Alternate Aircraft--Doolittle Raid

Discussion in 'Alternate History Discussion: After 1900' started by ChuckAnderson, May 16, 2011.

  1. ChuckAnderson Member

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    Hi Everyone!

    Before the North American B-25 Mitchell was finally chosen as the aircraft type used in Jimmy Doolittle's bombing mission over Japan, other aircraft types were also being considered.

    One of them is the Fairey Hendon (modified from the original for the mission), a British bomber design.

    The profile shows the Fairey Hendon in the same colours and markings as those actually used on the B-25's that actually took part in the mission.


    Chuck

    Fairey Hendon (Doolittle Raid).JPG
     
  2. Torqumada Breast Man and urban legend

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    Half the speed, 25% of the bomb load, 4,000 less feet for service ceiling, 8 feet longer with 40 more feet wingspan for 10 more miles of range? Why would they consider it?

    Torqumada
     
  3. Matt Wiser Well-Known Member

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    Only four aircraft were really in the running for the raid: the B-18 Bolo, the B-23 Dragon, the B-26 Marauder, and the B-25. Only the Mitchell met the range requirement, and more importantly, the wingspan requirement for flying off a carrier.
     
  4. Just Leo Curmudgeon with a heart of gold

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    I think you're using JPEG for your art. The color definition degrades badly. Try PNG or one of the IFF's.

    The Mitchell was powered by R-2600 Wrights. The aborted B-28 used P&W R-2800's to achieve much higher performance, with turbocharging. Combine the two and add folding wings for the PB2J ship-board bomber, presaging the Savage, A3D, and Vigilante.

    PB2Jnosessmall.png
     
  5. Derek Jackson Member

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    Were Mosquitos avaiable then and would Britain have offered them?>
     
  6. Just Leo Curmudgeon with a heart of gold

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    They were just entering service as a new type. Had they been available earlier in quantity, they would still not have been considered an American response to Japanese aggression for propaganda and morale purposes.
     
  7. phx1138 Bocagiste troll

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    If you're going to go that far, why not make them R4360s?:eek::p
     
  8. Just Leo Curmudgeon with a heart of gold

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    Because the R-2800's were used in the XB-28, were available and reliable, and proved the performance specification. The R 4360 did not, and could not.
     
  9. Derek Jackson Member

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    If Mosquitos were available and used by US forces of course they would have had US markings
     
  10. Dathi THorfinnsson Da├░i ├×orfinnsson

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    Id hate to put aplywood plane on the deck of an aircraft carrier exposed to nort pacific weather....
     
  11. KyleB Fighter of the Nightman

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    What about the Vickers Wellington? The Mk IC had a range of 2,550 miles; would that be enough?
     
  12. Matt Wiser Well-Known Member

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    Too big for the carrier deck: the B-25s barely made it as it was. When there were takeoff tests from Hornet off of Norfolk, VA, one of the pilots almost hit the carrier's island on launch. That explains the guide lines painted on the carrier deck that you see in film footage of the B-25s on the deck of Hornet. Only four aircraft, again, were considered: the B-18 (lack of range and payload), B-23 Dragon (range, but lack of decent bombload), B-25 (range, payload, and size requirements all met), and B-26 (too big to fit on carrier).