Empires of Liberty

Discussion in 'Alternate History Discussion: Before 1900' started by JJohnson, Dec 21, 2012.

  1. JJohnson Well-Known Member

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    This is a timeline which I hope to finally carry into 2012 and beyond. I was partially inspired by a few timelines, such as the Dominion of Southern America, a few What-Ifs, and some of my past ideas. The hope is to keep as realistic as possible, and constructive feedback and helpful suggestions are welcome.

    I'm going to try posting this in a mixed format of a timeline along with 'historical articles' as if from a textbook, see if that works well.

    Timeline:
    1740: Admiral Vernon turns his ships towards Havana, instead of Cartagena de India; having coordinated with the governor of Jamaica, they send 30 ships to the Spanish city;
    1750: Treaty of Madrid: Spain cedes Cuba to the British permanently.
    1752: Patrick Murray becomes governor of Cuba.
    1760: Guy Carleton becomes third governor of Cuba.
    1762: Guy Carleton is transferred to governor of Puerto Rico
    1763: Guy Carleton serves as governor of Cuba until 1778.
    1763: James Murray serves as governor of the Province of Quebec, holding the post till 1774.





    I'll work on the US next.
     
    Last edited: Dec 23, 2012
  2. CaliBoy1990 Iconoclastic Liberal.

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    Sounds promising. Here's a tip for you, btw: if you really want to make your TL as plausible as can be(or a Type I on the TV Tropes plausibility scale), here's a hint regarding the U.S. for starters: Look at TLs like Eurofed's "U.S. of the Americas and Oceania" and DoD for examples of things NOT to do; or example, don't give the U.S. most or all of both continents by 1900 (as in the former), and don't let slavery expand too far beyond the traditional areas, or survive too far beyond, say, the middle third of the 19th Century or so, without a really, really, good explanation(this kinda happened in the latter TL), etc. And if you're going to cover corporations at any great length, you may wish to avoid the Sobelian route(that is, no superpowered corporate nation-states like FWoAN's Kramer Associates.) Just a couple of helpful examples for you. ;)
     
  3. JJohnson Well-Known Member

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    I will definitely not copy Eurofed's timeline; the United States in my opinion can't expand much past North America state-wise with its revolution staying roughly the same. At absolute best, it could absorb OTL Canada, the northern parts of Mexico, maybe a few more Caribbean and Pacific Islands, but I'd highly doubt anything on South America or Australia/New Zealand. Cultural similarities help, but the communications distance precludes it for the 19th to early 20th century, and by then, the South American / Australian cultures have already developed their own identities and they wouldn't want to join the USA. Slavery I abhor and I can't put it much past the first half of the 19th century anywhere.
     
  4. JJohnson Well-Known Member

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    1774: Nova Scotian patriot activity rises
    1776: Nova Scotia declares independence, its patriot-emboldened legislature moving to Moncton then Fredericton to escape the British during the war.
    1777: Seige of St John turns the popular tide for most of Nova Scotia to the patriot side for the duration of the war.
    1783: British troops withdraw from Halifax; Nova Scotia votes on a new State Constitution
    1784: Walter Patterson becomes the Speaker of the Nova Scotia Assembly, from St. John's Island, with Uniacke as Governor.
    1788: Nova Scotia ratifies the Constitution on January 9th, with 3/4 in favor.
    1796: the District of Maine and the state of Nova Scotia bring their border dispute to the Supreme Court; the states of Massachusetts and Nova Scotia are instructed to settle their differences in the definitions of St. Johns River, leading to a compromise, with Thomas Jefferson drawing the border at Steubenville (OTL St George), up the Magaguadavic River, to Lake Magaguadavic, then due north to the St John River, following that to its source.

     
  5. JJohnson Well-Known Member

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    List of US states in 1800:
    Delaware, Pennsylvania, New Jersey, Georgia, Connecticut, Nova Scotia, Massachusetts, Maryland, South Carolina, New Hampshire, Virgina, New York, North Carolina, Rhode Island, Vermont, Kentucky, Tennessee, Quebec.
     
  6. JJohnson Well-Known Member

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    By 1783, the United States had earned its freedom from the British Empire through much sacrifice, its patriots pledging their lives, their fortunes, and their sacred honor to one another.

    This United States, however, would be a different place, larger in some respects; the resultant United Kingdom would also be a different place. Having lost her colonies, and faced with the need to place her Loyalist subjects elsewhere, Britain's colonial aims turned towards settler colonies and profitable trade with them and her former colonies in America.

    The United Kingdom's remaining colonies: Cuba, British Honduras, British Guiana, Cayman Islands, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Barbados, Antigua, Barbuda, Montserrat, Anguilla, Jamaica, British Virgin Islands, Dominica, Trinidad and Tobago, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Grenada, Saint Lucia, Mosquito Coast, Falkland Islands, Rupert's Land, Newfoundland and Labrador, Australia, New Zealand; Manila, Bengal, Saint Helena.

    Per the Treaty of Paris, the United Kingdom regained Providencia Island, San Andrés, and Santa Catalina from Spain as a result of two successful raids, led from Kingsport, Cuba, in 1782. These islands would become part of British Honduras, along with the Bay Islands, which were not transferred to Honduras with the Mosquito Coast.
     
    Last edited: Dec 24, 2012
  7. JJohnson Well-Known Member

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    A brief jump to the Napoleonic Conflict before getting to the USA in earnest.
     
    Last edited: Dec 31, 2012
  8. JJohnson Well-Known Member

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    The Seven Years' War, as it was known in Europe had some minor effects within the Caribbean, mostly with privateers, but with the Royal Navy holding port at Kingsport, Cuba, the Spanish Empire would be unable to hold on to other islands within the Caribbean.

     
    Last edited: Dec 31, 2012
  9. JJohnson Well-Known Member

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    Independence

    The American Colonies declare independence from Great Britain in 1776 due to a number of "Intolerable Acts."

    Among these acts:
    *Boston Port Act - closed the Port of Boston until the British East India company was repaid
    *Massachusetts Government Act - most positions were to be appointed by the King.
    *Administration of Justice Act - allowed trials of royal officials to be moved to another colony or to Great Britain
    *Property Act - governors could confiscate private property without notice to public benefit; this was used in several colonies to give private homes to a favored company for increased tax revenue and kickbacks.
    *Quartering Act - allowed a governor to house soldiers in other buildings if suitable quarters were not provided, including private homes
    *Quebec Act - partly undid Governor James Murray's successful reforms; it made the upper legislative chamber appointed by the governor instead of elected as Murray had set it up, forbade French in government (the use of language could be set by the governor), eliminating French civil law and contracts written under it, setting a religious test on Catholics holding government posts, and extending Quebec into the Ohio Valley for settlement by Indians, not Quebeckers or Anglo-Americans. Frederick Haldimand utilized these powers, starting in 1773, spurring much Patriot sympathy in the once peaceful colony.


    The sentiment for redress of grievances was strong, while the whispers of independence had not yet gained rapid movement. Even Thomas Jefferson, a later President said:

    Believe me, dear Sir: there is not in the British empire a man who more cordially loves a union with Great Britain than I do. But, by the God that made me, I will cease to exist before I yield to a connection on such terms as the British Parliament propose; and in this, I think I speak the sentiments of America.
    —Thomas Jefferson, November 29, 1775

    A sentiment growing in the colonies since the French and Indian Wars, which had nearly bankrupted the British Government, was the view that Parliament's authority was not supreme. Since the colonies were not represented directly in Parliament, they had no authority to tax them. The orthodox British view since at least the Glorious Revolution of 1688 was that the Parliament was the supreme authority throughout the British Empire, and thus its acts were by definition constitutional. The colonists, however, had developed the idea that the British constitution recognized certain fundamental rights that no government, including the Parliament, could violate. The Intolerable Acts inflamed the growing sentiments against the king and Parliament, their calculated risk of trying to bring the colonies under their control backfiring miserably.

    Revolution Begins
    In April 1775 Gage learned that weapons were being gathered in Concord, and he sent British troops to seize and destroy them. Local militia confronted the troops and exchanged fire, marking the battles of Lexington and Concord. On April 19, 1775, Patriot militia and the King's troops engaged at Concord.

    About 700 British Army regulars, under Lieutenant Colonel Francis Smith, were given secret orders to capture and destroy military supplies that were reportedly stored by the Massachusetts militia at Concord. Through effective intelligence gathering, Patriot colonials had received word weeks before the expedition that their supplies might be at risk and had moved most of them to other locations. They also received details about British plans on the night before the battle and were able to rapidly notify the area militias of the enemy movement.

    The first shots were fired just as the sun was rising at Lexington. The militia were outnumbered and fell back, and the regulars proceeded on to Concord, where they searched for the supplies. At the North Bridge in Concord, approximately 500 militiamen fought and defeated three companies of the King's troops. The outnumbered regulars fell back from the minutemen after a pitched battle in open territory.

    More militia arrives soon after and inflicted heavy damage on the regulars as they marched back to Boston. Brigadier General Hugh Percy's reinforcements rescued Smith's beleaguered expedition, bolstering their forces to around 1700 men. Even with that, they faced heavy fire on their way back to the safety of Charlestown. The accumulated militias blockaded the narrow land accesses to Charlestown and Boston, starting the Siege of Boston.

    After repeated pleas to the British monarchy for intervention with Parliament, any chance of a compromise ended when the Congress were declared traitors by royal decree, and they responded by declaring the independence of a new sovereign nation, the United States of America, on July 4, 1776. Colonial Loyalists rejected the Declaration, and sided with their king; they were excluded from power everywhere possible in the colonies. American attempts to expand the rebellion into the Floridas were unsuccessful, but the rebellion did reach Quebec, Nova Scotia, and eventually St. John's Island.

    In this Declaration, a number of signatories were found, including Denis Viger, Jean Baillairgé, and John Cushing Aylwin of Quebec. Language of the Declaration included such grievances as:

    "He has erected a multitude of New Offices, and sent hither swarms of Officers to harass our people and eat out their substance, and exempted these Officers from the same laws duly passed by the elected legislatures."
    "He has refused to allow citizens the right to speak the language of their birth and custom when conducting the most needful affairs of government and commerce."
    "He has altered our methods of government with the appointment of persons alien to our land and custom to our legislatures to prevent us from passing needful laws."
    "He has allowed his Officers to take the lawful Land and Property of Citizens to be given to his favored Persons for their enrichment and the enrichment of the Royal Treasury."

    War would be the only way to resolve the differences between cousins across the Atlantic.
     
    Last edited: Jan 4, 2013
  10. Darth_Kiryan The Númenorean Sith

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    I am liking the information and research you have provided me with reading.

    Is this going to be a giant Ameri-wank? As in, the US occupies the entire northern continent, or are you going to toe the line.
     
  11. JJohnson Well-Known Member

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    The US isn't getting everything it might want. Not to spoil the surprise, but Quebec won't be joining the US party right off the bat.
     
  12. JJohnson Well-Known Member

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    The American Revolution

    The fall of British North America.

     
    Last edited: Jan 9, 2013
  13. JJohnson Well-Known Member

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    British North America might fall, but that does not mean the end of the British Empire. What she loses, she will more than make up for!

     
  14. Unknown Member

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    Good updates so far.

    Can't wait for the next one.
     
  15. JJohnson Well-Known Member

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    The American Revolution continues.

     
  16. JJohnson Well-Known Member

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    From the World Factbook, NSA (c) 2010:

    Statue of James Cook, discoverer of New Caledonia, built 1948, celebrating the signing of the Statute of Westminster:
    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Mar 6, 2013
  17. JJohnson Well-Known Member

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    The last years of the American Revolution signal the end of the war in the American's favor, but the British Empire will soon turn elsewhere for settler colonies.

    "The Rise of the British Empire" details the beginnings of the Pax Britannica.

     
  18. FleetMac Patriotic Scalawag

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    You mentioned that Glen's DSA TL served as an influence on your style of timeline, and it shows (that's not a bad thing at all :)), and you seem to have done quite a bit of research and thought into this. Consider me subscribed
     
  19. CaliBoy1990 Iconoclastic Liberal.

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    That's neat, because DSA helped inspire one of my own TLs.....:)
     
  20. JJohnson Well-Known Member

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    Thank you! His style conveniently allows different perspectives on history from multiple points in time from multiple angles of the same event.