Crusader Kings II - Paradox Entertainement (02/12)

Discussion in 'Alternate History Books and Media' started by Tellus, Nov 17, 2011.

  1. Tyler96 Well-Known Member

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    Adelaide, South Australia
    She was only mostly dead.

    CK2: Incest Zombie Clone Babies (Still a Better DLC Than Sunset Invasion).
     
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  2. LSCatilina Feudal Leftist Extraordinaire

    Joined:
    Dec 5, 2008
    Location:
    Albi, Patria Linguae Occitanae
    I decided to run a game from 771 onwards as the last of Eudon's successors. In CKII, they're strangely considered as descendents from Loup, who even more strangely isn't considered as a duke. Still, I began as Hunald of Aquitaine, which (strangely seems to be too old to be the son of Waifre, probably confusing with his grand-father)

    Hunald (II), duke of Aquitaine (768-774)
    As in CKII timeline, Hunald doesn't seems to have revolted, he remains one of the several Loupings in charge of the South-Western Aquitaine, arguably the more powerful of these. He had only one direct descendent, his grand-son Loup. Charles quickly disappeared, leaving Carloman as sole king of the regnum Francorum
    His reign is fairly uneventful, except for a nobiliar revolt from which he managed to get victorious, mostly thanks toa general revolt against Carloman which crushed revoltees armies. It allowed Hunald to recover his grand-father holdings in Bordeaux.

    Loup (II) "the Just", prince of Aquitaine (774-819)
    At first, his reign looked particularily bad : he was considered as lazy and dull, without much redeeming qualities, while Carloman increased his power and conquered Saxony.
    In fact, his decision to ally with Saxon revoltees looked like one of the worst ideas he could pull off. But Carloman's reign was shaky enough (general revolts, and unceasing creations of titles) that as Franks get chased out of Saxony, Loup managed to recreate an independent Principalty of Aquitaine as a result, without any real Frankish interventions.
    Carloman's successors were unable to preserve the unity of the regnum, and some nobiliar families as Robertians even managed to take the royal title in Austrasia and Bavaria.

    His principalty is mostly stuck to the Atlantic shore, and 2/3 of Aquitaine is still under Frankish control, but Loup outgrew his reputation and became a fairly competent ruler who turned back to the traditional alliance with Lombards in order to prevent any tentative of Frankish reconquest : but these are more preoccupied at this point by Viking raids (that did plagued Aquitaine as well). On several matters, the inner policy of Loup II is similar to Hunald II's : curbing down the power of local potentes and building a network of alliance with Neustrian and Aquitain families in the regnum Francorum (mostly Anjou and Gascony)

    By the time of his death, he was the most powerful prince in western Gaul, regularily fending off Norse raids and managing to maintain the principalty in order without revolts in decades.
    It allowed him, shorty before he died of cancer, to repel Arabo-Berbers (which went trough their own succession crisis, as Umayyads were dethroned) out of Navarra, freeing up the western passes, as a prologue to the Aquitain expeditions in Spain that marked the Xth century, and beggining the Asturian/Aquitain alliance.

    Loup (III), prince of Aquitaine (819-827)

    Looking like an embettered version of his father at the same age, he still had a pretty much uneventful reign, norse raids going trough a pause, until he decided to claim kingship on Aquitaine from the child-king Adelin. After having made alliance with the Carolingian kingdom of Burgundy (whom he was issued from his mother) and waited long enough to appease some nobiliar concerns, he raised a large ost and advanced in Gascony, hoping his cousins would support his claim, and that the wars in Lemosin and the wars against Moors the kingdom was would be at his advantage for a quick war.
    Which didn't happened : the war for Aquitaine was long and costly, and eventually led to his death as he fell on the field at the Battle of Ausc.

    Loup IV, prince of Aquitaine (827-829)
    Loup I, king of Aquitaine (829-831)

    Loup III's son, also named Loup, had to fend off the Gascon counter-attack that advanced as far as Loire, but eventually crushed with Burgundian support, gascon armies at Engoleime in late 827.
    From this point, the conquest of Gascony became easier as Gascons and to battle against Aquitains and Moors, eventually giving up the kingship to Loup in 829, after 3 years of conflict that norse used to raid the aquitain coast and hinterland without much opposition.

    While Loup was victorious and acknowledged as king in all western Aquitaine (Tolsan, Berry and Auvergne remaining divided between Neustrians, Austrasians and Burgundians), effectively reconstituting the principalty of his first namesake, he had to face a strong nobiliar opposition fueled both by the cost of the war and the bitterness of his new vassals, critically after the warring king helped Asturias recovering some lands in Cantabrias.
    The conflict broke down in early 830, but thanks to Asturian and Burgundian support, hinting at an over-reliance of foreign support, Loup I got the better of it : continuing his father policy of strengthening the Louping holdings in the Garonne basin (mostly at the price of giving up on Loire), he chased of felon lords of the region, while giving the duchy of Poitou to the Abbonids.

    This harsh policy and fear of new conflicts probably led to his assassination in 831

    Eudes, count of Saintonge (827-831)
    Eudes I, king of Aquitaine (831-...)

    Eudes succeeded his brother in an uneasy situation : the Louping revival was well established, critically before the succession crisis among Franks and Arabo-Berbers which prevented the appearance of a strong rival at the kingdom's border. But the Burgundian alliance, based on matrimonial ties, was put in a hold.
    In order to give nobles something to feed on, the regent Uc of Peitavès launched an expedition against the divided pyrenean emirs. By 833, most of Middle Ebre basin was on Aquitain hands.
     
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  3. Planet of Hats Pontificating 24/7

    Joined:
    May 10, 2016
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    Outlands of Toronto
    In general, CK2 from the Charlemagne start seems to just make up a lot of fine details about many of the nobles of Francia.
     
  4. Sevarics Just Another Gay Guy

    Joined:
    Feb 9, 2011
    Could always start as the Angelos dynasty in 1066 and try to make them be the saviors of Byzantium
     
  5. Shiva Dreaming... always dreaming...

    Joined:
    Aug 21, 2014
    Location:
    A comfy couch
    I'm doing that with the Doukas, I know it's a bit lazy but I just wanted an easy game this time around. Currently it's the 13th century and Empress Xene 'the Hammer' of the Roman Empire has recently fought off invading Aztec invaders (because I forgot to turn off Sunset Invasion) and is having a torrid affair with the Ecumenical Patriarch of the Orthodox Church and thinking about invading one of the myriad of mini-states that emerged from the wreckage of the Seljuks Empire breaking apart in the face of the 'Rebirth of Rome', the Mongol Invasions, several failed Jihads against Rome (allowing several smaller states to invade them and take land), and several failed invasions of India.
     
  6. Sevarics Just Another Gay Guy

    Joined:
    Feb 9, 2011
    I started in 1066 as Manuel Angelos and managed to use claims to give him the Theme of Samos. Meanwhile, Emperor Constantine X passed away and his son Michael VII Doukas inherited. A faction installed his sister Anna Doukas who was married to an Armenian. Cue Years of unending civil war between Empress Anna and ex-emperor Michael as both fought for the throne. I decided to help Isaac Komnenos claim the though and executed Anna and castrated her male spawn while executing her daughter, thus ending their claims. Meanwhile Manuel Angelos had to chase after Michael and capture him to end that war....

    And then a new civil war starts as 1/3 of the country wants to make Isaac's sister, Theodora Komnena, Empress. Her husband? Manuel.

    Manuel decided to just sit back this war and see what happens.
     
  7. The Tai-Pan Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jun 10, 2015
    Looking to play the first game in a long time. Suggestions?
     
  8. LSCatilina Feudal Leftist Extraordinaire

    Joined:
    Dec 5, 2008
    Location:
    Albi, Patria Linguae Occitanae
    Latin Empire in 1204 is always a good challenge. If you survive the first decades, you'd find some opportunities ahead.

    If you prefer an easier outremer game, the early Kingdom of Jerusalem is interesting while still challenging.

    Last but not least, if you had the raja DLC, try out Indias : it's both familiar and exotic.
     
  9. The Tai-Pan Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jun 10, 2015
    I have not played any games in India. Suggestions for families, places of interest?
     
  10. Lukeanus Emperor of Greater Canada

    Joined:
    Oct 5, 2012
    Location:
    The Greater Canadian Empire
    The Saama dynasty is an interesting game, they exist from the earliest start and control two counties at the mouth of the Indus. The Saama are rajput hindus and their overlord is usually a sindhi muslim.
     
  11. LSCatilina Feudal Leftist Extraordinaire

    Joined:
    Dec 5, 2008
    Location:
    Albi, Patria Linguae Occitanae
    Depending if you want to witness first-hand the arrival of Turks in Middle-East or if you want a but of time to prepare...

    Kamarupa seems to be a popular place to begin in 769, fairly isolated from most of the Central Asian action and sitting on the end of Silk Road for what matter the game map. If you manage to fend off Pala, that is.
    For a less challenging departure in India, Pala dynasty may be advisable.

    If you want to go with a big player right from the start, Rashtrakuta dynasty is the way to go.

    For a more classical beggining, in 1066, Chola dynasty (even if you can't play as thallassocratic they did IOTL with the current mechanics) is enjoyable

    If you just want to taste a bit with beggining in 1337, Vijayanagara Empire may be interesting.

    I didn't played all of these, tough, only Rashtrakuta, so I may have missed a lot of possibilities.

    May I suggest reading bits A History of Ancient and Early Medieval India: From the Stone Age to the 12th Century? It would help you relate a bit with Indian history the same way you may more easily with European, and then double the enjoyment.
     
  12. Sevarics Just Another Gay Guy

    Joined:
    Feb 9, 2011
    As the civil war raged on... Manuel caught smallpox and was cured of it... only to be caught cheating playing chess with death...

    He was survived by four underage sons.
     
  13. Yorel Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    May 27, 2010
    It's not just with Francia. One of the reasons the crew of the HIP mod doesn't do a 769 start date is because Paradox apparently had to resort to fill a few holes with semi-legendary if not legendary figures in parts of the map. There are also a few questionable choices that were made: I've seen a lot of debate on the historicity of Zunism for example.

    To be fair though, the available documentation on the VIIIth century is pretty scarce in some places. And even in parts of the world where we have a lot of documentation, there are still a few things we aren't sure about and that are more theories than sure things.
     
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  14. Shiva Dreaming... always dreaming...

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    Aug 21, 2014
    Location:
    A comfy couch
    I wish they had split the difference with Zunism a bit, maybe make a branch of Hinduism, or a heresy that you could shift out of (if desired).
     
  15. Karolus Rex Writer/History fanatic/Dark Lord of the Sith

    Joined:
    May 26, 2015
    Location:
    Portugal
    I'm trying this right now. First attempt wasn't very successful given that the guy got incapable and died without heirs...or family...
     
  16. Karolus Rex Writer/History fanatic/Dark Lord of the Sith

    Joined:
    May 26, 2015
    Location:
    Portugal
    So small update on my Angelos games. Killed the Count of Chios and Lykia to gain the two counties and the the Doux Konstantinos "The Careless" died and his bastard son, legitimized bastard inherited the Thema while underage. 10 years after gaining power, so the new Doux Basileios was 26, he lead a revolt to achieve elective succession and then I managed to gain Rhodes from the Emperor. Murdered the main heir, challenged the Emperor for a duel, killed him, and now I'm Emperor in 1132.

    EDIT: My reign lasted 6 years... 6 years 2 dead Emperors and now I'm back to be Doux of Samos and I managed to gain the Duchy of Rascia for me and the Duchy of Anatolia to the brother of my current character. Oh and I managed to keep Constantinople.
     
    Last edited: Jan 9, 2017
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  17. Guildencrantz Chairman of the Scioto Valley STATEPLAN Committee

    So I started an After the End game over Christmas as By Laurier, king of Ontario. I was doing really well, getting of of the de jure kingdom under the crown, wrangling with the vassals (you start with a one county duchy as your demesne. Yikes) and handing off the kingdom to my son, who inherited his mother's claim on Hudsonia. A literal child was ruling from Albany and they went through a pretty brutal civil war that killed off a lot of the royal levy, so I hired some mercs and pressed my claim on Hudsonia. It took forever and my threat went through the roof (it was years before I could even sneeze at anyone). When it went down enough, I saw the Americanist scum we're at my borders, so I holy warred for Eastern PA. Then my council changed the title granting law and I didn't notice.

    My king died mid war, so it finished with his son. Since it was a holy war, I was over the demesne limit by like 20, so I started giving out titles.
    I forgot about my council and because I handed out so many titles, I have the tyrant modifier and my council is going to be pissed at me for thirty fucking years.

    I'm starting a new game now
     
  18. Sevarics Just Another Gay Guy

    Joined:
    Feb 9, 2011
    My current character's mother was installed to throne as Empress Theodora II Komnena. I made her celibate so she wouldn't remarry and pop out babies in the purple... unfortunately my current underage character has crappy stats... but his brothers are pretty good
     
  19. LSCatilina Feudal Leftist Extraordinaire

    Joined:
    Dec 5, 2008
    Location:
    Albi, Patria Linguae Occitanae
    Re-writing and continuing this.

    I began a game, playing the Dukes of Aquitaine. Luponids formally were dukes of all Aquitaine, ruling over it as an independent principalty, before the Arabo-Berber raids of the VIIIth and the reconquest by Peppinids made them significantly reduced and under Frankish alliegance.
    My primary goal is to get back all of Aquitaine that acknowledged Eudon's authority, and then to claim the imperium against Franks or Lombards.

    Hunald II, duke of Aquitaine (768-774)
    As in CKII timeline, he doesn't seems to have revolted, he remains one of the several Luponids in the regions with County of Gascony and the County of Foìs, arguably the more powerful of these.

    He had only one direct descendent, his grand-son Loup. Charles quickly disappeared, leaving Carloman as sole king of the regnum Francorum
    His reign is fairly uneventful, except for a nobiliar revolt from which he managed to get victorious, mostly thanks toa general revolt against Carloman which crushed revoltees armies. It allowed Hunald to recover his grand-father holdings in Bordeaux.

    Loup II 'the Just', prince of Aquitaine (774-819)
    At first, his reign promised to be bad : he was considered as lazy and dull, without much redeeming qualities, while Carloman increased his power and conquered Saxony.
    In fact, his decision to ally with Saxon revoltees looked like one of the worst ideas he could pull off.

    But Carloman's reign was shaky enough (general revolts, and endlessly creations of titles) that as Franks get chased out of Saxony, Loup managed to recreate an independent Principalty of Aquitaine as a result, without any real Frankish interventions against him.
    Carloman's successors were unable to preserve the unity of the regnum, and some nobiliar families as Robertians even managed to take the royal title in Austrasia and Bavaria, allowing Aquitaine to enjoy a relatively long period of peace, safe for regular Norse raids.

    His principalty is mostly stuck to the Atlantic shore, and 2/3 of Aquitaine is still under Frankish control, but Loup outgrew his reputation and became a fairly competent ruler who turned back to the traditional alliance with Lombards in order to prevent any tentative of Frankish reconquest : but these are more preoccupied at this point by Viking raids (that did plagued Aquitaine as well). On several matters, the inner policy of Loup II is similar to Hunald II's : curbing down the power of local potentes and building a network of alliance with Neustrian and Aquitain families in the regnum Francorum (mostly Anjou and Gascony)

    By the time of his death, he was the most powerful prince in western Gaul, regularily raids and managing to maintain the principalty in order without revolts in decades.
    It allowed him, shorty before he died of cancer, to repel Arabo-Berbers (which went trough their own succession crisis, as Umayyads were dethroned) out of Navarra, freeing up the western passes, as a prologue to the Aquitain expeditions in Spain that marked the Xth century, and beggining the Asturian/Aquitain alliance.

    [​IMG]
    Aquitaine at the death of Loup II​

    Loup III, prince of Aquitaine (819-827)

    Loup, king of Aquitaine (826-827)
    An embettered version of his father at the same age, hebeneficied from a fairly peaceful principalty from his father , with even norse raids going trough a pause. The desintegration of the regnum Francorum allowed him to reclaim the claim kingship on Aquitaine from the child-king Adelin.
    After having made alliance with the Carolingian kingdom of Burgundy (whom he was issued from his mother) and waited long enough to appease some nobiliar concerns, he raised a large ost and advanced in Gascony, hoping his cousins would support his claim, and that the wars in Lemosin and the wars against Moors the kingdom was would be at his advantage for a quick war.
    Which didn't happened : the war for Aquitaine was long and costly, and eventually led to his death as he fell on the field at the Battle of Ausc.

    Loup IV, prince of Aquitaine (827-829) Loup I, king of Aquitaine (829-831)

    Loup III's son, also named Loup, had to fend off the Gascon counter-attack that advanced as far as Loire, but eventually crushed with Burgundian support, gascon armies at Engoleime in late 827.
    From this point, the conquest of Gascony became easier as Gascons and to battle against Aquitains and Moors, eventually giving up the kingship to Loup in 829, after 3 years of conflict that norse used to raid the aquitain coast and hinterland without much opposition.

    While Loup was victorious and acknowledged as king in all western Aquitaine (Tolsan, Berry and Auvergne remaining divided between Neustrians, Austrasians and Burgundians), effectively reconstituting the principalty of his first namesake, he had to face a strong nobiliar opposition fueled both by the cost of the war and the bitterness of his new vassals, critically after the warring king helped Asturias recovering some lands in Cantabrias.
    The conflict broke down in early 830, but thanks to Asturian and Burgundian support, hinting at an over-reliance of foreign support, Loup I got the better of it : continuing his father policy of strengthening the Louping holdings in the Garonne basin (mostly at the price of giving up on Loire), he chased of felon lords of the region, while giving the duchy of Poitou to the Abbonids.

    This harsh policy and fear of new conflicts probably led to his assassination in 831

    [​IMG]
    Aquitaine at the death of Loup IV

    Eudon, count of Saintonge (827-831)
    Eudon II 'the Bold', king of Aquitaine (831-861)

    Eudon succeeded his brother in an uneasy situation : the Luponid revival was well established, critically before the succession crisis among Franks and Arabo-Berbers which prevented the appearance of a strong rival at the kingdom's border. But the Burgundian alliance, based on matrimonial ties, was put in a hold.
    In order to give nobles something to feed on, the regent Uc of Peitau launched an expedition against the divided pyrenean emirs. By 833, most of Middle Ebre basin was on Aquitain hands.

    Nevertheless, the nobiliar unrest became an almost permanent feature of Eudon's reign. But the first blow for Aquitain's success was the sudden shift of alliances, and the Asturian attack in Pyrenees, in order to claim back the County of Pampalona. As the control over western Pyrenean passes was strategically decisive, Uc of Peitau gathered a large army for what was a mostly localized conflict in Pamaplonès and Viscay, but while the conflict ended with an Aquitain victory, it weakened the military resources of the kingdom, increasingly lead to a nobiliar distrust and at the cost of the Asturian alliance : when the Luponid county of Pampalona eventually inherited the Duchy of Anjou making the region entering Frankish orbit, it let the impression of a great waste.

    The next important threat came from Carloman II, which gathered anew the various frankish kingdoms at the exception of Robertian Austrasia. As soon as Eudon personally ruled over an Aquitaine who just fought against Asturias, the Carolingian king claimed back the kingship of Aquitaine. Giving the weakened leverage Luponids had on the potentes of the kingdom, defeat would have meant loosing not only the kingship but as well suzerainty over Peitau, Gascony and Lemosin.
    But in face of the formidable army gathered by Carloman, Eudon had no choice but to resort to enrolling Norse raiding bands at his service to complete forces that just went out of a conflict. The war was particularily costly for both men and treasury, and Eudon's efforts (as well than a revolt of Burgundian nobles) barely managed to owe Aquitaine a white peace.

    The Carolingian threat looming over Aquitaine provoked a radical change of Luponid's policies : as the nobles began to ask for the payments of the efforts, threatening to revolt if their requests weren't met, Eudon had little choice than to step down and allow a greater participation of potentes on his rule.
    The loss of Pamaplonès meant that the lands gained in Sargossan were effectively cut from Aquitaine, opening the region to Arabo-Berber raids and campaigns. Guilhèm Talhafer was made marchio of Sargossan in order to unify the region as a defense against Andalusian tentatives.

    In the 840's, viking raids became to be more worrying in size and occurence, in the same time that Norse kingdoms get established, with centers in Noregr and Sviþjod, but regularily fought against themselves or inner revolts. It lead to a certain decline in prosperity of the Atlantic shores, Tolsan and Cadurcin harboring more palatial residence from this point onward.

    Meanwhile, the necessity to obtain more ressources against a new Frankish campaign led Eudon to focuses his efforts against Gothia, held at this point by Austrasians. No less than 4 campaigns were necessary to recover the Tolsan, effectively closing up Garona basin. The effort was too important for what nobles could be mattered tough, and a conspiration to replace Eudon with his uncle Vincent unfoiled : even if defeated, it pointed how much Luponid rule over their potentes and vassals was weakened.

    As Eudon prepared a new campaign against Austrasian Gothia, in order to free passage to eastern Pyrenean passes, he was brutally murdered in 852 : the succession of royal murders, which was eventually dubbed "phonocracy" let his minor son Loup II in charge.

    In spite of a troubled reign, Eudon II is sometimes credited with being the first real king of Aquitaine, having given much of the early institution of the realm as well definying the traditional Aquitain "mediterranean tropism".

    [​IMG]
    Kingfom of Aquitaine at Eudon II's death.
    Loup, king of Aquitaine (861)
    The child-king didn't outlived his father by long, being murdered himself mere months after : he's generally not numbered as king.
    The only wortwhile fact of his reign was the beggining growing independence of Abbonids in Peitau, as Abbon II was ousted out of the regency.

    Adalgis I 'the Just', king of Aquitaine (861-915)
    Adalgis I, king of Mercia (907-912) - Adalgis I, king of England (912-915)

    The first part of his rule was merely troubled by the refusal of the Duchess of Gascony to acknowledge Adalgis' authority, which was swiftly dealt with. More worrying was the propency of potentes to advance their own interests : Hugonids inherited the duchy of Peitau as well the counties held by Adalgis great-uncles descendents and warring against the Countess of Lemosin to take on the northern part of the county, while Talhafers fought against their own vassals, monopolizing the whole of the march safe Jaca.

    The regent seems to have been fairly content with preserving Adalgis' holdings without so much as continuing Eudon II's policies except by a short and unsuccessful war against rebel Arab lords on the lower Ebre valley.
    Adalgis took power in a relatively stagnant Aquitaine, mostly safe from Frankish interventions thanks to a particularily chaotic situation in Frankish Germany, which allowed him to campaign regularily against Austrasian holdings in Gothia.

    Eventually, the conflict between Austrasia and Aquitaine became the major conflict in the late IXth and early Xth century, being a succession of wars and treves between the late 870's and the early 910's sometimes nicknamed the Southern War of Forty Years, atlough the War of Succession of Mercia tends to be taken apart as it involes conflict against local foes.

    As forces of both kingdoms managed to gather a relatively unified army, the campaigns in Lower Gothia, originally targeted to the remnants of Sayyrid emirate, as they were chased off by the powerful Ure Emirs of Africa, eventually led to a conflict between Austrasia and Gothia in the region, both kingdom having resorted to same plans of conquest. After that Adalgis took most of Lower Gothia up to Barcelona, following his father's foothsteps, he had to fight yet 10 years to conquers the rest of it.

    The long, if relatively not that tense, conflict against Austria led to a new array of request from nobility, which refused to send too much of their own armies and themselves on continuous wars, which forced Luponids to resort even more to mercenaryship.
    This much became obvious with the War of Succession of Mercia : as the Austrasian kings (whom real favoured an anti-dynastic kingship, as none of ruling dynasties managed to hold the throne more than two generations) became overlords in Mercia and parts of Deire, it was feared they would become too powerful to be effectivelly bullied out of Aquitaine.
    As Adalgis pretexted his superior rights from his mother, he had to use, for he lacked support in England, resort massively to Gascons and Lombards mercenaries in what was fortunately a short war, while most of the realms' troops were busy repealling Austrasians in Tolsan and Lemosin.

    The coronation of Adalgis as king of Mercia, opened a excentric part of Aquitain history where the focus was less put into expanding or strengthening holdings in Gaul or Spain : while he reinforced the Lombard alliance thanks to a proactive matrimonial diplomacy and send his son Loup participating to the campaigns against Ure in Africa, Adalgis eventually passed more time in England reorganizing the local institutions, as well as chasing Norses out of Essex in 909. Eventually, he fought victoriously against the heretics of Kent, claiming the Bretwalda over all the south of the Island (as Picts conquered everything up to Umber in the last decades), formally being known as Rex Anglorum.

    Possibly related, the increasingly threatening and devastating (especially in Peitau) Norse raids in western Aquitaine tended to disappear for a while, the whole of Garona basin experiencing a new prosperity after decades of damages due to raids and epidemics.

    While some says he planned to force the King of East-Anglia into obedience, circumstances forced him to return in Aquitaine, as the Ure emirs launched a reconquest of lost territories in Spain and Africa after having crushed their rivals. Ure invasion, backed with all the strength of Islamic West, was repealled at a great cost after 3 years of conflict, in spite of support provided by French and Lombards expeditions, themselves being pressured in Africa.

    This new threat, and the risk of overextending his demesne, may have led Adalgis to give the throne of England to his son Eudon in 915, briefly before dying, poisoned.
    The great legacy of Adalgis is less about Aquitain territorial expension, altough it did continued the policies of Eudon II, than having created a whole diplomatic and familial network in Europe whom Luponids could benefit.

    [​IMG]
    Aquitaine and Luponid holgings at the beggining of Loup III's reign
    (after he inherited the Duchy of Upper Gothia after his young brother murder)​

    Loup III, king of Aquitaine (915-...)
     
    Last edited: Jan 10, 2017
  20. impulsive New Member

    Joined:
    Nov 25, 2016
    Been playing the newest expansion so far with the CK2 plus mod. I like HIP but for some reason i get the most entertaining stuff happen to me in plus. I also like how they handle the earlier start dates with a united christianity before the schism and the Carolingian empire as an actual united empire, since it forces alot of the wars and strife that ironically didn't really happen back in the day when they were separate realms.

    I've been playing as the Count of Anjou although i've worked my way up to become Duke of Anjou, actually duke of several titles and holdings now and I even own Paris as my capital but I am not king.

    The most enteratining thing I noticed was the East Francia King Karl who came to be known as the Fat who was an insane cannibal that lingered on for years. He put down revolt after revolt, typically eating his enemies before finally dying of food poisoning funnily enough.
     
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