Ellie's all-purpose test thread (the sequel)

Discussion in 'Post Test Messages Here' started by Ellie, Dec 12, 2015.

?

Choose one option below:

  1. Option 1

    12.5%
  2. Option 1: Part 2

    8.3%
  3. Option 1: Part 2: Extended Version

    8.3%
  4. Option 1: Part 2: Extended Version (The HD Remake)

    8.3%
  5. Happiness and success

    37.5%
  6. Being lazy and watching Netflix for 10 hours straight

    20.8%
  7. Coffee...

    29.2%
  8. Sleeping

    29.2%
  9. Love

    25.0%
  10. Do NOT choose this option

    50.0%
  11. Cats, kittens, and everything feline

    37.5%
  12. I'm bored

    12.5%
  13. I've run out of ideas

    12.5%
  14. A nice glass of wine

    16.7%
  15. Chocolate everything

    25.0%
  16. ↑That option

    20.8%
  17. (null)

    16.7%
  18. What is this??

    8.3%
  19. Blaming Thande!

    25.0%
  20. Blaming Thande!

    12.5%
Multiple votes are allowed.
  1. Ellie Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 22, 2014
    Location:
    Ohio
    Got bored of my old test thread, so here's a new one. Mostly you'll find unfinished map game turns and Historiae Mutetur content.
     
  2. Ellie Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 22, 2014
    Location:
    Ohio
    Presidents of the Republic of Taiwan (later Republic of China) (1968-Present)

    Ma Yingjeou (Kuomintang) (2008-Present)
    Chen Shuibian (Democratic Progressive) (2000-2008)
    Yeh Xigui (Kuomintang) (1994-2000)
    Hu Shichan (Kuomintang) (1985-1994)
    Yen Chaikan (Kuomintang) (1977-1985)
    Tsou Dyun (Democratic Progressive) (1974-1977)
    Lin Deming (Democratic Socialist) (1968-1974)

    Governor-Generals of Taiwan (Taiwan under Japanese rule) (1861-1968)

    ...
    Den Kenjirō (1919-1923)
    ...

    Taiwanese Emperors (1450-1861)

    Chou Di Wei (1860-1861) [1]
    Ts'ai Di Jun (1851-1860) [2]
    Hsu Di Lan (1846-1851)
    ...
    Cin Di Lu (1815-1831) [3]
    ...
    Tam Di Waekeung (1519-1540) [1]
    Chou Di Le (1514-1519)
    Chun Wang Ui (1491-1514)
    Li Wang Cao (1466-1491)
    Han Di Lu (1450-1466)

    [1] Treaty of Nagoya (1861): Chinese vassal of Taiwan is ceded to Japan.
    [2] Treaty of Nankin (1858): Russian "cordial cooperation" with Taiwan and the Philippines is dissolved, and Taiwan becomes a Chinese vassal.
    [3] Permyakov-Hsieh Conference (1823): Taiwanese Empire gradually enters "cordial cooperation" with Holtzist Russia.
    [1] First Korean monarch of Taiwan.

    Highest Ministers of Tai-Pei (1402-1450)

    Han Lu (1438-1450) [1]
    Tak Huan (1432-1438)
    Seng Lui (1431-1432)
    Yuen Li (1425-1431)
    Xue Ji (1414-1425)
    Xiao Shi (1410-1414)
    Min Lu (1409-1410)
    Feng Shiji (1405-1410)
    Tam Suikao (1402-1405)

    [1] Negotiated with the leaders of Dai-Viet-Siam-Pagan to create the restored united Taiwanese state in 1450. As per the treaty he signed, he maintains Tai-Pei's (henceforth Taiwan's) elective monarchy. The city of Tai-Pei (also spelled Taipei) become's Taiwan's capital, as opposed to the Chen Dynasty's (post-exile) capital in Taichung.

    Emperors of China (Chen Dynasty) (????-1402)

    Kaihuang Emperor (1386-1402) [1]
    Junshi Emperor (1367-1386)
    Bowen Emperor (13??-1367) [2]

    [1] After his death, his state fractured, and the successor kingdoms fell into the orbit of the League of the Vermilion Bird.
    [2] Overthrown after the loss of the mainland to the Song scholars.
     
    Last edited: Dec 12, 2015
  3. Ellie Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 22, 2014
    Location:
    Ohio
    My origins of U.S. cities in Historiae Mutetur. After a five-month hiatus, I think it's time to get back to work.


    Alabama

    Birmingham - Established from the ashes of an Absarook camp as "Sequoyah's City" in 1554, it became the new capital of the Cherokee Empire. Throughout the centuries, it remained the most important city of the Cherokee (bar the original villages of the "homeland" of the Lower Appalachians) all the way to the resizing of the Cherokee Republic in 1882. After the defeat of the RCR, the Cherokee population of the city was virtually completely deported by Spanish-Georgian forces, and the vacant labor was replaced by cheap and work-hungry immigrants from up north, particularly from Appalachia, Ohio, and Pennsylvania. These immigrants made the city, then called La Magia, their home, and with their help the city of Birmingham became the industrial capital of the south. As such, it became an important city of Louisiana in the early 1900's, and this status was inherited by Alabama in 1991. The city's nicknames, "The Magic City" and "Pittsburgh of the South", refer to important aspects of its history. The former refers to the Georgian control (when the city saw its biggest expansion), and the latter refers to the influence of the influx of immigrants from the North.

    Huntsville - This city was founded in the Vespuccian state of Atsun'sta Ti in 1831 as ᎾᎥᏂᎨᏗᎦᏚᏏ ("Village near the Hills"), it immediately attracted white settlers and slave owners. By 1845, the city was almost entirely white, and upon his being elected as mayor, John Hunt renamed the town in his own honor as Huntsville. The name stuck through thick and thin, even during the RCR's eviction of the white elite in the 1880's and 1890's and the later French occupation. In the United States, it is an important center for aerospace engineering and design.

    Mobile - Founded in 1586 as Mobilus, it became the capital of the newly-founded New Thessalia of the Southern Roman Empire following the Choctaw Offensive. It remained the most important port city of the colony and its successor, Pensacola (both as a Vespuccian state and an independent republic). In 1848, the small republic joined Gran Colombia as the city of Mobile, though the region (and thus Mobile) were largely ignored. When the Northern League/Georgians acquired the region in 1882, the city of Mobile saw a surge of ship traffic, though under French rule (1917-1960) the city of Nouvelle-Orléans remained Louisiana's principal port city. With the fall of French rule (1960) and the admission of Alabama to the Union (1992), Mobile remained a principal city along the Gulf of Mexico.

    Montgomery - Cherokee settlers founded this as the settlement of ᎠᏂᏟᏏᏍᎬ (Anitlisis'gv - "Gathering") in 1676. It remained a small and rather unimportant village until the arrival of the Georgians in 1882, who transformed the Cherokee village into the town of San Fermin. With the arrival of the French from Louisiana in 1917, the city was renamed Montgomery and became the capital of Louisianan Mississippi until its dissolution in 1960. When Alabama joined the Union in 1991, it became the state's capital, though it is not the largest city in that state (that record goes to Birmingham).

    Alaska

    Anchorage - Though the land had been explored by the Scandinavians, the city itself was founded by the Japanese in 1865 as 白街, or Shiromachi ("The White City"). The city quickly grew to become the Japanese Empire's major stopping point between continents, as materials and people frequently traveled there during trips from the more densely-populated "Rain Coast" to the Japanese Isles. Shiromachi, despite not being the capital of Aliasca, remained the colony's most important city, even after its acquisition by the rising United States of America in 1970. Hoping to erase the remnants of Japanese culture, the city was renamed "Anchorage" as it was seen as a great place for American ships and people to anchor and expand inland. It remains Alaska's largest city to the present day, by far.

    Fairbanks - Founded in 1902 as うねり小川, or Uneri-ogawa ("The Swell Banks"), by Japanese gold prospectors. Being almost exclusively a mining town, it had a very limited economy and was generally ignored by passerbys. When the United States acquired Aliasca in 1970, the name of the city was directly translated to Fairbanks, and it became the hub of interior Alaska. However, unlike the pristine Anchorage, Fairbanks shows a few signs of pollution...

    Arizona

    Phoenix - This city is the descendant of the Aztec city of Xīpetotēc, named after an Aztec life-death-rebirth diety. It was established in 1857 by settlers travelling to Aztlan, and immediately attracted a large population. In accordance with the First Peoples' Confederation's practice of giving benefits to incoming easterners, the Aztecs provided workers' compensation and other benefits for employed eastern immigrants. Thus, many moved to Xīpetotēc. As one of the measured done by the Aztec government to westernize the empire, the city was renamed "Phoenix" (maintaining the rebirth motif) as a way to show a more Euro-American appeal.

    Tuscon - This city is the descendant of the ancient Aztec border city of Xantico, named after the goddess who protected precious things. As a well-fortified border city for many years, the city was very aptly named, responsible for holding off attacks by the Absarook, Hohokam, Portuguese, and Californians. With the expansion into Aztlan in the mid 19th century, Xantico was no longer a border city, though it still attracted many Euro-American settlers, eventually being renamed "Tucson" by Castilian-Californian landowners during the Aztec Reform.

    Arkansas

    Little Rock - From its 1788 establishment by Francophone Vespuccians to its existence under Louisiana, it was known as Ville de la Rochelle. During the Vespuccian Era, it was often nicknamed La Passerelle à l'Ouest, or "The Gateway to the West". Under Louisiana, though, the cities of Nouvelle-Orléans and (especially) Saint Louis took this title from Ville de la Rochelle, also simply called La Rochelle or VR. The name of the city would only be changed to Little Rock upon the United States' victory against Louisiana in 1977.

    Kentucky

    Louisville - Like many of the cities of the lands originally explored by the Dutch (after the Native Americans, that is), this city has its roots in German-Dutch culture. The city was originally founded as Lodewijkstad, named after its founder, Lodewijk van Bergen, in 1700. After the Dutch defeat in the Vespuccian Revolution, many cities in the nation changed their names from the Dutch to the German versions, so Lodewijkstad became Ludwigstadt sometime in the 1720's or 1730's. During this time, Ludwigstadt became a significant trading center along the Ohio River, and its ports welcomed many laborers from British North America. In 1824, Ludwigstadt was the center of Kentucky's Neo-Platonist rebellion, and even a few years later the lingering Neo-Platonists were a bane for the city. While all of this happened, the city saw an influx of ex-British and Scots-Irish immigration, mostly due to famine and (later) pro-Prydain sentiments in a place that was staunchly pro-monarchy. By the time of the Vespuccian League's fall in 1869, the city was largely English and Irish, though the city's German culture remained as an elite minority. During the rule of the McCoy family in Kentucky (1869-1882), Louisville grew as an industrial center along the Ohio River, competing with British North America's Cincinnati, despite the toil the city took during the Hatfield-McCoy War. This war, however, helped the establishment of factories and housing in the city, which, even under the subsequent French occupation, led to population increase and economic growth. What also happened after this war is, like many other cities that were incorporated into French Louisiana, the city underwent a pro-Francophone name change in an attempt to erase the city's German history. The name was immediately changed from Ludwigstadt to Louisville in 1882.

    Ohio

    Chillicothe - British settlers first named this small outpost as Chillicothe in 1797. It became the capital of the independent Republic of Ohio in 1893 and remained so until the creation of the Great Lakes Peoples Federation in 1932, after which Columbus was made the new capital of the state. It survived the revolution in Ohio as a rather peaceful Ohio city; it is now known affectionately as "Ohio's First Capital" and "Tree City USA".

    Cincinnati - Founded in 1790 by British settlers, its strategic position on the Ohio River made it an appealing industrial center. Starting in the 1830's it was known as Porkopolis, though its steel industry was strong as well. In the next decade, many German immigrants and migrant workers arrived in the city, giving it the nickname "Little Düsseldorf". As the 19th century turned into the 20th century, Cleveland's more modern manufacturing industry caused Cincinnati to lag behind.

    Columbus - Though the British founded this city in 1811, it remained somewhat small until the beginning of the 1900's, when, under the booming Republic of Ohio, it became a rising industrial center. As a center of modernization (and much more in comparison to Cincinnati and Cleveland), it became the capital of the Great Lakes Peoples Federation state of Ohio in 1932. While other Ohioan cities began to show the bruises of deindustrialization, Columbus successfully modernized, and it was for this reason that the city of Columbus remains as Ohio's capital to this day.

    South Carolina

    Hilton Head Island - The area was first mapped by the Dahomean colonizers in the early 1500s, and the island soon became the site of several cotton farms. As these farms grew, so did the population, with the city of Owu being founded in 1554. Owu became a popular vacation and rest site for Dahomey-over-the-Sea's slave-owning elite, both African and European. After Nnamani's rule over Dahomey-over-the-Sea, the city was basically purchased by the cotton tycoon Alexander Hilton in 1818, who named it Hilton Head the following year. Hilton Head, not having strong African influences in architecture (unlike other settlements in the area), became a hub on English culture. Even throughout various wars and the communist takeover, the city remained "Hilton Head Island". In the 1970's, with the fall of communism in Carolina, Hilton Head became an extremely popular tourist destination, and remains so today. The city is also known for its Gullah culture, the result of the emancipation of the slaves in 1859.

    Myrtle Beach - Though Dahomey was the first nation to explore the region in the very early 1500's, the Dutch were the first to establish permanent settlements, with small outposts being founded by 1600. One of these outposts was known as Mirtlestrand, founded in 1618, and was prominent for several reasons. For one, its population consisted of a high amount of Catholic Swiss and Franconian Germans, who would eventually settle farther north in coming decades. In addition, it was home to a large Catholic mission and a significant Italian population, being the only major port in pre-Vespuccia like that. As Mirtlestrand was an important Catholic city and had little ties with the Dutch, it was easily taken by the Pope after the Great Northern War as per the 1718 Treaty of Vienna. Lido Mirto (the Italian name for the Dutch port) and its surrounding areas became a Papal outpost, remaining a possession of the Vatican until 1833, when the now-powerful Vespuccian League appropriated the Church lands with little opposition. Under de jure Vespuccian rule, Lido Mirto (to become Myrtle Beach in 1847), like many other cities of Karolina, saw a gradual Anglification that was virtually complete by 1883. The Baptist and Anglophone Myrtle Beach would become a major resort town by 2013.

    Port Royal - Before the Age of Colonization, the land was inhabited by both Siouan and Muskogean peoples. On August 11th, 1492, a Dahomean exploration vessel, led by Semeo Dofo, made a landing in a secluded estuary in what is now South Carolina. Seeing the land as perfect for settlement, Dofo initiated colonization by the Republic of Dahomey, resulting in the creation of the city of Welcome Port and the colony of Dahomey-over-the-Sea (both retroactive English renderings of Fon names) soon thereafter. From its inception until the late 1700's, Welcome Port was the hub of the slave trade, with most of America's African-descended slaves having passed through the city at least for a portion of their journey across the Atlantic. Welcome Port was known for its rich African culture and powerful African elite, many being owners of African and even Irish servants.

    However, starting with the tenure of John S. Nnamani as colonial governer of Dahomey-over-the-Sea, Welcome Port's African culture gradually yielded to a European/Creole one. In the next century, Dahomey-over-the-Sea's assets were pretty much in the hands of the German, Dutch, and English aristocrats of Vespuccia. In 1856, the Vespuccian government dissolved Dahomey-over-the-Sea, and slavery was abolished soon afterward, resulting in the dissipation of the local African aristocracy's authority. When the Vespuccian League dissolved in 1869, Welcome Port became an administrative center for the Hatfleid family, with them emulating Virginia's English culture on the area. During the Hatfield-McCoy War, Welcome Port was sieged by Anglo-French forces.

    The war catalyzed the change of Welcome Port. After the war, in accordance with English city renaming, the city of Welcome Port became Port Royal in 1883. Becoming a minor city, Port Royal's name was changed once again, this time to Holmes City, under the communist Carolina government in the year 1924. The remaining African structures which didn't survive Nnamani's Europeanization, the dissolution of Dahomey-over-the-Sea, or the Hatfield McCoy War (a very small number indeed) were demolished during the communist era, with the proletariat seeing them as symbols of Dahomey's mercantilist and pro-slavery policies. Carolina abandoned communism and joined the United States in 1971, and the city's name was changed back to Port Royal. Nowadays it is a rather small city in South Carolina, shadowed by Chaleston, Myrtle Beach, and Hilton Head Island.
     
    Last edited: Dec 24, 2015
  4. Ellie Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 22, 2014
    Location:
    Ohio
    1335-1339

    Amochan or The Dawn Lands

    The "Great Migration" marks ethnic redistribution and pains for Cahokia.

    Due to pervasive periods of climate change, leading to significant global cooling known as the "Little Ice Age", the Allegheny/Appalachian peoples of the "Hill Iroquois" cultural croup--that is, the Tuscarora and Cherokee--continue to migrate south. After pushing resident tribal groups south, they finally manage to declare their voyages over (either due to sense of accomplishment or straight up fatalities within the tribe, or both), establishing their present-day homelands. The Cherokee legend tells of a group of eight families finally ending disputes and demarcating their lands, thanks in part to Cahokian mapping techniques. The Tuscarora legend, on the other hand, tells a tale of a powerful emperor-chieftain who manages to subdue locals under his single state, the residents mixing with his people. It would turn out, though, that the Cherokee would be more like a confederation and the Tuscarora more like a single state.

    The Seminole also feel pressured into moving, thanks to peoples pushing them from their traditional homeland. The Seminole are forced into settling the sparsely-populated, thickly-vegetated swampy lands to the south. However, they find their voyage to be alleviated by discovering ruins of a past "rafting culture", from whom the Seminole get the idea to invent a type of "sampan".

    Speaking of Cahokia, this "Great Migration" has the country's oligarchical chiefs worried sick. Peoples who had formerly been located as far away as the eastern side of the "Eternal Smoke Ridge" [1], are now pouring over the empire's rather sophisticated mound borders, pillaging towns and causing general chaos. That, combined with more Absarook raids, is putting pressure on the Cahokians' outdated record-keeping and structural systems.

    The small Mayan fort is established in future Seminole lands, but it's more of a one time deal rather than plans for colonization.

    The Chinese first describe the Dawn Lands.

    For at least decades now, whalers and sailors hailing from Ma'i, to Taiwan, to Japan have rumored about an enormous, mysterious "Dawn Land" over thousands of miles of open ocean. These rumors are backed by retrieved items, such as "exotic red eggplants", "red-yellow, beanlike grains", and even live animals such as, described by Japanese whalers, "a large, ring-tailed weasel". As these accounts become almost commonplace, a young naval captain and son of a former Shentinist monk, Zheng He, is commissioned by the Regency of Tai-Pei (part of Chen China) to conduct a voyage to the Dawn Lands [2]. In early 1335, Zheng He sets out from Tai-Pei to the Isu Archipelago (later known as the Northern Mariana Islands and Guam), heading north to discover a distinct chain of somewhat-advanced Polynesian peoples. Settling his fleet here, he easily impresses the natives and helps them in declaring the "Oahu Kingdom" under Chen control.

    By 1336, Zheng He sets sail once again to complete his journey. He gets carried south by unusual weather patterns, but on February 4th, 1356, Zheng He finally sights and arrives on the Dawn Lands. His first site is a location along the coast of modern-day Colombia. He then sails south, contacting two large empires, Cusco and Chancay. The Chancay are very welcoming to this exotic fleet, donning technology never before imagined. However, Cusco is a little more apprehensive, and does not allow the construction of an "embassy zone" unlike Chancay. Using his skilled sailing crew, Zheng He's Jade Fleet returns to China the way it came by 1337.

    Zheng He returns to Tai-Pei popular among Taiwan's enormous merchant and parcel-owning (=middle) classes. Zheng He's system of establishing Chinese diplomats in the colonies results in a quickly developing Trans-Pacific trade network. Within a century, the Andeans and Aztecs will gain knowledge on better wheel technology, rice and silk cultivation, and architecture. Importantly, in the case of the Andeans, they gain two critical tools: gunpowder (and handgonnes) and a true written system. This technological information will give the natives a "boost" in dealing with the Europeans in the 1480's-1550's. The East Asians, though, will gain lots of American fruits and vegetables decades before the West, gaining tomatoes, cocoa, coffee, (sweet) potatoes, and maize. These ingredients become especially popular in dishes in Taiwan and certain (but very limited) merchant villages in Japan, but are slow or fail to catch on on the mainland.

    Europe

    The Ulaanbaatar Horde approaches ever closer to the heartland of Europe.

    Ogazir Khan, the general in charge of the western Kazakh and Turkmen states of the Horde, finally launches his plans of European domination. After building alliances with the local Kipchak and Cuman tribes for years, he convinces them to assist in his invasion of Muscovite Russia (=Khabroca), defeating the weak duchy in 1356. He them launches a swift campaign to tackle the League of Rostov, where Turkic and Alanian peoples had been taken as slaves in mixed to the point of unclear ancestry, and decisively captures the entire realm by 1359. Only one western member remains, only to reluctantly accept Moldavian vassalship purely out of fear of Mongol conquest. As for Rostov, many Russian nobles retain their positions, though the same cannot be said for the Goths, who lose their status as land-owners and henceforth become mocked peasants.

    Other minor quarrels take place, but that's the norm.

    After a brief hiatus and uneasy peace, the Merovingians of Francia and the Oxfjords of Angland are at war once again, starting in 1337. Many small battles ensue over the Ardennes, many of these being hallmark battles of the High Medieval Period. The war is also accompanied by several peasants' revolts, especially in East Wales (1338) and Merovingian-held Ireland (1339). It seems like the War of the Decades will never have an end...

    The royal house of Lombardy acquires another small central Italian state through marriage of one of its princesses. Lombardy is identifying less and less with the Union of Holy Kingdoms and its Francia-centric policies.

    As Emperor Voldemārs VIII of Latvia dies without heir in 1338, the Empire of Latvia is split among the powerful Prussian Didszullis lords. Though the Voldemārs-es had been tolerant of Lower Europe's last pagans, the Didszullis nobles are not so forgiving, legalizing non-Catholic practices and executing the last pagans before 1339.

    Africa

    Everything's quiet here (before the storm, perhaps?)

    The only notable event here is the consolidation of Southern Roman provinces due to the Mongols' effective invasion. For the most part, trade continues as normal, and wars only occur between small, uncharted tribal states.

    Asia and Ludadao

    From Eastern Rome to the frontier of Koguryo, the Mongols prove to be an effective fighting force.

    In the far western reaches of the Ulaanbaatar Horde, the Mongols are greeted with nothing but success. The previously-mentioned Ogazir Khan--also commander of forces in Caucasia--subdues the last of the resistant mountain peoples in 1356. This helps in maintaining control over the formerly-independent states of Abkhazia, Iberia, and Ossetia, all caste-bound, Christian principalities renown for their "beautiful princesses" and "lucrative resource trade". However, the Sighan Horde does not stop here--it continues southward, conquering the Kingdom of Armenia by 1357. The Caucasian campaign has been won, and the Caucasian Golden Age comes to an abrupt end.

    Long-threatened by the Sighan conquerors (and even before then by the Armenians), the "Roman Kingdom" (=Kurdish Fraternity) continues into the Southern Roman Empire. Originally done by bargaining and slow, legal land grabs, the Kurds now turn to violence to coerce the Romans into ceding lands. What the Romans do is too little, too late, as a few battles with the Kurds results in Kurdish victory. The Kurds attempt to legitimize their victory by asserting their Roman name over the land, hoping to convince the illiterate locals that they are but another Roman regime. In fact, it is the invasion by the Kurds that hurts the Southern Romans more than Sighans, at first, as a few later campaigns will attest.

    The Askarids are yet another people terrorized by the Mongols, with their Persian lands being continually gobbled up.

    The Sighans have perhaps their biggest impact on the Sinosphere Ludadao in 1355-1358. After putting up with massive resistance from the Yan Confucians, the Sighans manage to pour in relentlessly, burning towns and leaving nothing. The Yan continue to fight hard until the capture of Yanjing in 1356, with the city being renamed to Beijing soon after. The rest of the conquests follow suit. The Manchu lord to the north, for a long time the northernmost Confucian lord, is killed in battle and his realm is annexed into the Horde. The other plethora of small Confucian states are eaten up, while others are snagged by the Cui. The original Yan lord of Yanjing, though, is given a small concession from where he will nominally rule (without response from the remaining Yan states) for years. Speaking of these Yan states, they frantically huddle together to resist invasion, though they get the idea to join the more powerful Cui realm and League of the Vermilion Bird.

    In all this chaos, twelve of the thirteen Highest Ministers of Yan, with support of Koguryo, embark on an exodus to establish a new homeland with hopes that the Sighan will crumble within their lifetime (the thirteenth High Minister was the one who stayed behind to rule the powerless Yanjing remnant state, de jure capital of the Yan realm). Each minister rules a separate "republic" (honestly more akin to OTL's caudillos to democratic presidents) in a coastal land of future Siberia, where ethnic mixing happens between the natives and the ministers' crews. These ministers have divided opinions, and the Twelve Republics do not divide at first.

    The balance of power changes in the Confucian world.

    What with all of the war and chaos to the north, things do not go unchanged to the south. Though the Sighan invasion plays a big part in it, what really causes this great change is the invasion of the Dai state. The Viet Confucians, needing funds to invade this well-defended, almost "invincible" lands (the Japanese will share similar accounts pf the area during their colonization spree in the 1890's), increase taxes throughout the Vermilion Bird League, especially in the Cui Ministry. The Cui state, unique for being ruled by a single man, does not bend over for the Viets any more. Its minister, long upset with Viet policy, makes a daring secession. This is followed by several other states' secessions, with which the Cui make a small anti-Confucian realm of their own in 1355. The Viets, however, are certain in their conquest of Dai, and eventually (after three years) the relentless Dai warrior culture gives way to that of the Confucians, thanks to help from Confucian Corandirk.

    Thus, the Cui are more on the spectrum of the other non-Confucian entities of East Asia, in specific the "Triangle of Cipang" [3]--Taiwan, Japan, and the Gaya Confederacy. This results in good relations between the two Chinese non-Confucian entities, as well as the Gaya and Japanese.

    Minor events in Ludadao stand out in a bad time.

    The lands held by the independent Nishimura royal clan are confisgated by the Jou dynasty in 1359, though for the most part, the land is still independent. Now, the Jou claim to be the sole dynastic clan of Wa, though their satellite clans, such as a certain Yamato dynastic clan, claim to have helped in realizing the Jou's claim. The Nishimuras are completely stripped of their noble status, and a Chinese clan takes their place as the rulers of that state. Finally, a unified idea of "Nihon" is becoming realistic.

    The Ikamaui, hoping to restore the fabled "Polynesian Empire" set sail to a charted Polynesian Island in 1357.

    [1] Translated Cahokian name for the Appalachian Mountains.
    [2] Term used in the Sino-Confucian cultural sphere to refer to the Americas, being used up to the close of the 19th century.
    [3] Term used as late as the 1810's to refer to the Insular Sinosphere--the Japanese isles, Taiwan, the Philippines, and by some definitions, Hainan and Sakhalin.
     
    Last edited: Feb 1, 2016
  5. Ellie Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 22, 2014
    Location:
    Ohio
    De Regionibus Orientalibus by Marcus Paulus Apulianus
     
  6. Ellie Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 22, 2014
    Location:
    Ohio
    1305-1309

    Europe

    What is often known to the Anglophone world as the "Mad Mountain War" concludes in 1305 as the Holy Basque Republic concludes what they believe to be their "reconquista" of the whole of their ancestral "aberria". However, mostly the war is a dispute between the local ministers of Galicia and the Duke of Portugal. The HBR also incorporates the Grand Principality of Andorra into its own domain, and steals part of Catalonia, causing both of said states to withdraw from the Union of Holy Kingdoms directly after the war and in 1307, respectively. France, increasingly feudal, cannot respond with a centralized force.

    The French do, however, put down the native peasant rebellion in French Irlande in 1305.

    One important dynastic split to start off the century is the Anglish-Yterlander split in 1305. The Kolabygda Oxford branch splits, and makes its center in Norwege. However, the Anglish require that several holding on the coast remain Anglish, preserving the "North Sea Empire". Johan Måke (Mackay), leader of the (currently) partially-Norwegian Clan Mackay, and by extension the Principality of the Highlands, decides to maintain the Highlands' unification with the seafaring Yterlanders.
    (It should be noted that the current government system in the Highlands bears marked similarity to that of Japan: clans build aliances with one another, and these alliances succeed each other in a competition to be the sole leaders of their domains. Generally a clan doesn't maintain power too long in either place, though the Måke and Jô are exceptions.)

    Another "amicable divorce" happens as Botten leaves the Áigesárri Dynasty in 1308. The new dynasty, of native Finnish and Swedish immigrant descent, is destined to incorporate the Kingdom of Karelia, currently a mostly tribal government.

    This coincides with the Karelians' reforming their governments in 1309, after having let the subservient tribal groups explore the lands for them, disband the system altogether and the king establishes rule over a system of subdivisions based on heritage. King Kusmi is baptized later in the year, and converts Karelia to Christianity. Old faith followers will remain in Karelia, however.

    By decision of the Council of the Holy Kings of the Year 1305, the ancient Order of Moravia is finally disbanded of its remaining sovereign territory (its Moravian homeland), marking the Final Partition of Moravia. This is due to the Order's many failures in converting pagans, Muslims, and Orthodox Christians, and especially the fiasco in Khabrocha some time ago [1]. The former Moravian lands of the Order are given to the Pavlisko dynasty of Slovakia, and the Pavliskos consolidate their realm into the Slovak Union (to become relevant later).

    In 1305, Marcus Paulus Apulianus, the Catholic and Italian explorer commissioned by the Southern Roman Empire to establish new trade networks with and explore Ludadao, returns to his residence in Western Constantinople. He begins work on his records of his travels, De Regionibus Orientalibus, and describes his accounts of the massive wealth of Maharashtra and Tamil Nadu, the strong and effective bureaucracy of Viet, and the merchant culture of the Jade Triangle. Marcus Paulus' terminus of his arrival in Nagasaki, being the first European in recorded history to visit Japan.

    During his return, Marcus Paulus had secretly taken tea leaves after having witnessed and attended a Taiwanese tea ceremony, which he returned to Europe upon his return. He becomes the first person to bring tea to Europe, though it doesn't become popular later. Interestingly enough, in the coming decade, tea will become the favorite beverage of Emperor Eudes II of France, who popularizes its use among the nobility. However, in Britain, it will eventually become a popular beverage for all classes.

    Marcus Paulus is most interested in India, however, due to its greater friendliness with the Roman traders (the Japanese and Chen are not so much admired by a technologically-equivalent force encroaching on them), and the local nobles' desire to adopt Roman customs. Despite Marcus Paulus' begs to the leadership of Rome to "form an intensive trade relationship" with India, the Romans decline, seeing the hotbed of unrest in Morocco as a more important focus. In later centuries, though, this idea will be revived.

    Africa

    In 1307, some traditionalist landowners of Morocco begin to protest against the Empire of Morocco's seizure of local land rights by the government and the attempt to nationalize banks and trade routes (the Empire of Morocco is trying to be centralized in a time where nation-states don't really exist, anywhere). The result is a surge of traditionalists, wanting to take back Morocco for themselves, and generally negative feedback from Europe. The exception is actually the French, whose slave trade with the previous traditionalist regime was banned under the imperialists.

    War between Dahomey and Awazad ends in Dahomey's victory in 1306.

    Due to the "Katangan Mission", several lake nations in Africa begin charting the areas to the south of them. Included is a mission to eventually establish satellite kingdoms to send resources between the Nguni lands and Egypt, with historians giving this the catchphrase "Cape to Cairo" trade network. Included in the "missionaries" and surveyors is the future noble house of the Principality of Malawi. By 1309, several very weak proto-states are crafted, and the Zanzibari-influenced kingdoms are linked with these interior states, establishing a valuable trading path.

    After a feud between the heirs to the throne of the Basotho Kingdom, the tribal councils decide to overthrow the monarchy and establish an Indian-style democracy. The knowledge of such styles of government should be given credit to trade between the Ngunis and the League of Maharashtra.

    Asia

    In 1305, the Sighans, after having control over the Uyghur Horde for years now, decide to adopt its system of stratified government, which has certain similarities to the Confucian states. The current leader in Ulaanbaatar makes much more sensible horde divisions, rather than the previous tribal and outdated Ulaanbaatar/non-Ulaanbaatar system already in place. He also maintains Uyghuria's internal divisions, a policy that will be maintained throughout the Horde's golden years.

    With these new divisions in place, Temuji Khan leads forces into Central Asia, where they impose the bureaucratic system originally of the Uyghurs to divide the land between the military leaders. However, after the first resistance, Temujin Khan realizes that a "peaceful" system of local protectorate khanates that he first imagined will be impossible, so he begins to aggressively ransack Chinese states to the east to acquire weapons and such. However, across the board, the Sighans are successful, and it is the start of something enormous and terrifying for the surrounding states.

    Ludadao

    Koguryǒ expands some more to the north, while Ainus fully conquer the Nivkh tribal lands in the north of Sakhalin.

    The Sambuwangga War is over. The Kingdom of Maguindanao finally has control over all of Mindanao after taking the Sambuwangga Peninsula from the Anhamanhan Confucians. This coincides with a tax increase in all parts of their empire, including Jaeju, which causes lots of hate towards the Confucian rulers as the land is not really profitable anyways. It is about now that the High Ministers of Anhamanhan realize that Jaeju is an enormous waste of resources what with its desert climate and poor soil.

    Amocham

    The Plains peoples in northern Upper Amochan continue to expand in all directions. In fact, the two satellite Absarokan tribes push far enough west to come into contact with the disjunct and unique Pacific Northwest civilization area, which includes the Cayuse and Rain Coast peoples, in the year 1308. The boundary is along a well-fortified position in the Worldwall, so initially the chiefs of the Rain Coast and the Absarokan domain meet together to divide their respective lands at the borders. This coincides with Kootenai expansion to the south, worrying the Cahokians more.

    An old Cherokee legend tells the tale of the Cherokee migration southward beginning some time between 1306 and 1309. According to the old tale, several families decided to move south due to famine and constant attack from their neighbors, who were all lead by militant chieftains. Only a few stay behind in the ancestral homeland in the Monongahela and Allegheny River confluence and surrounding areas, most heading south to yield a better crop.

    The Arawak caciques explore more of the Caribbean, uniting the Taíno under their complex chiefdom.

    The trader colonies in Lower Amochan are directly integrated into the government proper of the Mexica, though the Oaxacans don't really mind.

    [1] See the 1943 turn for the reference.
     
    Last edited: Feb 17, 2016
  7. Ellie Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 22, 2014
    Location:
    Ohio
    It's about time I start on this. It's a WIP, by the way.

     
    Last edited: Mar 28, 2016
  8. Ellie Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 22, 2014
    Location:
    Ohio
    List of Russian leaders:

    Dukes of the Duchy of Gabrots (????-1302)

    ????-1188: Occupation by Idil Horde
    1188-1206: Mihthilda II

    Dukes of the Duchy of Khabroča (1302-1455)

    Tsars of the Tsardom of Russia (1455-1459)

    First Consuls of the Russian Republic (1790-1793)

    1790-1793: Albrecht Filip Holtz

    Emperors of the Russian Empire (1793-1836)

    1793-1827: Albecht Filip, House of Holtz
    1827-1836: Albrecht Filip II, House of Holtz

    Presiding Officials of the Russian State (1836-1853)

    Emperors of the (Second) Russian Empire (1853-1894)

    1853-1858: Albrecht Filip II, House of Holtz
    1858-1894: Johan Albrecht Filip, "Albrecht III", House of Holtz

    Presidents of the Russian Federation (1894-1910)

    1909-1910/1914: Vladimir Mitrofanovich Purishkevich

    Czars of the Restored Czardom of Russia (1910-1920)

    1910-1920: Nicholas Romanov, 11th Duke of Muscovy ("Nicholas II")*

    *Recognition of Nicholas II as the legitimate ruler of Russia during this period is often contested. Some sources cite the Russian Federation as the de jure Russian state until the foundation of the Soviet Union in 1920, while others list this period as being a pure "faction period" with no de jure leadership. However, as the Czarists controlled the majority of population and industrial centers in Russia at the time, this list cites the Czardom of Russia as the de facto Russian state during this decade.

    Chairpersons of the Soviet Union (1920-2006) (originally by CannedTech, with colons added by year numbers)

    1920-1934: Vladimir Ilyich Ulyanov(CPSU: Marxist-Leninist) *
    1934-1956: Iosif Vissarionovich Stalin
    (CPSU: Collectivist)
    1956-1960: Alisa Zinov'yevna Rosenbaum (CPSU: Collectivist)
    1960-1968: Lazar Moiseyevich Kaganovich (CPSU: Collectivist)
    1968-1976: Georgy Maximilianovich Malenkov (CPSU: Revisionist)
    1976-1984: Leonid Ilyich Brezhnev (CPSU: New Collectivist)
    1984-1989: Yuri Vladimirovich Andropov (CPSU: Revisionist)
    1989-1991: Andrei Andreyevich Gromyko (CPSU: Union)
    1991-1993: Boris Nikolayevich Yeltsin (CPSU: Reform)**
    1993-1998: Vladimir Alexandrovich Kryuchkov
    (KGB-CPSU: Union)***
    1998-2006: Alexander Grigoryevich Lukashenko (KGB-CPSU: Union)
    ****

    *Killed by bomb
    **Deposed in coup
    ***Suicide
    ****Final dissolution of the USSR
     
    Last edited: Jun 19, 2016
  9. Ellie Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 22, 2014
    Location:
    Ohio
    Time to work on this again.

    Alabama

    Birmingham - Established from the ashes of an Absarook camp as "Sequoyah's City" in 1554, it became the new capital of the Cherokee Empire. Throughout the centuries, it remained the most important city of the Cherokee (bar the original villages of the "homeland" of the Lower Appalachians) all the way to the resizing of the Cherokee Republic in 1882. After the defeat of the RCR, the Cherokee population of the city was virtually completely deported by Spanish-Georgian forces, and the vacant labor was replaced by cheap and work-hungry immigrants from up north, particularly from Appalachia, Ohio, and Pennsylvania. These immigrants made the city, then called La Magia, their home, and with their help the city of Birmingham became the industrial capital of the south. As such, it became an important city of Louisiana in the early 1900's, and this status was inherited by Alabama in 1991. The city's nicknames, "The Magic City" and "Pittsburgh of the South", refer to important aspects of its history. The former refers to the Georgian control (when the city saw its biggest expansion), and the latter refers to the influence of the influx of immigrants from the North.

    Huntsville - This city was founded in the Vespuccian state of Atsun'sta Ti in 1831 as ᎾᎥᏂᎨᏗᎦᏚᏏ ("Village near the Hills"), it immediately attracted white settlers and slave owners. By 1845, the city was almost entirely white, and upon his being elected as mayor, John Hunt renamed the town in his own honor as Huntsville. The name stuck through thick and thin, even during the RCR's eviction of the white elite in the 1880's and 1890's and the later French occupation. In the United States, it is an important center for aerospace engineering and design.

    Mobile - Founded in 1586 as Mobilus, it became the capital of the newly-founded New Thessalia of the Southern Roman Empire following the Choctaw Offensive. It remained the most important port city of the colony and its successor, Pensacola (both as a Vespuccian state and an independent republic). In 1848, the small republic joined Gran Colombia as the city of Mobile, though the region (and thus Mobile) were largely ignored. When the Northern League/Georgians acquired the region in 1882, the city of Mobile saw a surge of ship traffic, though under French rule (1917-1960) the city of Nouvelle-Orléans remained Louisiana's principal port city. With the fall of French rule (1960) and the admission of Alabama to the Union (1992), Mobile remained a principal city along the Gulf of Mexico.

    Montgomery - Cherokee settlers founded this as the settlement of ᎠᏂᏟᏏᏍᎬ (Anitlisis'gv - "Gathering") in 1676. It remained a small and rather unimportant village until the arrival of the Georgians in 1882, who transformed the Cherokee village into the town of San Fermin. With the arrival of the French from Louisiana in 1917, the city was renamed Montgomery and became the capital of Louisianan Mississippi until its dissolution in 1960. When Alabama joined the Union in 1991, it became the state's capital, though it is not the largest city in that state (that record goes to Birmingham).

    Alaska

    Anchorage - Though the land had been explored by the Scandinavians, the city itself was founded by the Japanese in 1865 as Hakuchō ("The White Town"). The city quickly grew to become the Japanese Empire's major stopping point between continents, as materials and people frequently traveled there during trips from the more densely-populated "Rain Coast" to the Japanese Isles. Hakuchō, despite not being the capital of Arasuka, remained the colony's most important city, even after its acquisition by the rising United States of America in 1970. Hoping to erase the remnants of Japanese culture, the city was renamed "Anchorage" as it was seen as a great place for American ships and people to anchor and expand inland. It remains Alaska's largest city to the present day, by far.

    Fairbanks - Founded in 1902 as Uneri-ogawa ("The Swell Banks"), by Japanese gold prospectors. Being almost exclusively a mining town, it had a very limited economy and was generally ignored by passerbys. When the United States acquired Aliasca in 1970, the name of the city was directly translated to Fairbanks, and it became the hub of interior Alaska. However, unlike the pristine Anchorage, Fairbanks shows a few signs of pollution...

    Arizona

    Phoenix - This city is the descendant of the Aztec city of Xīpetotēc, named after an Aztec life-death-rebirth diety. It was established in 1857 by settlers travelling to Aztlan, and immediately attracted a large population. In accordance with the First Peoples' Confederation's practice of giving benefits to incoming easterners, the Aztecs provided workers' compensation and other benefits for employed eastern immigrants. Thus, many moved to Xīpetotēc. As one of the measured done by the Aztec government to westernize the empire, the city was renamed "Phoenix" (maintaining the rebirth motif) as a way to show a more Euro-American appeal.

    Tuscon - This city is the descendant of the ancient Aztec border city of Xantico, named after the goddess who protected precious things. As a well-fortified border city for many years, the city was very aptly named, responsible for holding off attacks by the Absarook, Hohokam, Portuguese, and Californians. With the expansion into Aztlan in the mid 19th century, Xantico was no longer a border city, though it still attracted many Euro-American settlers, eventually being renamed "Tucson" by Castilian-Californian landowners during the Aztec Reform.

    Arkansas

    Little Rock - From its 1788 establishment by Francophone Vespuccians to its existence under Louisiana, it was known as Ville de la Rochelle. During the Vespuccian Era, it was often nicknamed La Passerelle à l'Ouest, or "The Gateway to the West". Under Louisiana, though, the cities of Nouvelle-Orléans and (especially) Saint Louis took this title from Ville de la Rochelle, also simply called La Rochelle or VR. The name of the city would only be changed to Little Rock upon the United States' victory against Louisiana in 1977.

    Kentucky

    Louisville - Like many of the cities of the lands originally explored by the Dutch (after the Native Americans, that is), this city has its roots in German-Dutch culture. The city was originally founded as Lodewijkstad, named after its founder, Lodewijk van Bergen, in 1700. After the Dutch defeat in the Vespuccian Revolution, many cities in the nation changed their names from the Dutch to the German versions, so Lodewijkstad became Ludwigstadt sometime in the 1720's or 1730's. During this time, Ludwigstadt became a significant trading center along the Ohio River, and its ports welcomed many laborers from British North America. In 1824, Ludwigstadt was the center of Kentucky's Neo-Platonist rebellion, and even a few years later the lingering Neo-Platonists were a bane for the city. While all of this happened, the city saw an influx of ex-British and Scots-Irish immigration, mostly due to famine and (later) pro-Prydain sentiments in a place that was staunchly pro-monarchy. By the time of the Vespuccian League's fall in 1869, the city was largely English and Irish, though the city's German culture remained as an elite minority. During the rule of the McCoy family in Kentucky (1869-1882), Louisville grew as an industrial center along the Ohio River, competing with British North America's Cincinnati, despite the toil the city took during the Hatfield-McCoy War. This war, however, helped the establishment of factories and housing in the city, which, even under the subsequent French occupation, led to population increase and economic growth. What also happened after this war is, like many other cities that were incorporated into French Louisiana, the city underwent a pro-Francophone name change in an attempt to erase the city's German history. The name was immediately changed from Ludwigstadt to Louisville in 1882.

    Ohio

    Chillicothe - British settlers first named this small outpost as Chillicothe in 1797. It became the capital of the independent Republic of Ohio in 1893 and remained so until the creation of the Great Lakes Peoples Federation in 1932, after which Columbus was made the new capital of the state. It survived the revolution in Ohio as a rather peaceful Ohio city; it is now known affectionately as "Ohio's First Capital" and "Tree City USA".

    Cincinnati - Founded in 1790 by British settlers, its strategic position on the Ohio River made it an appealing industrial center. Starting in the 1830's it was known as Porkopolis, though its steel industry was strong as well. In the next decade, many German immigrants and migrant workers arrived in the city, giving it the nickname "Little Düsseldorf". As the 19th century turned into the 20th century, Cleveland's more modern manufacturing industry caused Cincinnati to lag behind.

    Columbus - Though the British founded this city in 1811, it remained somewhat small until the beginning of the 1900's, when, under the booming Republic of Ohio, it became a rising industrial center. As a center of modernization (and much more in comparison to Cincinnati and Cleveland), it became the capital of the Great Lakes Peoples Federation state of Ohio in 1932. While other Ohioan cities began to show the bruises of deindustrialization, Columbus successfully modernized, and it was for this reason that the city of Columbus remains as Ohio's capital to this day.

    South Carolina

    Hilton Head Island - The area was first mapped by the Dahomean colonizers in the early 1500s, and the island soon became the site of several cotton farms. As these farms grew, so did the population, with the city of Owu being founded in 1554. Owu became a popular vacation and rest site for Dahomey-over-the-Sea's slave-owning elite, both African and European. After Nnamani's rule over Dahomey-over-the-Sea, the city was basically purchased by the cotton tycoon Alexander Hilton in 1818, who named it Hilton Head the following year. Hilton Head, not having strong African influences in architecture (unlike other settlements in the area), became a hub on English culture. Even throughout various wars and the communist takeover, the city remained "Hilton Head Island". In the 1970's, with the fall of communism in Carolina, Hilton Head became an extremely popular tourist destination, and remains so today. The city is also known for its Gullah culture, the result of the emancipation of the slaves in 1859.

    Myrtle Beach - Though Dahomey was the first nation to explore the region in the very early 1500's, the Dutch were the first to establish permanent settlements, with small outposts being founded by 1600. One of these outposts was known as Mirtlestrand, founded in 1618, and was prominent for several reasons. For one, its population consisted of a high amount of Catholic Swiss and Franconian Germans, who would eventually settle farther north in coming decades. In addition, it was home to a large Catholic mission and a significant Italian population, being the only major port in pre-Vespuccia like that. As Mirtlestrand was an important Catholic city and had little ties with the Dutch, it was easily taken by the Pope after the Great Northern War as per the 1718 Treaty of Vienna. Lido Mirto (the Italian name for the Dutch port) and its surrounding areas became a Papal outpost, remaining a possession of the Vatican until 1833, when the now-powerful Vespuccian League appropriated the Church lands with little opposition. Under de jure Vespuccian rule, Lido Mirto (to become Myrtle Beach in 1847), like many other cities of Karolina, saw a gradual Anglification that was virtually complete by 1883. The Baptist and Anglophone Myrtle Beach would become a major resort town by 2013.

    Port Royal - Before the Age of Colonization, the land was inhabited by both Siouan and Muskogean peoples. On August 11th, 1492, a Dahomean exploration vessel, led by Semeo Dofo, made a landing in a secluded estuary in what is now South Carolina. Seeing the land as perfect for settlement, Dofo initiated colonization by the Republic of Dahomey, resulting in the creation of the city of Welcome Port and the colony of Dahomey-over-the-Sea (both retroactive English renderings of Fon names) soon thereafter. From its inception until the late 1700's, Welcome Port was the hub of the slave trade, with most of America's African-descended slaves having passed through the city at least for a portion of their journey across the Atlantic. Welcome Port was known for its rich African culture and powerful African elite, many being owners of African and even Irish servants. However, starting with the tenure of John S. Nnamani as colonial governer of Dahomey-over-the-Sea, Welcome Port's African culture gradually yielded to a European/Creole one. In the next century, Dahomey-over-the-Sea's assets were pretty much in the hands of the German, Dutch, and English aristocrats of Vespuccia. In 1856, the Vespuccian government dissolved Dahomey-over-the-Sea, and slavery was abolished soon afterward, resulting in the dissipation of the local African aristocracy's authority. When the Vespuccian League dissolved in 1869, Welcome Port became an administrative center for the Hatfleid family, with them emulating Virginia's English culture on the area. During the Hatfield-McCoy War, Welcome Port was sieged by Anglo-French forces. The war catalyzed the change of Welcome Port. After the war, in accordance with English city renaming, the city of Welcome Port became Port Royal in 1883. Becoming a minor city, Port Royal's name was changed once again, this time to Holmes City, under the communist Carolina government in the year 1924. The remaining African structures which didn't survive Nnamani's Europeanization, the dissolution of Dahomey-over-the-Sea, or the Hatfield McCoy War (a very small number indeed) were demolished during the communist era, with the proletariat seeing them as symbols of Dahomey's mercantilist and pro-slavery policies. Carolina abandoned communism and joined the United States in 1971, and the city's name was changed back to Port Royal. Nowadays it is a rather small city in South Carolina, shadowed by Chaleston, Myrtle Beach, and Hilton Head Island.
     
  10. Ellie Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 22, 2014
    Location:
    Ohio
    Presidents of the Navajo State (1874-1921)

    1874-1877: Silaago Atsabitsee'ii (Democratic-Republican Party)
    1877-1878: António Yaabini'ii (National Party)
    1878-1881: Kii Hayoi (Democratic-Republican Party)
    1881-1884: Azee' Nitl’aatsiiyis’ch’ilii (Unitarian Party)
    1884-1886: Litso Bahazhoni (Democratic-Republican Party)
    1886-1889: Dohii Ketsoh (Democratic Party)
    1889-1898: Zahnii Hashk’aan (Unitarian Party)
    1898-1900: Tohe Nidishchii’ (Democratic Party)
    1900-1901: Nitl'ah Bizaadii (Old Tribal Party)
    1901-1906: Akalii Biyaal (Unitarian Party)
    1906-1910: Lighai Ahastiin "The Respected" (Di Dil Bahane Party)
    1910-1919: Naabahii Tl’ashchi’i "The Revered" (Di Dil Bahane Party)
    1919-1921: Dzil To'aheedliinii "The Highest" (Di Dil Bahane Party)

    Foreword: The Navajo Nation under the late First Peoples Confederation

    The Navajo Nation, a member state of the First Peoples Confederation from 1773 to 1874, was one of that country's most distant members. From the fall of the Ute Kingdom to the Army of the First Peoples in 1832, the Navajo looked to the failed kingdom with interest. The leading Chiefs of the Navajo at this time, including Ahastiin Haltsoi, cited the country's failure to modernize its infrastructure, which still utilized the water-based system characteristic to traditional Great Basin societies. In addition, the Ute Kingdom was under outdated tribal feudalism, whereby lesser chiefs and greater chiefs exchanged services for profit (usually with lesser chiefs providing taxes in turn for protection by the greater chiefs), which was an outdated system in place by the FPC itself. By the 1840's, the Navajo started to criticize this outdated system, leading to a unique political system of the Navajo Nation.

    This ideology came to be known as kéyah akʼis, meaning "state and friendship", which entailed maintaining amicable relations with as many as surrounding polities as possible. As was the case with the Ute Kingdom and other Native American states, a lack of international allies was seen as a grave danger for the country. Thus, by the late 1840's, the Navajo were welcoming foreign traders and explorers from Portuguese, Castilian, and French colonies in America. These individuals were soon welcome to preach their own religions, set up their own businesses, and conduct low-tax trade within the Navajo Nation. Indeed, the help the Navajo provided the original Californian rebels with lodging, supplies, and commodities was crucial to their victory in conquering the Great Basin and Castilian Lower Pacifica. All of this was achieved through the First Peoples Confederation's highly-federal constitution: constituent tribes were allotted their own taxation and government systems, and there was no prohibition against a tribe making formal treaties with foreign nations.

    Due to this federal nature of the constitution, the Navajo were able to transform their domain faster than any other constituent tribe. By 1870, the Navajo possessed the most reliable telegraph system of the FPC, had the most modern railroads (with the Tségháhoodzání Rail Company coming to mind, founded in 1856 and the first railroad of the FPC), and had a sizable middle- and upper-class population living in modern dwellings. In addition, the Ute Nation of the East, having observed and adopted some of the modernization policies under the kéyah akʼis system, began to appear as modern. The federal nature also allowed for the close alliance between the Navajo Nation and California. It was indeed California who protested for Navajo independence from the FPC in 1874, due to the FPC's property collective system, subject to frequent embezzlement and property misuse. So, in 1874, the Californians and First Peoples Confederation signed the Treaty of Las Vegas, granting independence to the Navajo Nation and Ute Nation of the East, founding the future for Navajo prosperity.

    The Early Navajo State
     
    Last edited: May 4, 2016
  11. Ellie Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 22, 2014
    Location:
    Ohio
    1180-1189

    Amochan (Americas)

    The seafaring Thule people, after having engaged in local trade with Amochan, finally realize that Greenland's tundra climate is very poor for plant growth. They attempt to circumvent the issues of their shitty climate (getting colder, as successive winters have shown) by forcefully annexing some of Eothúk's coastal grasslands in a short 1183 war. The New Found Land possessions alleviate rampant hunger and imbalanced diets (consisting almost entirely of whale and varieties of arctic fish for, in many cases, entire lifespans) somewhat, though Thule does not have the population to completely conquer Eothúk, or re-investigate the "long-lost lands of home" in Europe (though legend states the lands are inhabited by fearsome giants).

    The Cayuse manage to buy out tribal leaders of the more organized Athabaskan kind in 1186. Ruled by the merchant class, they use economics to gain a foothold over the coast in 1187, which results in debt peonage on part of the locals.

    Another rough ten years rock the Shoshone Complex. As it turns out, their hydraulic culture is not performing at the level at which the rulers believe it should, due to the sheer amount of wasted water produced during the process of irrigation. This is especially true in the culture's presence along the future Golden Mountain/Oakland Bay (depending on whether you're a Japanese or Californian historian), where the culture dissipates entirely, as well as some interior mountain slopes. The decline is exacerbated by the spread of disease through putrid and ill-maintained aqueducts.

    Plains civilization areas expand a bit.

    The Caddoan Complex shrinks tremendously after a particularly devastating tropical storm during this decade. The torrential rain and wind results in the destruction of the *Floridian farming areas, as well as an organized administration center in the same area. It is around now that the Caddoans become indebted to the Cahokian banks and leaders, and the area is turned into somewhat of a Cahokian puppet.

    The Nahuatl tribes expand north.

    In order to prove their might and form a powerful resistance against the Olmec princes, the three states of the Triple Alliance and their Tenochtitlan center of administration unify into a formal empire in 1181. Thus, the Mexica Empire is born. Fearful about losing their traditional hegemony as the "Progenitor of Mesoamerica" (already long-gone, but still vibrant and alive in the minds of the Olmec) [1], the Olmec invade as a preemptive measure in 1182, but are beaten and pushed back in a counter-attack and a small Mexican conquest.

    The Mixtecs decline somewhat, having been one of the last allies of the Olmec.

    Along the northern coast of Lower Amochan, the final (and most advanced) Caribbean seafaring civilization grows from a few rapid conquests by four allied caciques. They declare the "Great Arawak Confederation of Kings" in 1187, and set about strengthening the bureaucracy. Arawak sailors begin scouting the isles for the first time, choosing vulerably targets to sack and, hopefully later, conquer.

    The M'pachas, like many civilizations, expand.

    Europe

    The Red King's War (1185) happens. The Melånians attack French Britannia via their Canoldeyr vassal, which backfires as the French make a surprising defeat. This attempt at reviving Flurirtir is foiled.

    In France, some administration change happens in 1186. The Boefener/German city-states of the French hinterlands are merged into a collection of several larger states, and the feudal order of the area becomes more centralized somewhat.

    Tirol quietly leaves the Boefen federation in 1188, after its princes had consolidated the country in the year prior. The growing number of Italians has created a major demographic shift for the local Boefen leaders.

    A small war between Moldavia and Magyaria in 1184 results in a Moldavian victory, and the separation of the Magyar realms into two. The Magyars, however, being the faithful Catholics they've generally been, are able to retain their Rots holdings, free of taxes from Moldavia.

    The Idil Horde, having been subjugated by Gabrots in earlier times, begins to rise up against the Gothic nobility in 1183. In come the Kuzarim, hoping to expand their influence into the Gothic towns and establish an extensive trade network with the rest of Europe (besides their outlet in Abkhazia, which is difficult to traverse due to terrain), and they also set about conquering nearby tribal lands. The ensuing chaos sees the entire devolution of borders in Gabrots, as the war turns into manor versus manor, village versus village, and even peasant versus peasant, on top of the Idil barbarians and Kuzarim forces.

    Amidst the chaos, two notable events happen in Gabrots. One, the IXth Crusade (1188-1193) happens when the Pope orders incursions into Gabrots via temporarily-friendly Hweitarots, and the Order of Moravia and POed Hungarian mercenaries attack Orthodox centers. Two, around 1189, the Duchess of Gabrots, Mahthildis II, officially "Slavicizes" her first name as "Matylda" and her surname "Wulf" as "Volkov" in order to create a more Slavic realm. The House of Wulf, after having ruled over Rots under that name for over three centuries now, becomes the House of Volkov, and will continue to rule Russia until the First Russian Revolution in 1790. The late Duke of Muscovy, Nicholas II of Romanov, will have ties to the old Wulf lineage, in fact being a descendant of Matylda II herself. [2]

    Africa

    The Kingdom of Morocco finishes expansion of the Berber kingdoms in 1186, which coincides with the formation of a nearby civilization (not in the key for some reason).

    In West Africa, states and civilizations alike blossom during this decade. Early in the decade, the Ghana Civilization advances some more, but at the expense of the expanding coastal ivory kingdoms. In the interior, the salt kingdoms expand, subjugating local tribal groups. The Bornu and Igo-Fulani Civilizations make marked expansions as well, and in the Igbo region, a structured bureaucracy begins to take form, as does a nearby Yoruba state.

    In times of expansion, the only outlier is the Luda Civilization, whose inland areas fall to tribalism and disorganization, circa 1180.

    Khemet begins to vassalize a nominally Katangan state in 1184.

    Somalia, an autonomous subdivision of the Southern Roman Empire, really gets screwed this decade. Long-divided by tribalism and clan rule (easily visible given its plentiful complex internal divisions), the long-standing Somali Rebellions (11??-1183) end with almost total Roman abandonment of operations in Somalia. The Romans conclude that the economic importance of Somalia is not great enough to continue fighting to preserve the autonomous state, so they just let the warlike clans go their own merry way. By the end of the decade, most of these clans will come under the wing of the growing authority of Cusania/Qosaan, taking advantages of the debts and necessities of the clan-kingdoms (see Asia section for more on Cusania/Qosaan).

    The Malavi Empire can no longer maintain its overstretched trade routes. The incompetent emperor, Asubuhi II, continues sending out expeditionary forces despite the strain on the recently-founded farming communities within the realm. In 1187, facing crippling taxes for worthless expeditions, the tribes and farmers revolt against Asubuhi II and the Malavi, causing a slow decay that will last into the next century. Only the Zanzibar and Swahili coast areas will remain firmly in Malavi hands, being the homeland of the Asubuhi monarchs.

    The chaos in the Malavi Empire allows the revolt of some Malagasy tribes in Madagascar in 1189, who establish a civilized complex in the north of the island.

    In the Tsulu-Nguni War (1181), the growing Tsulu Civilization defeats the Lesser Nguni Empire. The Tsulus steal the Nguni's ideas of bureaucracy, copying the system in their own areas. Interestingly, around this same time, some Tsulu traders manage to acquire of Roman manuscripts and books detailing the very ancient Roman Republic and its Consulate system of government. Enticed by this system, which will hopefully alleviate tribal factionism and allow greater advancement for the Tsulus, they begin to undergo slight "Romanization" despite the lack of a significant Roman presence beyond the occasional passing of trade ships.

    Asia (West, South & Central Asia)

    Ionas II, King of Cusania, begins to buy out Roman inspectors in 1181, thereby making his realm more autonomous. From here, he goes about creating an extensive trade network for his state, monopolizing Roman businesses for his state, whose only real source of wealth is the small Lake of Cusania. After the end of the Somali rebellions in 1183, Cusania will have significant influence over the recently-independent clan-states. In 1188, the name "Cusania" will become obsolete, coinciding with the Arabization of Cusania, resulting in the name "Qosaan".

    The fall of the great "anticaliphate" (think antipope), either that or "anti-imamate" (depending on whether the predecessor was Sunni or Shiite) could not be more obvious. One of its direct successors, the Zarpakist Emirate, is becoming increasingly unstable and unwieldy. Slipping into eventual dissolution, the local generalissimos are gaining more and more power in the affairs of the country. Following yet another war with the Karayosefids in 1181-1183, the Zarpakist generals of the Caspian Sea become virtually independent: one of such generals will lead the feudal state starting in 1186, and this particular individual will be descended from an Askarid noble. Mazandaran will become fairly autonomous as well, being especially dangerous due to the region's significant population. The lands still under Zarpakia, though, will become more and more radical, gaining negative attention from Ibadi and mystic Islam communities, as well as Jews and Christians.

    The Irfanids, another descendant group, go about unifying recently-independent tribal states under their emirate, hoping to build a force strong enough to take down the radical Zarpakist feudal state.

    Another successor is the Popazai [3] state, ruled by a relatively-young Pashtun family with military origins. Like the Zarpakist Emirate, the Popazai Empire comes under pressure from feudalism--so much so that, in 1185, the country breaks up almost completely, with the Popazai dynastic name as the sole unifying force. The two most-powerful Popazai dynasty states are the Kingdom of Gujarat, led by the conservative Muslim Garfoor Shah Popazai, and the interesting Sikh Kingdom, led by the recent convert and first king Shujah Shah Popazai. Upon Shujah Popazai's death in 1188, the Sikh Kingdom transforms into the Sikh Republic, with basis on Bharat-style republican governments and religious freedom. The Popazai will fare much, much better than the Zarpakists due to their greater tolerance of religion (free practice allowed everywhere in the empire, provided good behavior towards the state) and more amicable relations between feudal lord and vassal.

    The state on the Gujarat Peninsula, also a successor state, comes under influence of Qosaan's growing trade network in 1189.

    The Kaliist Great Bharat is, de jure, no more after 1182. This is due to the Vizag Secession, which sees many dissatisfied noble states, centered aroung Vizaghapatnam, secede from the Kaliist radical regime. Of course this leads to the Kaliist invasion and the Great Vizag Strife (1183-1187), one of the more deadly wars in India's history, as the seceding states are joined by Nusantara and some Raipur volunteers, many of them Confucianist. The crippling result is the effective end of the term "Great Bharat" to refer to this state, and following 1187, historians generally refrain from calling it "Great Bharat", instead preferring "Tamil Nadu", the name of a later state led by the more moderate Kandiyars.

    Ludadao (East Asia & Australasia)

    The Third Sino-Korean War (1189-1193) begins. The Kingdom of Koguryo and the Tan Dynasty have long-standing issues with one another, but this time, the war starts over a trivial quarrel between a parcel of land claimed between two noble town leaders. The Tan respond with a large army, while Koguryo sends in its traditional (and outdated) cavalry. Tan's advanced technology is no match for Koguryo, who is pushed to the coast of the San-dong Peninsula. In turn, they are forced to retract their claim from Yan (with its capital Yanjing known to Koguryo as Yeon-gyeong) following an unsuccessful cross-through maneuver. Khitan Lang responds with a quick invasion of some distant Koguryo hinterlands, a quick victory for the Lang since Koguryo can't really focus much on its unimportant outskirts.

    The other Tan war is the Dali War (1189-1193), having started due to the constant clashes between the Tan and other peoples of Huaxia, and the Buddhist Union.

    The year 1186 is generally described as the year of the end of the Sengoku (Warring States) period in Japan. The power vacuum following the collapse of the original Union of Wa was always a host for constant warfare between rival clans. The wars were exacerbated by the introduction, following, and promulgation of Confucianism by several politicians and scholars of Wa. The most successful of such was the Iyo Harmony, more properly known as the Great Harmonious Realm of Iyo-no-futana-shima, as attempted to invade the capital of Wa, Nara, at least twice, with hopes of uniting Wa under Confucianism. This time around (1182), though, the plan completely fails, as the Aneyama monarch sends a counter force to Shikoku (as it is known to the rest of Wa), conquering the island with the help of a local noble clan. To the north, the Great Edo War (11??-1184), part of the Sengoku period, comes to and end. Both countries arrive at a draw, and Edo undergoes a pro-Wa coup, while indebted Tohoku considers rejoining due to monetary issues. Under the Aneyamas, Japan is once again peaceful, and possibly it will reunite under Wa...

    In 1184, the Chen defeat Ryukyu and conquer some of their islands.

    The Confucian power in Southeast Asia is growing. Following the defeat of the sonservative Harmonious Khmer Realm some time ago, the victorious Viet reorganizes itself to include formerly Khmer lands as integral divisions in 1186. As like-minded Confucian states in Huaxia defeat the Chen in a small 1187 war, said states convene with Viet to create a union known as the League of the Vermilion Bird. Nusantara is not invited due to previous conflicts between the insular and peninsular Confucians, though Nusantara is convinced it doesn't need the LVB due to its own sheer size and influence over the Indian Ocean trade.

    In 1188, the Kingdom of Siam (which formed from the Indian-esque Republic of Siam) faces a coup by the king's Confucian advisors (get used to this, monarchs of Asia, these coups will be frequent...), and Siam joins Viet with hardly any violence. The annexation is amicable as the king of Siam was pretty unpopular with the nobility and peasants.

    By 1185, the two separate Māori civilizations, Aotearoa (North Island and Eastern Pacific) and Te Waipounamu (South Island), see development into fully-fledged states, as both states develop iwi systems to divide the land based on tribal alliances. Aotearoa manages to become more centralized, while Te Waipounamu breaks into a feudal-type system, headed by the Natani tribe. Much of the development coincides with further exploration and settlement on Corandirk and some Polynesian islands by both civilizations.
    ________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

    Notes

    [1] What if the Olmec are like a Rome analogue for Mesoamerica? Also, what if the Olmec are like China, with their writing system being the parent system used by many Mesoamerican groups? This would explain the shared Mayan-Aztec script despite the fact that these two empires are neither close in proximity nor friendly with each other.

    [2] I just looked this up in a Gothic dictionary, so it may not be correct. Apparently the etymology of Volkov stems from an old Slavic word for wolf, so I went the same route in making the Gothic name. So please correct me if I'm wrong. :)

    [3] Just going off the key here, trying not to butcher Po(l)pa(o)(l)z(a)i yet again... :p
     
    Last edited: May 5, 2016
  12. Ellie Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 22, 2014
    Location:
    Ohio
    History of Castilian/Spanish States

    Kingdom of Madrid (????-1225) and League of Castile (1202-1225)

    United into the (First) Kingdom of Castile in 1225 as the Kingdom of Madrid consolidated the League of Castile, itself founded in 1202 (OOC: an approximation by me; the year this happened is not explicitly stated in the 1200-1209 turn) as a Madrid-centered Iberian league to compete with the Oriental League and Bilbao League.

    (First) Kingdom of Castile (and Portugal/Andalusia) (1225-1478)

    Formed from the Kingdom of Madrid's consolidation of the League of Castile in 1225, mostly done due to the Basque Revolution of 1221 to 1223. United with Valencia under a dynastic union from 1236 (OOC: another approximation by me; the year is not explicitly stated in the turn) to 1400. Also united with Portugal under a dynastic union with lasted from 1248 to 1462 (OOC: this is yet another approximation, Portugal's independence isn't explicitly stated). Seceded from the Union of Holy Kingdoms in 1256 after an attempt by France to increase its power in said union. Fought in the Mad Mountain Far from 1300-1305, losing to the Holy Basque Republic. Annexed almost all of Andalusia during the Moroccan Civil War in 1319. Reconquered most of the land lost in the Mad Mountain War in the 1428-1431 Blue War. Succession issues, exacerbated by the end of the unions with Portugal and Valencia, led to the Republican Wars, and the end of the First Kingdom.

    (First) Republic of Castile and Andalusia (1478-1844)

    Aristocratic, nobility-led republic founded at the end of the Republican Wars, when the republicans overcame the monarchists in a succession crisis starting in 1473 (OOC: apparently we forgot to do the 1470-1474 turn, so this is a retcon, and a necessary one, I feel). Founded its first colony on Santo Domingo island in 1479 and initially raced against Morocco for colonial power until the early 1500's, when France, Portugal, and the young Kingdom of England joined in. Established Puerto Sabana in what would become Georgia in 1524. In 1665, New Castile (renamed Pacifica in 1754) was founded with the establishment of Anacortes in the Puget Sound area. In 1667, Patagonia was founded in what is now La Lobería. Had de facto rule over Portugal from 1581 to 1619. Managed to stay neutral in many wars, such as the Great Northern War of 1713-1718. Lost New Grenada in 1786, which declared independence as the anti-Latin Union Kingdom of Gran Colombia. This crushed Castilian morale so badly that Castile had a very limited role from the Russian Revolution to the Grand European War (in total, encompassing 1790-1806). Grew increasingly weak, losing influence over Georgia in 1832 and even ceding much of Pacifica to the young Empire of Japan in 1842.

    (Second) Republic of Castile and Andalusia (i.e. "The Blue Mountain Republic" and "Northern League") (1844-1919)

    More democratic government founded in 1844 after economic troubles, monarchist fervor, and losses in Georgia and against Japan. Incorporated Pacifica colony and Northern League vassals into the country, and its flag now featured a blue triangle in the center (each corner representing Pacifica, Patagonia, and Castile--hence the "Blue Mountain Republic"). Mostly lost Pacifica by 1849 (besides a short 1861-1862 pro-republican rebellion), and gave independence to Patagonia as Argentina in 1898. Recaptured Georgia in 1867 under the "America Company", consolidated it in 1913, but lost it to France (Louisiana) in 1917. Fought against the Fernandista monarchists, the competitor Castilian state, during almost its entire resistance. Finally succumbed to pro-monarchist sentiment in Castile proper in 1908, and disbanded in 1919.

    (Second) Kingdom of Castile (i.e. "The Fernandistas") (1845-1919)

    Started as a pro-monarchist movement in Pacifica, a Castilian colony in North America, under the House of Ferdinand. First tried to take control of Andalusia in 1851 but were pushed off in 1862 with only a claim left behind. Seized control of Morocco from the collapse of the Southern Roman Empire in 1858. Lost most of Pacifica between 1861-1862, only keeping joint control with Britain in Oregon, even that was lost in 1880. Tried again to take Andalusia in 1875, though the movement devolved into anarchism, but ends up successfully uniting them and taking Andalusia in 1882. Fernandistas survive in Morocco after Moroccan War of Succession (1897-1902), declare unification of Castile and Morocco (1903), and annex most of Castile from the Northern League (1904), and really grow after the Northern League's 1919 collapse.

    First Kingdom of Spain (1919-1949)

    Established after the split of the Northern League, the former republican Castilian government, in 1919. Got involved in the Socialist War in 1944 after suppressing Grenadine socialists.

    People's Republic of Spain (1949-1975)

    Communist state established at the end of the Socialist War in 1949. Absorbed nearby non-communist states in Galicia, Catalonia, and the Basque Country by 1967.

    Second Kingdom of Spain (1975-Present)

    Democratic, nationalist government backed by the anti-communist powers. Founded in the midst of the Spanish Civil War (1972-1983)
     
    Last edited: May 10, 2016
  13. Ellie Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 22, 2014
    Location:
    Ohio
    I skipped out on Australia-Pacifica for now, and hoped to give a good explanation for Ecotopia, and an interesting one for Romania.

    1923 - The Revolutionary Flower Spreads Its Petals

    Americas

    This is perhaps the biggest year in the history of California-Cascadia. Politics have changed significantly since the addition of Alaska, Yukon, and the lower half of British Columbia some time ago. Beginning during the presidencies of Albert Cartwright and Andrew Pico, a stress for economic "distributionism" (the current "in" term for "socialism"), ecological conservation in the face of environmental degradation (the Cali-Cascadians are very concerned for their environment, itself a stem from Californio culture of care for the land), and a more unitary system. Thus the "Constitution of 1923" comes into effect with immense popular support. The biggest change is the official name changing from the "Republic of California-Cascadia" to the "Republic of Ecotopia", the result of a uniquely Cali-Cascadian blend of distributionism and environmentalism. "Ecotopia", a term used by the distributionist thinkers of the late previous century, is chosen as it was first coined by a native Cascadian, Wallace Fisher. In addition, the constitution creates a more unitary state, and of course, finishes the job for making the country more distributionist (think something a slight bit more socialist than 2016's Sweden IOTL).

    Meanwhile, in the American Republic, change is neither so welcomed nor so peaceful. Now that the rationalist rebels have captured major population centers, such as Houston and New Orleans, it is clear to foreign observers that the rebels are more than just "red-necks with guns" (as a Pennsylvanian newspaper put it). With the swift rationalist capture of many border lands, the Mexicans and Virginians begin to push into American Republic lands in an effort to preserve the government. The Missourians, though, have a slightly different plan. Though they too fear the rationalists, their history of conflict with the Americans prevents them from splitting the pie of their movements, and they pave a path to the city of Memphis. Missouri, with its small military, will not fare well for very long.

    It is also during this year that the rationalist rebels come to terms about their plans for the country. Led by George "Brick Wall" Bathurst, the ECSA's first General Technical Secretary, the slight factionism in the rationalist movement is nullified as an agreement is made codifying the highly federal nature of the rebels, due to their origins in many different parts of the country. In order to ensure a federation without friction, the name "Equal Confederacy" is coined, as previously the rebels had called themselves the "American Federal Rationalists". The new name sounds a lot more inclusive, and thus more attractive.

    The final guerrillas for the old monarchy of (Neo-)Tawantinsuyu, centered around Lake Titicaca (noteworthy for being the location of "Auqui's Last Stand"), are defeated. The rationalist movement in Tawantinsuyu, while not so violent as those in Russia (which will fail) or America (which will succeed), will be quite successful.

    To the south, in the Andean areas of Spanish Río de la Plata, the final Mapuche resistance movement is squashed. The Mapuche had been a very formidable and threatening obstacle for the Spanish ever since the old colonial days (just like OTL), and it is just now that the Spanish are able to completely defeat them. As Spain makes use of relatively new technologies, such as airplanes and radio, the technologically-lagging Mapuche are now fruitless against mighty Spain. However, as the Rationalist Federation of Tawantinsuyu is now firmly in power, the Spanish realize that an attack on the Incas is not within Spain's tactical abilities, so they don't attack... yet.

    Europe & Russia

    The chaos of the Russian Civil War continues. However, in European Russia, the Blue forces recover many lost lands, and the rationalists are beaten back. In Poland, the Polish nationalists and Blue Russians suddenly cooperate against the shared Rationalist threat, as the Poles gain ground but lose to the German rebels to the west. Meanwhile, the European and Kalmykia region rationalists are severed, and Finland, strongly White for a while, continues as a bastion for Rational thought. The rationalist guerrillas in Central Asia are also mostly defeated, though not at the hands of the Blues but rather various tribes and independence movements. The rationalists lose two key areas in the Far East: Vladivostok, where the Blues recapture an important Russian Pacific port, and in the Kolyma region and greater Magadan, where, despite the bone-chilling cold of January-April 1923 (where temperatures dipped to nearly -60 Celsius), determined Blue forces break the ice and capture the local Rationalist warlord.

    Meanwhile, various nationalistic movements pick up steam. The Central Asian groups, already having mostly wrestled control of the region from both the Whites and Blues, contest each other for control. The biggest losers are the various tribal factions, either getting eliminated by or assimilating into the more powerful Kazakh, Uzbek, Tajik, and Kyrgyz movements (the Turkmen movement failed to materialize due to tribal conflicts and local disputes, so most simply joined the ranks of the Uzbeks). The UROWR, somewhat abandoning its pacifist nature under a new General Technical Secretary, pushes into Uzbek and tribal areas to secure some rationalist territory. Meanwhile the Sadozai King sends Bactrian forces into traditionally Pashtun lands on a nationalistic basis. Meanwhile, the Uyghurs and Mongols gain ground, expelling Blue guerrillas and forces. It is also during this time that the Chinese invade Blue lands, opportunistically seizing the moment as the Manchus rebel against the Russian government. Finally, despite Blue Russia's recapturing of the main mainland ports of Vladivostok and Magadan, Hara Takashi's supporters make siginificant gains on the Russian Far Eastern Islands. Hara's movement, centered in Kyoto, manages to capture the Kanto region and the major port of Edo (to be named Tokyo by the Japanese during and after their war for independence in the 1980s-1990s). The rebels also pop up on Yesso (also to be renamed Hokkaido later), but the Kyushu rebels are defeated.

    It should be noted that many Uzbek women fought for the freedom of their people, and all-women units frequently engaged with Russian Blues and Whites in a struggle for freedom.

    The young Functionalist Republic of Bulgaria, seeing weakness in Russia, begins to spread its wings, preparing for an attack against its first victim, the feeble Kingdom of Romania. It all starts when, in the face of popular unrest, King Michael II abdicates, leaving a vacancy in the monarchy, in February. Then, the notably anti-Bulgarian military leader, Dragomir Gabor, quickly seizes power from the Prime Minister and establishes the interim government, a.k.a. the "Romanian State", in March. Just a few weeks after the start of his rule as an autocrat and dictator, there is an attempt to take his life by a local terrorist group, the Silver Guard. As some of these members are Bulgarians (who make up a notable proportion of Romania's population at the time, to be redistributed after the War of Concord), the terrorists are executed, and Gabor sends the infamous "Gabor Letter" to Bulgarian president Zlatan Filipov demanding reparations against destruction of state property and reimbursement for the attempted assassination. Filipov, clearly more ambitious and rowdy than his associated presidents in Spain and Italy, rebuffs the impolitely-written letter and sends an invasion force to dispose of Romania's "wicked leadership". The invasion is very successful, and Russia can't do jack squat due to its civil war. Romania is occupied by late July, and Gabor is imprisoned and later murdered by a "extra-governmental" vigilante group. In late August, the "Republic" of Romania, a Bulgarian puppet, is declared, increasing hostility towards far-right nationalistic regimes in Europe. Governments in Serbia and Hungary cower in fear, though they realize they can't realistically defeat Bulgaria in a war, even combined, due to internal troubles within their own countries.

    Africa

    Nigeria, a colony with a significant White presence due to the various colonial wars and conflicts with tribes, is quite invaluable. As it is seen as Western Africa's version of the Dominion of South Africa, it is granted dominion status late in the year. Like Southern Africa, Western Africa now has an important dominion to have a heavy hand in conducting regional affairs. An idea of a dominion with a large non-White population is no longer alien since India was granted dominionship some time earlier.

    Asia

    Around now, Tamil cinema becomes a thing, being immensely popular among the Tamil Empire's people. Tamil cinema will be the inspiration for the development of "Bollywood" later in Indian history.

    Another change happens this year as Rama VII, King of Siam, endorses the "(Thai) Constitution of 1923)". This constitution codifies Thai nationalism and the evolution of the old order, as the country's name is changed from the "Kingdom of Siam" to the "Kingdom of Thailand". This is clearly a move to copy the name change of the "Empire of Mysore" to the "Tamil Empire" which happened some time ago, and as a reaction of anti-rationalist sentiment in the face of China's conquest of Indochina. In addition, the constitution is the first in Siamese history, and a parliamentary system similar to that of the United Kingdom is created.

    Map 103 (1st Jan 1923).png

    Map 103 (1st Jan 1923).png
     
    Last edited: May 10, 2016
  14. Ellie Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 22, 2014
    Location:
    Ohio
    1827

    filler
     
  15. Ellie Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 22, 2014
    Location:
    Ohio
    I like the new smilies! :D

    :confused::confused::p:oops::rolleyes::rolleyes:o_O
     
  16. Ellie Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 22, 2014
    Location:
    Ohio
    That concludes this spoiler test. A cool feature if you ask me. :D

    Cool, the board also supports strikethrough.
     
  17. Ellie Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 22, 2014
    Location:
    Ohio
  18. Ellie Well-Known Member

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  19. Ellie Well-Known Member

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  20. Ellie Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 22, 2014
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    Next update.

    Alabama

    Birmingham - Established from the ashes of an Absarook camp as "Sequoyah's City" in 1554, it became the new capital of the Cherokee Empire. Throughout the centuries, it remained the most important city of the Cherokee (bar the original villages of the "homeland" of the Lower Appalachians) all the way to the resizing of the Cherokee Republic in 1882. After the defeat of the RCR, the Cherokee population of the city was virtually completely deported by Spanish-Georgian forces, and the vacant labor was replaced by cheap and work-hungry immigrants from up north, particularly from Appalachia, Ohio, and Pennsylvania. These immigrants made the city, then called La Magia, their home, and with their help the city of Birmingham became the industrial capital of the south. As such, it became an important city of Louisiana in the early 1900's, and this status was inherited by Alabama in 1991. The city's nicknames, "The Magic City" and "Pittsburgh of the South", refer to important aspects of its history. The former refers to the Georgian control (when the city saw its biggest expansion), and the latter refers to the influence of the influx of immigrants from the North.

    Huntsville - This city was founded in the Vespuccian state of Atsun'sta Ti in 1831 as ᎾᎥᏂᎨᏗᎦᏚᏏ ("Village near the Hills"), it immediately attracted white settlers and slave owners. By 1845, the city was almost entirely white, and upon his being elected as mayor, John Hunt renamed the town in his own honor as Huntsville. The name stuck through thick and thin, even during the RCR's eviction of the white elite in the 1880's and 1890's and the later French occupation. In the United States, it is an important center for aerospace engineering and design.

    Mobile - Founded in 1586 as Mobilus, it became the capital of the newly-founded New Thessalia of the Southern Roman Empire following the Choctaw Offensive. It remained the most important port city of the colony and its successor, Pensacola (both as a Vespuccian state and an independent republic). In 1848, the small republic joined Gran Colombia as the city of Mobile, though the region (and thus Mobile) were largely ignored. When the Northern League/Georgians acquired the region in 1882, the city of Mobile saw a surge of ship traffic, though under French rule (1917-1960) the city of Nouvelle-Orléans remained Louisiana's principal port city. With the fall of French rule (1960) and the admission of Alabama to the Union (1992), Mobile remained a principal city along the Gulf of Mexico.

    Montgomery - Cherokee settlers founded this as the settlement of ᎠᏂᏟᏏᏍᎬ (Anitlisis'gv - "Gathering") in 1676. It remained a small and rather unimportant village until the arrival of the Georgians in 1882, who transformed the Cherokee village into the town of San Fermin. With the arrival of the French from Louisiana in 1917, the city was renamed Montgomery and became the capital of Louisianan Mississippi until its dissolution in 1960. When Alabama joined the Union in 1991, it became the state's capital, though it is not the largest city in that state (that record goes to Birmingham).

    Alaska

    Anchorage - Though the land had been explored by the Scandinavians, the city itself was founded by the Japanese in 1865 as Hakugai ("The White Town"), written with Ateji 白街. The city quickly grew to become the Japanese Empire's major stopping point between continents, as materials and people frequently traveled there during trips from the more densely-populated "Rain Coast" to the Japanese Isles. Hakugai, despite not being the capital of Arasuka, remained the colony's most important city, even after its acquisition by the rising United States of America in 1970. Hoping to erase the remnants of Japanese culture, the city was renamed "Anchorage" as it was seen as a great place for American ships and people to anchor and expand inland. It remains Alaska's largest city to the present day, by far.

    Barrow - A little-known fact is that the Scandinavians founded the city in 1829 as Barø, which was originally the northern terminus of a planned network of trails for trading. The misconception is often due to the fact that the Japanese acquired joint ownership of the settlement in 1839, and in 1842 it was completely ceded to them. As the settlement was populated by a mere ten people at the time, the Japanese had little trouble in removing Scandinavian influences (including a name change to Sakamoto, written as 坂本), though as was often the case in post-Scandinavian Japanese America, the original white settlers were treated well (much more so than their Castilian peers). During the Japanese era, it was a city mostly used for Arctic research. It never even had roads extending to nearby villages; all travel in and out was conducted by occasional flights by small airplanes. When the United States acquired Alaska in 1970, the city was renamed to "Barrow" as a homage to the original Scandinavian settlers.

    Fairbanks - Founded in 1902 as Yogashi, written with Ateji 良河岸, by Japanese gold prospectors. Being almost exclusively a mining town, it had a very limited economy and was generally ignored by passerbys. When the United States acquired Aliasca in 1970, the name of the city was directly translated to Fairbanks, and it became the hub of interior Alaska.

    Ketchikan - Home to a Tlingit settlement for centuries, the official incorporation date is cited as when the Japanese founded this small port in 1855 as Kichikan (taken from a Tlingit name), then written with the Ateji kanji 貴知寒. During the long Japanese era, it was renown for its salmon fisheries, which is still a mark of fame for the city today, as it now has the nickname "Salmon Capital of the World". When the Japanese ceded Alaska to the young United States of America in 1970, the city's name was generally kept the same, save for the change from the initial "Ke" to "Ki" to coincide with local pronunciation.

    Sitka - Also the site of Tlingit encampments for ages, the Castilians first founded the city proper in 1770 as Notelén, and a castle was built which survives to the present day. In the final decade of the 1700's and the first two of the 1800's, the increasingly-powerful Yamato nobles often visited this city, as they scouted out potential property options. In 1838, when the Japanese imperial forces made a treaty with Scandinavia and Castile to gain refuge zones in North America, Notelén was chosen as one of the zones. In 1842, following the assassination of a Japanese noble, the area was ceded to Japan, and the city was renamed to Shitsuka, written in Ateji as 質香, which was derived from a Tlingit phrase (the city was also informally called "New Akita" during the Japanese age). Shitsuka was by far the most important trading city north of Daikigi (currently Bella Coola, British Columbia, Canada) until the growth as Hakugai in the early 20th century, when Shitsuka's population began to decline as citizens moved elsewhere. In 1970, the United States acquired Alaska, and as was the case with most other formerly-Japanese cities with names of indigenous origin, the name was mostly kept the same, albeit changed to "Sitka" to reflect American pronunciation.

    Arizona

    Phoenix - This city is the descendant of the Aztec city of Xīpetotēc, named after an Aztec life-death-rebirth diety. It was established in 1857 by settlers travelling to Aztlan, and immediately attracted a large population. In accordance with the First Peoples' Confederation's practice of giving benefits to incoming easterners, the Aztecs provided workers' compensation and other benefits for employed eastern immigrants. Thus, many moved to Xīpetotēc. As one of the measured done by the Aztec government to westernize the empire, the city was renamed "Phoenix" (maintaining the rebirth motif) as a way to show a more Euro-American appeal.

    Tuscon - This city is the descendant of the ancient Aztec border city of Xantico, named after the goddess who protected precious things. As a well-fortified border city for many years, the city was very aptly named, responsible for holding off attacks by the Absarook, Hohokam, Portuguese, and Californians. With the expansion into Aztlan in the mid 19th century, Xantico was no longer a border city, though it still attracted many Euro-American settlers, eventually being renamed "Tucson" by Castilian-Californian landowners during the Aztec Reform.

    Arkansas

    Little Rock - From its 1788 establishment by Francophone Vespuccians to its existence under Louisiana, it was known as Ville de la Rochelle. During the Vespuccian Era, it was often nicknamed La Passerelle à l'Ouest, or "The Gateway to the West". Under Louisiana, though, the cities of Nouvelle-Orléans and (especially) Saint Louis took this title from Ville de la Rochelle, also simply called La Rochelle or VR. The name of the city would only be changed to Little Rock upon the United States' victory against Louisiana in 1977.

    California

    Los Angeles - Though there were occasional contacts in the past by the Arisona Kingdom and the Absarook in pre-European times, the Portuguese were the first to establish a settlement in the region. In 1668, Portugal, pressured by President Alfonso Pereira, Duke of Barcelos, made an expedition along the western coast of North America in order to compete with Castile. The Portuguese, under explorer Diogo de Silva, founded the settlement of Costa Mesa (still exists in Orange County, California). The city of Los Angeles itself was founded in 1686 as Cidade dos Anjos (becoming the colonial capital in 1698) after further scouting missions and small land deals with the Chumash tribes in the area. From then until the late 1770's, Portuguese Santa Ana, as it came to be named, was mostly a trading colony with little interest in expanding inland due to geography and general disinterest in the dry region. This all changed during the Gran Colombian Revolution, when Portugal's alliance with Gran Colombia meant Santa Ana becoming more built-up. From this point until the 1810's, colonial rushes spearheaded by military officers saw the area completely settled, and Cidade de Anjos was the hub of the colony, due to its harbor and perfect geography. As the Portuguese's own culture mixed with that of immigrant servants from Asia and Tawantinsuyu, the city became a center of cultural fusion. The westward migration of Vespuccian, French, and British settlers starting around the same time bolstered this cultural explosion. After the Californian victory over Pacifica in 1861, Portuguese Santa Ana was destined to fall to California; the Portuguese knew this well, due to the presence of Californian allies and landowners within Cidade dos Anjos' walls. Californian territoriality rights in Santa Ana were granted in 1870; all but the neighborhoods of Malibu (which then also included Malibu Beach), Topanga, Paliçadas Pacíficas, and Santa Monica were ceded directly to California in 1876; finally in 1883, Portugal rescinded all ownership of the area to California. Under California, the city saw the inauguration of Alberto Malaga, a hispanophone Californio, which coincided with the change of the city's name from Portuguese to Spanish, becoming "Los Angeles". It was always an important center of industry and culture in California despite not being the capital, especially after the beginning of cinema in nearby Hollywood in 1914. At the same time, immigrants from all over, from Montezuma, to Britain, to the Japanese Empire, and other locations added to the already-existent cultural mix. In 1952, the city was attacked by a heavy naval bombardment by the Japanese, an order condoned by then-Prime Minister Tōjō Hideki, bringing California and many other western American republics into the First Soviet-Japanese War. The city rebuilt quite rapidly after the bombing, relying on increased immigration from Louisiana and other states. By this time, the city's population had reached 2.6 million. In the 1990's, the city was the site of intense gang violence, but since then, troubles have dissipated, and it remains California's biggest city.

    San Francisco - From the 1460's to the 1540's, the area now known as San Francisco was home to a small Chōsokabe Japanese trader camp known as Petanaruka (the name likely taken from a preexisting native village), which served as a base for Chōsokabe Japan's whaling and trading routes. The colony was abandoned in the 1540's following attacks by the Absarook and economic decline on the main islands of Japan. The Absarook effectively wiped the Japanese influences clean; this meant that when the Castilians under Don Gaspar de Portolá led a southward expedition in 1721, the depopulated peninsula became a prime spot for a Castilian settlement. At that date, San Francisco was founded, first as a missionary outpost, but it later became an important port due to its tactical location and perfect natural harbor. From its foundation, the port grew into New Castile's/Pacifica's important cultural center, much like Cidade de Anjos did in Portuguese Santa Ana. The city was also the center of modern thinking and liberalism in the colony, as it was the site of an anarchist rebellion in 1790 known as De Moura's Rebellion. When the Fernandista monarchists first revolted in 1846, the city was a strong Republican stronghold, but after the monarchist victory in 1849, the Fernandistas were quick to make the tactical city one of their strongholds. This was a smart decision, as even after the victory over Fernandista Pacifica by the Californian-British-Japanese coalition in 1861, the Crown of Castile was allowed to maintain control over the city proper. At around the same time, the Fernandistas, low on workers, began contracting Chinese laborers via the Japanese to build the Transcontinental Railroad, a project joint-developed by California, the First Peoples Confederation, and the British Empire. In 1883, though, the city was fully ceded to California, and became one of that country's most important cities. Still an important city of California today, it retains many historic buildings, and is a popular tourist destination due to its architecture, surroundings, and mild climate.

    Kentucky

    Louisville - Like many of the cities of the lands originally explored by the Dutch (after the Native Americans, that is), this city has its roots in German-Dutch culture. The city was originally founded as Lodewijkstad, named after its founder, Lodewijk van Bergen, in 1700. After the Dutch defeat in the Vespuccian Revolution, many cities in the nation changed their names from the Dutch to the German versions, so Lodewijkstad became Ludwigstadt sometime in the 1720's or 1730's. During this time, Ludwigstadt became a significant trading center along the Ohio River, and its ports welcomed many laborers from British North America. In 1824, Ludwigstadt was the center of Kentucky's Neo-Platonist rebellion, and even a few years later the lingering Neo-Platonists were a bane for the city. While all of this happened, the city saw an influx of ex-British and Scots-Irish immigration, mostly due to famine and (later) pro-Prydain sentiments in a place that was staunchly pro-monarchy. By the time of the Vespuccian League's fall in 1869, the city was largely English and Irish, though the city's German culture remained as an elite minority. During the rule of the McCoy family in Kentucky (1869-1882), Louisville grew as an industrial center along the Ohio River, competing with British North America's Cincinnati, despite the toil the city took during the Hatfield-McCoy War. This war, however, helped the establishment of factories and housing in the city, which, even under the subsequent French occupation, led to population increase and economic growth. What also happened after this war is, like many other cities that were incorporated into French Louisiana, the city underwent a pro-Francophone name change in an attempt to erase the city's German history. The name was immediately changed from Ludwigstadt to Louisville in 1882.

    New Mexico

    Santa Fe - In the last decade of the 18th century, missionaries from Portuguese Santa Ana trekked inland across the Mojave and Sonora deserts to establish mission outposts in order to introduce Catholicism into the Native American lands. One of these prominent settlements was Santa Fé, a small fortress established on the border of the First Peoples Confederation in 1797. Though Santa Fé remained outside the de facto territory of Portugal (and indeed the de jure territory for most of its history), the Portuguese population thrived there as Santa Fe was a dominant center of trade that linked Portuguese Santa Ana with French Louisiana. When the Mexica settled the region in the 1860's, Santa Fé was easily the largest settlement with an estimated population of 4,500. The Portuguese missionary class maintained power in the city, even as ""pioneers" arrived from the Euro-American states and the historic lands of the Mexica Empire alike. Santa Fé bore the brunt of the Navajo war against the Mexica, and many Portuguese fled to France to escape persecution by the Navajo occupiers. As few returned or remained after the war, a culture of primarily Euro-American origins began to manifest and grow strong. Santa Fe (thereafter without the accent) became New Mexico's capital upon the state's foundation in 1976. Today, the city continues to take pride in its Iberian origin and history.

    Truth or Consequences - Not including earlier settlement by indigenous peoples and empires, the region was first explored by French freebooters and explorers in the late 18th and early 19th centuries. The modern city was originally a passage point known for its mineral spring, and thus when the Mexica Empire began to seek refuge to the north in the 1860's, they encountered a small population of Frenchmen. The Mexica allowed the Frenchmen to remain, and like many cities in the northern frontier of the revitalized Mexica Empire, the ethnic composition was mostly European-descended. Truth or Consequences became the town's name after its foundation (and this is a translation from the Nahautl name). It was invaded during the Navajo Expansion, and was subsequently rebuilt and repopulated by Anglophone immigrants mostly from the Louisianan districts of Missouri and Kentucky (like the rest of the post-Navajo Southwest).

    North Carolina

    Fayetteville - After the 1718 Treaty of Vienna, which brought a conclusion to the Great Northern War and the Vespuccian War of Independence, Baron Albrecht Von Meiss managed to acquire a large portion of Dutch Karolina for the Union of Ten Thousand Mountains. Within this land, at the time known as Neu Schwyz, the small hamlet of jut two homesteads known as Sukidi (founded in 1691) was quickly transformed into the town of Kruisingbeck. During Neu Schwyz' existence as a semi-autonomous joint colonial territory, Kruisingbeck was the third largest city (behind Willemstadt and Neu Bern, respectively), but was always important due to the presence of Fort Brunn, Neu Schwyz' largest military outpost. Kruisingbeck's transition from Neu Schwyz to Noordkarolina was peaceful, and it was easily incorporated into Karolina after the 1856 reforms. After the Hatfield-McCoy War and the following Anglicifation of Carolinhe city's name was changed to "Fayetteville" after Wallace Fayette, an important Anglo-Vespuccian of the late 18th century. Once the British left in 1893, Carolina was left in a mess of increased racial and ethnic tension, and Fayetteville was the site of lynch mobs in 1898 and 1906. Racial violence, economic stagnation, and poor working conditions helped the foundation of the communist regime in 1919, and Fayetteville was always one of the more pro-communist cities. Unlike other major Carolinian cities, Fayetteville did not see name change during the communist rule, and after 1970, the city remained much the same. It still is an important military site, now for the United States.

    Ohio

    Chillicothe - British settlers first named this small outpost as Chillicothe in 1797. It became the capital of the independent Republic of Ohio in 1893 and remained so until the creation of the Great Lakes Peoples Federation in 1932, after which Columbus was made the new capital of the state. It survived the revolution in Ohio as a rather peaceful Ohio city; it is now known affectionately as "Ohio's First Capital" and "Tree City USA".

    Cincinnati - Founded in 1790 by British settlers, its strategic position on the Ohio River made it an appealing industrial center. Starting in the 1830's it was known as Porkopolis, though its steel industry was strong as well. In the next decade, many German immigrants and migrant workers arrived in the city, giving it the nickname "Little Düsseldorf". As the 19th century turned into the 20th century, Cleveland's more modern manufacturing industry caused Cincinnati to lag behind.

    Columbus - Though the British founded this city in 1811, it remained somewhat small until the beginning of the 1900's, when, under the booming Republic of Ohio, it became a rising industrial center. As a center of modernization (and much more in comparison to Cincinnati and Cleveland), it became the capital of the Great Lakes Peoples Federation state of Ohio in 1932. While other Ohioan cities began to show the bruises of deindustrialization, Columbus successfully modernized, and it was for this reason that the city of Columbus remains as Ohio's capital to this day.

    South Carolina

    Hilton Head Island - The area was first mapped by the Dahomean colonizers in the early 1500s, and the island soon became the site of several cotton farms. As these farms grew, so did the population, with the city of Owu being founded in 1554. Owu became a popular vacation and rest site for Dahomey-over-the-Sea's slave-owning elite, both African and European. After Nnamani's rule over Dahomey-over-the-Sea, the city was basically purchased by the cotton tycoon Alexander Hilton in 1818, who named it Hilton Head the following year. Hilton Head, not having strong African influences in architecture (unlike other settlements in the area), became a hub on English culture. Even throughout various wars and the communist takeover, the city remained "Hilton Head Island". In the 1970's, with the fall of communism in Carolina, Hilton Head became an extremely popular tourist destination, and remains so today. The city is also known for its Gullah culture, the result of the emancipation of the slaves in 1859.

    Myrtle Beach - Though Dahomey was the first nation to explore the region in the very early 1500's, the Dutch were the first to establish permanent settlements, with small outposts being founded by 1600. One of these outposts was known as Mirtlestrand, founded in 1618, and was prominent for several reasons. For one, its population consisted of a high amount of Catholic Swiss and Franconian Germans, who would eventually settle farther north in coming decades. In addition, it was home to a large Catholic mission and a significant Italian population, being the only major port in pre-Vespuccia like that. As Mirtlestrand was an important Catholic city and had little ties with the Dutch, it was easily taken by the Pope after the Great Northern War as per the 1718 Treaty of Vienna. Lido Mirto (the Italian name for the Dutch port) and its surrounding areas became a Papal outpost, remaining a possession of the Vatican until 1833, when the now-powerful Vespuccian League appropriated the Church lands with little opposition. Under de jure Vespuccian rule, Lido Mirto (to become Myrtle Beach in 1847), like many other cities of Karolina, saw a gradual Anglification that was virtually complete by 1883. The Baptist and Anglophone Myrtle Beach would become a major resort town by 2013.

    Port Royal - Before the Age of Colonization, the land was inhabited by both Siouan and Muskogean peoples. On August 11th, 1492, a Dahomean exploration vessel, led by Semeo Dofo, made a landing in a secluded estuary in what is now South Carolina. Seeing the land as perfect for settlement, Dofo initiated colonization by the Republic of Dahomey, resulting in the creation of the city of Welcome Port and the colony of Dahomey-over-the-Sea (both retroactive English renderings of Fon names) soon thereafter. From its inception until the late 1700's, Welcome Port was the hub of the slave trade, with most of America's African-descended slaves having passed through the city at least for a portion of their journey across the Atlantic. Welcome Port was known for its rich African culture and powerful African elite, many being owners of African and even Irish servants. However, starting with the tenure of John S. Nnamani as colonial governer of Dahomey-over-the-Sea, Welcome Port's African culture gradually yielded to a European/Creole one. In the next century, Dahomey-over-the-Sea's assets were pretty much in the hands of the German, Dutch, and English aristocrats of Vespuccia. In 1856, the Vespuccian government dissolved Dahomey-over-the-Sea, and slavery was abolished soon afterward, resulting in the dissipation of the local African aristocracy's authority. When the Vespuccian League dissolved in 1869, Welcome Port became an administrative center for the Hatfleid family, with them emulating Virginia's English culture on the area. During the Hatfield-McCoy War, Welcome Port was sieged by Anglo-French forces. The war catalyzed the change of Welcome Port. After the war, in accordance with English city renaming, the city of Welcome Port became Port Royal in 1883. Becoming a minor city, Port Royal's name was changed once again, this time to Holmes City, under the communist Carolina government in the year 1924. The remaining African structures which didn't survive Nnamani's Europeanization, the dissolution of Dahomey-over-the-Sea, or the Hatfield McCoy War (a very small number indeed) were demolished during the communist era, with the proletariat seeing them as symbols of Dahomey's mercantilist and pro-slavery policies. Carolina abandoned communism and joined the United States in 1971, and the city's name was changed back to Port Royal. Nowadays it is a rather small city in South Carolina, shadowed by Chaleston, Myrtle Beach, and Hilton Head Island.
     
    Last edited: Sep 18, 2016