSports Ferrari's factory IndyCar team. Rahal repaid the trust of Il Commendatore by winning the 1987 Indy 500. Rahal drove for Ferrari through his retirement in 1992. Bobby Rahal returned to Ferrari in 1995, to be the team principal of the newly-formed Ferrari North American Racing Team. Rahal is the director of all Ferrari Motorsports in North America and is an member of the Board of Directors of FIAT.

    (8) After 3 years of mediocre results in IndyCar racing. Porsche Indy Racing team boss Derek Walker took a chance on 5-time Trans Am Champion Willy T. Ribbs, who had limited IndyCar success. His effort was repaid with an Indy win as part of a 5-win season where Ribbs finished 2nd in the CART PPG IndyCar Series to Bobby Rahal. Ribbs became the second African-American to win the 500. Today Ribbs and partners Max Siegel and Jay-Z run Rocafella Revolution Racing, a development team designed to get up and coming minority talent in racing. One of his drivers, Marc Davis won the British Formula Three Championship in 2009, and Finished 3rd in GP2 In 2010 and 2011. Davis will graduate to Formula 1 this season for Force India.

    (9) Jacques Villenueve was immediately hired by Bobby Rahal after Rahal was put in charge of Ferrari's IndyCar team. Villenueve won 10 races that season to dominate the IndyCar championship. 1995 is also important because of the what didn't happen. A push to form a new all-oval IndyCar series by Indianapolis Motor Speedway Tony George was thankfully headed off thanks to the urging of Jacques' father Gilles and Mario Andretti, who brokered peace between the feuding factions within the sport.

    (10) Scott Goodyear won the 500 in the closest 3-way finish in Speedway history, nosing out Al Unser Jr and Jimmy Vasser at the line to win.

    (11) Ayrton Senna's first run at the track, and the great Brazilian champion wins. All of Senna's prize money went to charities in Brazil.

    (12) Alex Zanardi leads a dominant Ferrari 1-2 with Jacques Villenueve. Zanardi went on to win IndyCar Series championships in 1997 and 1999 before moving to Formula 1 in 2000, where he won the Formula 1 Championship in 2001, 2003 and 2005.

    (13) Mika Salo stepped out of the shadow of being "The Other Mika" with an epic comeback win in 1999 where he passed Eddie Cheever down the final straightaway to win. Salo went on to win 19 IndyCar races before retiring in 2007. Today Salo is a partner in Suomi Sports Management with fellow Finnish racing star Keke Rosberg, and his overseeing the racing career of his son Max, who is an up and coming rally driver.

    (14) Tony Stewart has won in everything you can imagine, just like his mentor and friend A.J. Foyt. Stewart has three Indy 500 wins, his most recent coming in 2010 as a driver owner. He also has 5 Series Championships (2001, 2002, 2005, 2007 and 2011).He also has 6 USAC Sprint, Midget and Silver Crown titles to his name. He also owns his own IndyCar team, A World Of Outlaws Team and is currently working on the construction of the Tony Stewart Speedbowl near his hometown of Rushville, Indiana.

    (15) Danica Patrick's breakthrough in 2008 was an end and a beginning for a determined female who has shown talent and promise all the way up the ladder. In 2009 Patrick won the IndyCar Series championship and nearly snuck up on Tony Stewart in a late season charge in 2011. This season, she will achieve a personal dream by moving to Formula 1, where she was take the second seat at Team Stewart/Tyrrell.

    (16) Ana Beatriz's spunk and spirit was the exclamation point on a wild 2011 Indianapolis 500 that broke records for lead changes, breath taking moments and a frantic finish that saw 4 passes for the lead in the final lap. Beatriz dive underneath J.R. Hildebrand in turn four was the last pass and the winning pass. What makes Beatriz's win even more special was that it was 8th Indy 500 victory for the legendary A.J. Foyt as an owner and driver.
     
    Last edited: Dec 10, 2011
  14. Scott_B Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 22, 2009
    Location:
    Edinburgh
    Hmmm think some clarification on a few things are needed here. Also I think some butterflies would take issue with some of the modern ones being the same.

    Mclaren. Where did they go? You have Ron Dennis' Project 4 going into Tyrrell, why? Project 4 got together with Mclaren because they were both sponsored by Marlboro. I really can't see a fiercely independent leader like Ken Tyrrell letting Ron Dennis takeover, nor can I see Ron working under someone of such a different style to himself.

    Then presumably this Tyrrell team gets taken over by Jackie Stewart, suggesting Ron is gone by the late 90's, yet you have Lewis Hamilton turning up on schedule. His early career was very much driven by Mclaren. No Ron / Mclaren and Lewis may not be as good, or may never have had the cash to make it that far. Stewart had their own driver programmes.

    How does Prodrive get a team? In OTL they only considered having one if it had been legal to buy a Mclaren car lock stock and barrel.

    Ferrari don't seem successful enough to me, any reason?

    Can just about see Jordan managing to keep Schumacher longer than they did, but they simply didn't have the budget or the people to be producing title winning cars that early, unless Merc turned up earlier and produced decent engines much sooner than OTL, perhaps taking a stake in the team. Did Schumacher in this TL keep his links to Mercedes?

    Also, no Red Bull I presume? Again as with Hamilton, there's no guarantee Vettel turns up either.

    As much as I like the guy, Zanardi was never good enough to be a champion in F1, and Jeff Gordon? Has he ever even done any open wheel racing?
     
  15. Bedhead Member

    Joined:
    Oct 16, 2011
    Location:
    Belfast
    On reading this thread, I have the strange vision of Ayton Senna driving the Popemobile flat out with the Pontiff hanging on for dear life!:D:D:D

    I'd disagree with Hunt winning in 75 and Lombardi in 79, in 75 the Hesketh still wasn't good enough, Hunt flattered the car immensely but in reality it was pretty average, also Hesketh ran out of cash, it probably could have found commercial sponsorship, but "Le Patron" wouldn't allow it, which is a massive shame.

    I would definitely give Hunt more than one WDC, especially in the turbo era. I could see him driving for Renault, he was well educated and seemed to get along with most of the French drivers and had that certain arrogance and refinement that the French seem to love.:)
     
  16. Chipperback The World Is Coming to Kansas City 2016

    Joined:
    Jun 22, 2011
    Location:
    Hartford, Connecticut UCNE/Omaha, Nebraska GPUR
    Okay...Bedhead...I'm always up to make changes...where would Hunt land...what year would he win if not with Lord Alexander..

    Oh, and could he leave the women alone?:D

    Have a good idea for a change?...I'm all for it..and I'll change it, if its good. I already did once :)
     
  17. Chipperback The World Is Coming to Kansas City 2016

    Joined:
    Jun 22, 2011
    Location:
    Hartford, Connecticut UCNE/Omaha, Nebraska GPUR
    Where did all these butterflies come from?

    Hello Scott! Let's net some of those butterflies! :)



    McLaren became more of a constructor along the lines of March Engineering in OTL. The three of the men who would have created March, Alan Rees, Graham Coker and Robin Herd, all eventually would find their way to McLaren. March was never formed.

    The fourth, Max Mosley, met Bernie Eccelstone at a meeting of interested parties among the teams at the end of the 1969 season. Mosley became Eccelstone's legal man, just like he did in OTL.



    By the late 70s McLaren was looking at being more of an automotive technology consultant firm and a customer builder than a forming a full-on race team. Seeing this, Ron Dennis' Project 4 needed a place to become a team and compete, and Ken Tyrrell needed a title sponsor.

    Ron Dennis and Ken Tyrrell were a marriage of convenience.



    On the Tyrrell side of the ledger, Uncle Ken is independent but he's also a pragmatist. Blue cars with just Tyrrell on them and Elf stickers getting smaller every year weren't going to get it done. Ron Dennis brought a sack of pounds with him. However this was not a takeover, but and equal partnership.

    Or at least the legal agreements drawn out by each man's solictors said so.

    On Ron Dennis' side, Tyrrell has a good organization on the ground that can be assimilated into. Since McLaren's intrests were more diversified towards the customer/development role and with an eye towards more on the manufacturing end, Dennis needed take his ball to a new pitch.

    The big variable is the FISA-FOCA War.

    In OTL, FISA vs. FOCA was a lot of threats and one split event and a short driver's strike, but it was also more sound and fury signifying nothing,

    But ITTL, Bernie Eccelstone and Max Mosley had a situation where they were able to drum up an greater wave of driver and popular support. The Grand Prix Drivers Association, under the leadership of Francois Cervert was more organized and wielded more power than in the OTL. The Drivers were pushing from an agreement regarding "Rights and Conduct" andEccelstone played upon this.

    What also helped Eccelstone position is a key divergence. Colin Chapman, the head of Lotus, sighting the technical changes FOCA wanted to make (limits on aerodynamics skirts, greater parity between volume manufacturers and race constructors), siding with FISA on a number of matters (a quid pro quo to curry favor with Renault to receive turbo power it was later found out). McLaren also expressed sympathy with Jean-Marie Balestre's point of view. Mainly because of the growing relationships between McLaren and the larger automakers it was consulting with.

    The result, Eccelstone and Mosley called in a lot markers. Track owners were running to their contracts to see what the hell was going on..It was a mess...And it would be a mess for the next three years.

    Ultimately after a furious amount of court actions across the European Economic Community and a few in North America in 1979 and 1980, which delayed the start of 1980 season by 70 days. It was decided that each track could make a choice. They could not hold a race. They could choose one of governing bodies...OR both of them. In short...figure it out.

    FISA held two huge markers -- Monaco...and in 1980, FISA rearranged the calendar to brig traditionalist fans to their side. The season opened at Monte Carlo, and actually got a solid field of 16 teams...including a number of smaller teams that were giving immediate approval.
    They also had MONZA. Two of the glamour spots in F1, both firmly in FISAs series.

    FOCA however held a marker, too. Formula 1's "ancestral home" -- The United Kingdom. Officials at Silverstone and Brands Hatch made their feelings known quickly..FOCA Formula 1 series ONLY! Plus, they worked to leverage as many races outside of Britain as possible. FOCA got a major coup by both Watkins Glen and Long Beach signing with FOCA. For both tracks it proved to be a boon.

    FISA had the tracks, some big names and the glamour, but Jean-Marie weakness as far as the marketing showed up in a fantastic way. And drivers such as Gilles Villenueve and Francois Cervert continually pointed that our.

    FOCA had a bevy of telegenic stars and had friends in high places. Eccelstone found warm support from a nationalistic Westminster that saw FISA as "More bloody European interference hindering Britain."

    In 1982, FOCA got the linchpin ally that brought both sides to the table. Former world champion-turned-industrialist Dan Gurney, who was finalizing negotiations to acquire a good deal of the British auto industry offered to mediate, citing his 1978 "white paper" that restructured Indianapolis-type racing in the U.S. as a template.

    To make the long story short, three years of splits negotiations, and name calling nearly wrecked Formula 1, but ended up making Bernie Eccelstone a bigger player than he was in the OTL (and would also sow the seed of his downfall..buts that's different story).

    On December 5, 1982, the Eccelstone-Balestre Agreement (ITTL's "Concorde Agreement") was signed and ratified by all the competing teams for the 1983 season. 1983 would be a common schedule, and ultimately would be the compromises that would shape Formula 1 for the next 20 years. As I write this the next Eccelstone-Balestre Agreement is in primary discussions. All sides are very optimistic that the team principals and FOA Chairman Damon Hill and his negotiating team will be ready to annouce a new agreement at New Kylami next March.



    Actually Ferrari was more competitive ITTL, but so was all of Formula 1. A lot of small teams were buying McLaren M23 kits, not March 731 kits, and winning with them.

    Ferrari did walk out of the decade with 3 Constructors Championship and 2 drivers, also Jacky Ickx won more races in ITTL, then he did in OTL, in part because he sacrificed a bit of his endurance career to drive the hell out of early 1970s Ferrari F1 cars that weren't very good but he was winning with them. Similar to the OTL, Niki Lauda was very competitive in the next generation 312T mounts in 1975 and 1976 and 1977 (narrowly losing to Hunt in '75, dethroning Hunt in '76 narrowly losing to A.J. Foyt in '77 -- and that is another variable..the F1 talent level was above the level OTL)

    Also another thing to consider: No Jody Scheckter (OTL '79 World Champion for Ferrari), and you can thank Francois Cevert for that.

    South Africa was banned from FIA motorsports championships in a similar fashion to how the nation was banned from International rugby. That ban began in 1976, and the ban went one step further. A native-born South Africa could emigrate to Britain, but he won't Zola Budd his or her way (sorry Desire Wilson) to a FISA license. Scheckter tried to do that. But don't feel too sad for Jody. He had a very good career in IndyCar and now he and he son Tomas are preparing to make their debut in Formula 1 as the proud owners of Team Springbok Grand Prix. Coming to a GP near you in '12

    Ferrari in the 1980s won two drivers championships ITTL, that's two more than Ferrari did in the OTL 1980s. Granted one of those was in the FISA split season, but every racing pundit and expert agreed that Gilles Villenueve would have rolled to a championship if the 1982 season was a united F1 season.

    Ferrari's success in the late 80s came more in IndyCar racing in the United States, and that may have hurt Ferrari in the 1990s. Also consider, No Michael Schumacher in Maranello

    Mercedes kept their golden boy and in turn dumped a lot of their resources on Eddie Jordan, the result?...Eddie Jordan's team wasn't underfunded but plucky. They were plucky, fun and full of Deutschmarks, and they spent well. Plus Mercedes was technically ready, because of another key point Mercedes Benz never left motorsports They did draw down committment in the 1960s to focus more on cars people buy and on racing related to cars people buy. But Mercedes still kept an ear to racing, and they worked on racing projects as a subcontractor, but they got a push in the late 1970s by the immense success they were seeing from Porsche and Audi. M-B didn't want to get left behind, so they dove back into it hard ITTL 1984, and by 1988, there were among the front of the grid in endurance racing and well on the way in lower single seaters.
    They also developed a young pipeline of German talent. ITTL, Mercedes was pushing to build a German World Champion, and they had a promising set of brothers called Michael and Ralf.

    It was Michael Schumacher who was the golden child and when he went to Jordan, Mercedes went with him with a ready V-10 package designed and built by Penske-Ilmor.



    Put Zanardi in a competitive Grand Prix car, and Michael Schumacher would get scared in a hurry. Alessandro Zanardi had the balls and the touch to win. Regardless of your talent level you have to have good equipment, and even Frank Williams admitted, the Williams Zanardi drove for him in OTL wasn't up to scratch.

    Zanardi with Ross Brawn at Ferrari circa 2001? On quite a few Sunday afternoons the question would be, "Who's finishing second behind Alex Zanardi?"

    Since I've written into the 1990s anyway, I'll explain how Jackie Stewart owns a team, Jeff Gordon is a champion, AND how Lewis Hamilton got here. All three of these events are connected.

    First Ken Tyrrell and Ron Dennis had a good run. They won the last Jim Clark Cup as FOCA Champs in 1982 thanks to Tiff Needell, who had a very solid career with 12 career wins and 3 LeMans victories. He stills races from time to time, but you see him very often on your telly. He has a very successful chat show on Channel Five. Think of a really hyper and comedic cross between Jeremy Paxman and Peter Snow, and you'll get an idea of who the ITTL's Tiff Needell is.

    Tyrrell Project Four won in '85 Keke Rosberg who said that dealing with Ron Dennis was biggest mess he dealt with in his life, and he escaped to NASCAR because it was so bad. In 1987 Nigel Mansell took home the world championship, but also left because he just didn't like Ron Dennis...but then again, who did Nigel like?

    The Dennis-Tyrrell relationship couldn't last on pragmatism forever, plus Tyrrell was looking to get out of Formula 1 and retire by the 1990s, but he didn't want to leave his team in hands of the who he nicknamed "Ron Dennis Oswald Mosley"

    Enter Jackie Stewart. His son Paul was owning and racing in British Formula Three. Also enter Jackie's good friend George Harrison, who was an avid racing fan and wanted to invest in Formula 1. It seems he had some spare Beatles money that doing nothing.

    Stewart was putting together the contacts to built his own F1 team. Ken Tyrrell tried to talk him out of it, but Stewart wanted to press on. Tyrrell was beginning discussion of selling his interest in the team to Stewart.

    When Ron Dennis got wind of it, he moved quickly to try and force a takeover of the team. What ensued was over two years of court fights that hurt the team on track, but In 1994 and deal was struck.

    Ron Dennis was paid to leave. Jackie Stewart was majority owner of the team, and Ken Tyrrell retired.
    Out of respect and love for the man who gave him his start, the team was renamed Stewart/Tyrrell Grand Prix Engineering.

    As all this was going on in Britain, there was young kid who moved from his home in California to Indiana around 1989, to be closer to the USAC racing scene. The young lad had Indianapolis dreams and a lot of talent . By 1991, Jeff Gordon was dominating on dirt and asphalt, and Ford Motor Company had him under a development contract.

    The question is? Where do we put him. There aren't many good open seats in IndyCar. Ford racing in 1990s limited their technology to a few teams. They stressed quality over quantity. They didn't nor want the entire field in Ford-Cosworths or 25-30 NASCAR Thunderbirds in the field.

    Jeff Gordon, even with a lot of talent, couldn't get in the door.

    Ford was pointing him toward NASCAR, and he did compete in the 1992 NASCAR Busch (now Nationwide) Series, but again, it was the same deal. None of the frontline Ford teams where willing to take a chance on the rookie, even one with Gordon's talent.
    One of NASCAR maverick owners put an offer onthe table. Rick Hendrick wanted to sign the kid to drive for an expanded team in 1993. Ford officials were scared. They'd lose a special talent to their biggest rival, Chevrolet.

    In OTL Stewart made it public that he was looking at Gordon around 1991 to consider having his son's team campaign him in British Formula Three. Gordon turned him down. He wanted to stay in the states.

    ITTL, Jackie Stewart made the offer and Gordon jumped on it. Driving for Paul Stewart Racing, he was a solid 4th place in the standings in the British Formula Three Series in 1993. In 1994, he moved up to F3000 and was 3rd in in the standings with 4 series victory. Gordon also did an impressive set of tests with the new Stewart/Tyrrell in 1994.

    The stage was set for Stewart/Tyrrell Grand Prix '95.
    The drivers were veteran Brazillian Rubens Barrichello ,and American rookie Jeff Gordon.

    However, before Gordon began his Formula 1 journey, Ford had an idea to get some buzz for him in America. They entered Jeff Gordon in 1995 Daytona 500, driving a third entry for the successful Yates-Kulwicki-Allison Racing Team. YKA was leading a period of Ford dominance in NASCAR, and Jeff Gordon added his name to it.

    Gordon won his Twin 125-mile qualifying heat and started 3rd in the grid. On race day, Gordon led 127 laps and passed Sterling Marlin on the final lap to win the 1995 Daytona 500.
    The next week Gordon was participating in the final F1 Preseason test at Estoril, Portugal, and there was a lot of buzz generated.

    At first, at lot of European fans looked down their nose on the American, and his pedigree on dusty backwater dirt tracks.

    But people who knew racing and knew history saw the stuff of past American grand prix stars in Jeff Gordon.



    Gordon learned quickly in 1995 and 1996, and it came together 1997. The Stewart/Tyrrell-Ford package was close to the level of the dominant Jordan package and ahead of the Ferrari, Williams and Prost EuroFrance teams.

    Jeff Gordon and Michael Schumacher waged a pitched confrontation around the world, that ended with Schumacher trying to crash him in the season's final race at the 1997 European Grand Prix. Gordon fought off Schumacher and won the championship. It was a victory not just for Gordon or Stewart or Ford, but it was another sign that the growing push to develop talent that was fostered by Mercedes works. Ford put more into their driver development programmes as a result.

    And the Ford development program in the UK, got news of a special kid in Stevenhage around the time Jeff Gordon was starting out.

    As Jeff Gordon rose, so did this young British kid, and the youngster became a fan of the rookie from America.
    They met at a karting award banquet where Jackie was presenting in 1995. The confident ten-year-old introduced himself...

    "Hi, I'm Lewis Hamilton...and I want to drive for you someday Mr. Stewart and want to be your teammate, Mr. Gordon."

    When Gordon clinched the 1997 championship, this kid was watching on BBC 1, hearing Murray Walker sing his praises. (ITTL The Beeb never lost the Television Contract)




    Jackie Stewart never forgot the kid and neither did Jeff Gordon. In 1998, Ford Motor Company and small investment firm called Gordon-Evernham Enterprises starting giving technical and financial support to a young, black kid in Stevenhage with dreams of hope and glory.

    The rest was history.

    At the season opening Australian Grand Prix in 2007, Jeff Gordon started in position #2 on the grid.

    Lewis Hamilton, Gordon's teammate, was on the pole position. :)



    1. David Richards didn't try to "cheat" ITTL. He pulled his rally people together, got together with some knowledgable F1 people trying to get Lotus F1 going again and in 1999 started working on designs from an F1 project.

    2. Find somebody with deep pockets and big ambitions....Deep pockets? Big Ambitions? It seems the people who own Lotus have those things.

    The next thing you know, David Richards is at a corporate office in Kuala Lumpur.

    Deep pocket and big ambition, thy name is "Proton".

    British know-how+ Malaysian money=what BAR could have been :)
    Prodrive was on the grid in 2002 and was surprisingly solid. In 2004, the had become much like OTL Brawn GP, thanks to a lot of rules uncertainty. Richards' team found the loopholes and ProDrive-Proton found it had a competitive advantage.

    This is why Damon Hill wants the next Eccelstone-Balestre Agreement to be air tight. The big teams hate loopholes. That hasn't stopped Prodrive Lotus-Proton from being competitive, but they are still straining to find someone that can carry them back to the top.

    And what happened to Red Bull?
    ITTL, Red Bull put the PR dollars in rallying and X-games exclusively. They didn't think they'd get as a big a bang for their Euro in Formula 1.

    Sebastian Vettel would still get to F1, anyway. Danke Schon, Mercedes Benz.
    Vettel came through the Mercedes development program, and was their next golden boy. Michael Schumacher was one of the people who looked at him early on, and there are many more to come according to Schumacher, who now runs the Mercedes Driver Development Programme.

    He was pretty golden in 2010. He won 10 races enroute to a runway championship season that has Eddie Jordan very happy, but also has Ferrari, Tyrrell, Super Aguri, Prodrive Lotus...and everybody else in Formula 1 going back to the drawing boards.












     
    Last edited: Dec 4, 2011
  18. AdA Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    May 25, 2011
    Location:
    Portugal
    Chris Amon

    Ferrari is reliable from 68 and Amon wins the title, looses to Stewart in 69, but wins Back to back titles in 70 and 71.
     
  19. Stateless Well-Known Watermelon

    Joined:
    Dec 29, 2007
    Location:
    Who's asking?
    First off, nice to see an F1 timeline!

    One question is, how, with a POD of 1950 (presumably earlier), do you have quite so much convergence between OTL and TTL. While I appreciate the champions are different, the drivers winning world championships are the same people (presumably identical) to OTL. Strict butterflies should mean that champions from at least Tiff Needell onward won't be born, at least not as the same person they were OTL. But I can understand why you've been loose on it, so it's not a big issue.

    What I really want to ask is, why are there seemingly so few fatal accidents ITTL? In OTL a driver racing in the 50s, 60s and 70s stood a high chance of dying in a race, and Peter Collins, Wolfgang von Trips, Jochen Rindt and Piers Courage are just some of the famous names that lost their lives in Formula One in this period (by the way, if you haven't, watch the BBC4 documentary 'Grand Prix: The Killer Years' - just make sure you're feeling strong before you do, it gets me every time). Do these drivers still die, or do others die in their place? If so, who? If not, what effect does this have on the sport? Does F1 still have its black weekend in 1994 or an alt-equivalent? OTL, the fatalities have been instrumental in getting safety measures brought in. Would you see this ATL as being more or less safe than OTL?

    Look forward to hearing more from you.
     
  20. HesitatedEye Minister for Organised Chaos

    Joined:
    Oct 3, 2011
    Location:
    Sunny Scotland
    I love this

    I love this timeline especially Jordan F1 still around I take it Nigel didn't crash in Japan in 87 and beat Piquet. I am a huge Mansell fan so I'm kinda curious to know what happened between 87-93 Who did he go to? Did he win the Indy Car title in 93 etc.